Results for: How to fall asleep fast

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It’s enough to take a breath. Take a deep breath of air through your nose. As deep as possible, and when you feel that you can’t inhale anymore, try to top it off with another …

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Whether your mind keeps wandering or you’re guilty of indulging in caffeine too close to bedtime, figuring out how to fall asleep fast when you’re full of energy can seem near impossible. …

How to Fall Asleep Fast - The Sleep Doctor

17-05-2022 · Breathe out through your mouth, saying “Whoosh.”. With your mouth closed, breathe in through your nose as you mentally count to four. Hold your breath while mentally counting to seven. …

17-05-2022

Your body needs regular, restful sleep to stay healthy and function properly. Sleep plays an important role in a range of mental and physical processes, from repairing cells and regulating hormones to the formation of memories. Without sleep, it is harder for the body to fight infections and recover from illnesses.

Despite the importance of sleep, there are a number of reasons why people find themselves struggling to fall asleep. Sometimes, these reasons are minor, such as consuming caffeine too close to bedtime or trying to sleep in a noisy environment. However, in some cases, trouble sleeping is a sign of a more serious issue like depression or a sleep disorder.

Learning methods for falling asleep quickly may alleviate the stress of tossing and turning and help you get better, longer sleep. We look at how to fall asleep fast, what to do if you can’t sleep, and how activities like meditation before bed can help you get better rest.

Lower the Thermostat

Research suggests that room temperature can have an impact on sleep. Body temperatures drop when people fall asleep, and in order to balance this reduction in temperature, most people use bedding to create a warm “microclimate” around their body. A cooler room temperature can encourage a sleeper to curl up under a blanket, which warms the skin and accelerates the process of falling asleep.

If you are having trouble falling asleep, try setting your thermostat between 65 and 68 degrees Fahrenheit. If you do not have air conditioning, consider reducing the temperature in the bedroom by opening doors and windows to promote air flow, using a fan, or covering windows with dark curtains.

Take a Warm Shower or Bath

Bathing in hot or warm water may also help people fall asleep faster. A hot bath can trigger changes in a person’s body temperature that promote relaxation and sleepiness. Several studies have shown that those who take a warm bath or shower within two hours of bedtime report better overall sleep quality. Even spending just 10 minutes in a warm bath can help people fall asleep faster and spend less time in bed awake.

Exercise Earlier in the Day

Regular physical activity is associated with better sleep and may even help to prevent insomnia. Although researchers are not entirely sure why exercise promotes better sleep, some suggest that people who struggle to fall asleep may have problems lowering their core temperature at night. Working out may help regulate the body’s temperature.

However, exercising too soon before bedtime may keep some people awake at night. If you regularly struggle to fall or stay asleep, avoid working out less than two to three hours before you go to bed, especially in a brightly lit gym. Bright lights and vigorous exercise before bed may disrupt some individuals’ sleep cycles and prevent the body from releasing hormones required for sleep.

What Type of Exercise Is Best for Sleep?

All types of exercise have the potential to improve sleep, even a daily 10-minute walk. Certain exercises may be especially helpful to people who have a hard time getting a good night’s sleep.

  • Cardio and aerobic exercises: Exercises that increase the activity of the heart and lungs can reduce the symptoms of depression and obstructive sleep apnea, improving overall sleep quality.
  • Strength training: Resistance exercise and strength training may also relieve symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea and lead to better sleep when practiced consistently.
  • High-intensity workouts: Regular high-intensity interval training may reduce the symptoms of depression and help people fall asleep faster.
  • Yoga: Practicing yoga and stretching before bed may help some fall asleep faster, as well as lead to an improved mood and overall well-being.

Practice Meditation

Meditation techniques focus the attention and help people have calm reactions to stressful thoughts and situations. Although there are many different types of meditation, most involve focusing, breathing steadily, and maintaining a particular posture in a quiet space. Studies show that certain practices, including mindfulness meditation, may promote better sleep.

Before you begin meditating, choose a quiet place without distractions where you will not be interrupted. Breathe slowly as you focus your attention on a word, object, or phrase of your choice, allowing thoughts to pass through your mind without losing your focus.

For other ideas and techniques, it may be helpful to contact in-person or online organizations that support meditation practices.

4-7-8 Method

Dr. Andrew Weil popularized the 4-7-8 method, a type of meditation meant to help people relax. Dr. Weil claims that this meditation acts as a natural tranquilizer that grows more effective the more you practice it.

The 4-7-8 method includes the following steps:

  1. Sit up straight with the end of your tongue behind your top front teeth throughout the exercise.
  2. Breathe out through your mouth, saying “Whoosh.”
  3. With your mouth closed, breathe in through your nose as you mentally count to four.
  4. Hold your breath while mentally counting to seven.
  5. Breathe out through your mouth and say “Whoosh” as you mentally count to eight.
  6. Breathe in and repeat the steps above three times.

Dr. Weil suggests performing the 4-7-8 method at least twice a day, although he cautions people to avoid doing more than four repeated breaths per session in their first month of practicing the meditation.

Avoid Electronics Before Bed

While it may be tempting to turn on the TV or check your phone when you are tossing and turning, electronics might make it harder to fall asleep. Electronic devices such as TVs, smartphones, laptops, and tablets are not only distracting, they also emit blue light, which can negatively affect the sleep cycle. Being exposed to bright light or blue light within two hours of bedtime causes people to stay alert longer and feel sleepy later.

Fortunately, there are some measures you can take to use electronics in the evening without interfering with your sleep cycle. Special blue-blocking glasses may help people fall asleep faster, even if they are exposed to blue light before bed. In addition, some devices now come with blue light filters that automatically turn on at a certain time of day.

Keep a Consistent Sleep Schedule

Bedtimes and wake-times can vary from person to person, but most adults should get about seven to eight hours of quality sleep each night. Going to bed and waking up at the same time every day is a good habit that encourages healthy sleep.

Try to keep a consistent sleep schedule, even on days when you do not have to get up early. When you stay up late or sleep in, you disrupt your usual patterns of light exposure and alter your sleep cycle, which makes it more difficult to fall asleep in the future. In contrast, a regular sleep schedule trains the body to sleep at certain times.

Create a Bedtime Routine

A person’s internal clock helps their body flow through certain biological processes, including feeling alert or tired, every 24 hours. Light cues from the environment can influence the sleep cycle by altering the internal clock, making a person sleepy or keeping them awake.

When a person’s internal clock is consistently exposed to the same patterns of light and dark, they begin to feel sleepy at an appropriate time and fall asleep quickly. When they are exposed to inconsistent patterns, their internal clock becomes confused, making it harder to fall asleep. A regular bedtime routine helps train the body’s internal clock to maintain a healthy sleep cycle.

There are a number of ways to relax and unwind before bed. Many people begin their bedtime routine by lowering the lights, performing a skincare routine, bathing, or meditating. Since many other activities can help you relax as well, you may want to experiment to find what works best for you.

  • Find a relaxing playlist: Listening to music before bed may help people fall asleep faster. Create a playlist that helps you unwind and gives you a sense of comfort and positivity.
  • Read a book: Reading before bed may improve sleep quality. To avoid blue light exposure, stick to paperbacks and hardbacks or use a blue light filter on your e-reader.
  • Make a list: Spending a few minutes before bed writing detailed to-do lists may help some people reduce anxiety about the future and fall asleep more quickly.
  • Keep a journal: Writing about future events in a highly specific way may also lower anxiety and help people fall asleep faster.

Try the Military Method

First described in a book called “Relax and Win: Championship Performance,” the Military Method was developed to help U.S. Navy pilots fall asleep in under two minutes.

  1. Starting at the top of your head, relax the muscles in your face and mouth.
  2. Lower your shoulders to release tension.
  3. Let your hands fall to your sides.
  4. Relax your chest as you exhale.
  5. Relax your legs, from your thighs to your ankles.
  6. For 10 seconds, imagine a relaxing image or scene.
  7. If you cannot clear your mind through imagery, repeat “don’t think” over and over for 10 seconds.

While this method is based on basic relaxation techniques, you may need to practice it for up to six weeks before you see results.

How Long Should It Take to Fall Asleep?

Sleep needs and habits vary considerably between individuals, and there is no single amount of time to fall asleep that is considered “normal.” Sleep specialists also acknowledge that the time it takes to fall asleep cannot be used on its own to diagnose a sleep disorder. Instead, they use a combination of tests to assess patients for sleep deprivation.

If you are unsure or concerned about how long it takes you to fall asleep, consider whether you have any symptoms of sleep deprivation, such as:

  • Daytime fatigue or sleepiness
  • Difficulty getting up in the morning
  • Reduced attention span
  • Irritability, depression, or anxiety

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you may wish to discuss them with a health professional.

Frequently Asked Questions About Falling Asleep

Why Does It Take Me So Long to Fall Asleep?

Many things can make it hard to fall asleep, including caffeine use, stress, shift work, and travel. Sleep disorders can also keep people awake at night. Your healthcare provider can help you determine why it takes you a long time to fall asleep.

Why Can’t I Fall Asleep Fast?

You may have trouble falling asleep fast if you drink caffeine or alcohol before bed, if you are stressed or anxious, or if you have a sleep disorder.

Should I Take Melatonin?

Melatonin may help some people who have trouble falling asleep at a reasonable time. However, melatonin might interact with certain medications, so talk to your doctor before you try it.

References

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  4. Accessed on March 31, 2022. https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000805.htm
  5. Accessed on April 2, 2022. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31105512/
  6. Accessed on April 2, 2022. https://s.cdc.gov/niosh-science-blog/2020/06/29/sleep-hwd/
  7. Accessed on April 2, 2022. https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/all-publications-and-resources/your-guide-healthy-sleep
  8. Accessed on April 2, 2022. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31102877/
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  12. Accessed on April 3, 2022. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24755569/
  13. Accessed on April 3, 2022. https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000874.htm
  14. Accessed on April 3, 2022. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30575050/
  15. Accessed on April 25, 2022. https://www.cordem.org/globalassets/files/academic-assembly/2017-aa/handouts/day-three/biofeedback-exercises-for-stress-2—fernances-j.pdf
  16. Accessed on April 25, 2022. https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/emres/longhourstraining/color.html
  17. Accessed on April 25, 2022. https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/emres/longhourstraining/light.html
  18. Accessed on April 25, 2022. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34030534/
  19. Accessed on April 25, 2022. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31890092/
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  23. Accessed on April 25, 2022. https://medium.com/an-idea/relax-and-win-summary-de1f8ad5bace
  24. Accessed on April 25, 2022. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/quantifying-sleepiness
  25. Accessed on April 25, 2022. https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/natural/940.html
People also ask
More FAQs for how to fall asleep fast
  • How to fall asleep fast?

    If you want to learn how to fall asleep fast, you have to make sleep a priority. If you try to fit sleep in after you’ve done everything else in your day, then you run the risk of never training your body’s natural clock to fall asleep when it needs to.

    How to Fall Asleep Fast
  • How to fall asleep fast with the military method?

    Here’s how to fall asleep fast with the military method. Sit or lay down on your bed, slowly relaxing the muscles in your body. Beginning with your face, tense your muscles then allow them to loosen naturally. Begin to take deep, calming breaths.

    Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder, with up to 30% of adults reporting short-term sleep issues. But if you’ve been up at night wondering how to fall asleep fast, it might be affecting you even more than you realize. 

    Failing to fall asleep isn’t only frustrating — the anxiety from not being able to sleep can actually make it even harder to fall asleep in the future. So how can you stop this domino effect to successfully catch some zzz’s?

    1. Try The Military Method

    The military method is a technique that focuses on muscle relaxation, breathing, and mental visualization. Here’s how to fall asleep fast with the military method. 

    1. Sit or lay down on your bed, slowly relaxing the muscles in your body.
    2. Beginning with your face, tense your muscles then allow them to loosen naturally. Begin to take deep, calming breaths. 
    3. Repeat this process until your entire body feels completely at ease. 
    4. Push all thoughts from your head for 10 seconds. When your brain feels clear, picture one of the following scenarios:
      1. Peacefully lying in a canoe on a calm lake
      2. Gently rocking back and forth in a completely dark room
    5. If the above is unsuccessful, mentally repeat “don’t think, don’t think, don’t think” for at least 10 seconds, and try again. 

    2. Use The 4-7-8 Method

    The 4-7-8 method is based on Pranayama, a traditional yoga technique. This method can help ease anxiety and lull you into a state of calm. In the 4-7-8 technique, you focus on counting to distract yourself from feelings of anxiety. Here’s how to sleep faster with the 4-7-8 method.

    1. While laying down in bed, allow your tongue to relax behind your front teeth, resting on the roof of your mouth. 
    2. Slowly exhale all of your breath through your mouth, completely emptying your lungs. 
    3. Breath in through your nose for 4 seconds, hold your breath for 7 seconds, then exhale for 8 seconds.
    4. Repeat this process at least four times. 

    3. Try to Stay Awake

    An unexpected strategy for trying to fall asleep fast is actually to try to stay awake. While it may sound counterintuitive, trying to stay awake can help you lessen the anxiety around trying to fall asleep.

    Since falling asleep is an involuntary process, taking your mind off of the task at hand can give your brain the break it needs for you to stop counting sheep. 

    4. Turn Down Your Tech

    Illustration of phone on top of pillows

    With the prevalence of modern technology, surfing the internet before bed is more of a given than a question. While it can be tough to turn off your tech, looking at your screen before bed can negatively impact your quality of sleep. Many devices emit a blue light that simulates sunlight — and while this is helpful before your morning coffee, it can do more harm than good when trying to hit the hay. 

    If you’re not able to completely part with your devices for an hour before bed, consider turning down your tech instead. Try listening to music, a calming podcast, or an audiobook for screen-free entertainment while you get ready for bed. 

    5. Don’t Worry If You Don’t Fall Asleep Instantly

    Is it possible to fall asleep in five minutes? Many people make the mistake of trying to fall asleep almost instantly, but going from wide awake to snoozing isn’t always like flipping off a switch. 

    Instead, start to wind down around an hour before bedtime, slowly setting up a sleep-friendly environment in your bedroom by dimming your lights and relaxing your body. 

    6. Try Autogenic Training

    Autogenic training is a relaxation method created by Johannes Heinrich Schultz, a German psychiatrist. Based on the principles of hypnosis, autogenic training uses a series of statements to create a calming effect in your nervous system. Here’s how to fall asleep fast with autogenic training methods.

    1. Lay down and bring focus to your breath, saying to yourself, “I am completely calm.”
    2. Bring your focus to your arms and repeat to yourself, “My arms are very heavy,” then, “I am completely calm,” at least six times. 
    3. Move your focus to your legs and repeat to yourself, “My legs are very heavy,” then, “I am completely calm,” at least six times. 
    4. Move around to different parts of your body, such as your abdomen, forehead, and heart, repeating the above phrases at least six times. 
    5. Once you feel relaxed, begin to shift your attention to your entire body, where you should then feel relaxed and warm.
    6. Repeat the above steps until you’re ready, at which point you can open your eyes (if you haven’t yet fallen asleep) and enjoy the state of calm. 

    7. Do a Body Scan

    While a body scan might sound a bit medical-grade, it’s actually an easy relaxation technique you can do before bed to promote better sleep. A body scan is a check-in with yourself and your body that you can do by bringing awareness and intention to each part of your body. 

    Similar to the military method, a body scan focuses on one section of the body at a time until you feel completely relaxed. However, with a body scan, you move at a very slow rate throughout your body, taking 10 to 20 minutes to reach the tips of your feet.

    1. Lay down in a relaxed and comfortable position.
    2. Beginning with your head, focus on one section of your body until it feels completely relaxed.
    3. Move down to your shoulders, allowing them to relax before progressing down the right side of your body. 
    4. Once your right side feels relaxed, begin focusing on the left side of your body. 
    5. After 10 to 20 minutes, check in with your body to see if you feel completely relaxed. 

    8. Take A Warm Bath or Shower

    Illustration of man taking a bath with soap and plants in the foreground

    A warm soak has long since been known as a remedy after a long day. But did you know that taking a warm bath or shower is shown to help you fall asleep 36% faster? 

    Next time you think you might be up counting sheep, step into the tub for a nice and relaxing soak. Taking time for a hot bath or shower can also improve your quality of sleep — even during warm weather. 

    9. Do Progressive Muscle Relaxation

    Similar to body scanning, progressive muscle relaxation involves focusing on different areas of your body to put yourself in a relaxed state. However, with progressive muscle relaxation, you tense different muscle groups a few times before allowing them to relax. 

    1. Raise your eyebrows to tighten your forehead muscles, then allow them to relax, focusing on the release of tension from the temples.
    2. Squeeze your eyes shut, then allow them to relax, focusing on how your eyelids fall over your eyes. 
    3. Smile to feel tension in your cheeks and jaw, then allow them to relax, focusing on how each muscle interacts within your face.
    4. Repeat this process through the rest of your body, moving through muscle groups in the shoulders, arms, abdomen, and legs, before finishing at your feet. 
    5. Lay in this relaxed position until you doze off to sleep. 

    10. Meditate Before Bed

    Research has shown that meditation can actually be a powerful way to overcome insomnia. By taking time before bed to meditate, you can clear your mind of the stresses of the day and focus only on the present moment. Use the below method to meditate before you go to bed.

    1. Sit or lie down in a comfortable position. 
    2. Close your eyes, slow your breathing, and focus on deeply inhaling and exhaling. 
    3. Clear your mind of thoughts. If you feel thoughts intruding, push them away by refocusing your breathing.
    4. Start with as little as five minutes of meditation, working your way up to longer periods as it feels comfortable. 

    11. Practice Imagery

    Illustration of a lake with rolling hills

    Imagery is a mental exercise you can do to calm your senses before bed. To practice imagery, picture a peaceful and happy image from your past and try to “paint” the picture in your mind, down to the very smallest details.

    This mental exercise will engage your brain and focus your attention on your chosen image, promoting relaxation and putting you in a state of calm. 

    12. Avoid Caffeine Up to Six Hours Prior

    While caffeine may be the MVP for getting you out of bed, it’s also a major culprit in keeping you from falling asleep. So how long before bedtime should you be avoiding your daily cup of joe? 

    Research has shown that caffeine can impact your quality of sleep up to six hours before bedtime — so if you typically sleep at around 10 pm,  you should probably be finishing up your last cup before 4 pm. 

    To get your drink fix before bed, opt for a decaffeinated drink like calming chamomile or lavender tea to satisfy your cravings without sacrificing your sleep. 

    13. Create a Bedtime Routine

    Creating a consistent bedtime routine can help you set your internal body clock so you know when to wind down for the night. Your bedtime routine can be as simple as playing a pre-bedtime playlist or taking a nightly bath — what matters is that your routine works for you.

    Your bedtime routine should be catered to your self-care preferences. There’s no one specific bedtime routine that works for everyone, but if you stick to a simple nightly ritual, your body will thank you for it. 

    14. Keep the Thermostat Low

    Do you ever feel like you spend your whole night trying to flip to the cold side of the pillow? While you might think sleeping in a warm environment would keep you restful and cozy, it’s actually better to sleep in a cool room. 

    The ideal temperature for sleep is between 60 and 67 degrees Fahrenheit. While it might feel too cold for comfort during the day, your internal temperature drops at night as an internal signal that it’s time to sleep, meaning a cooler room provides the right situation for better quality sleep. 

    15. Dim the Lights With a Glow Light

    Light is an important signal that tells your body what “mode” to be in. While bright lights like blue light are great for keeping you alert, ambient yellow-toned light can help signal to your body that it’s time to turn in.

    Using a dimming light, like a glow light, can help your body gradually relax into a sleep-ready state. For the best results, start dimming your lights slowly after dinner, until you’re ready for bed in your dark, cozy haven. 

    16. Do Yoga Before Bed

    Illustration of a woman in childs pose

    If you end the day feeling restless, a bit of calming yoga can be the reset your body needs to wind down before bed. Studies have shown that yoga before bed has helped people with insomnia improve their sleep quality by helping them fall asleep faster and sleep for longer. 

    Yoga is a great way to relax your mind and your body by encouraging deep breathing and muscle relaxation. Next time you’re trying to fall asleep, consider spending a few minutes in child’s pose or happy baby first to get yourself ready to catch some zzz’s. 

    17. Put Socks On

    If you’re struggling to fall asleep and don’t know why, you might be getting cold feet — literally. Research has shown that when your feet are cold, your blood vessels constrict, causing less blood to circulate and sending signals to your brain to stay awake. 

    Putting on a pair of socks before bed can help the blood vessels in your feet dilate, sending signals to your brain that it’s time for some sweet dreams. 

    18. Take a Walk

    Can’t stay still at night? Try taking a walk (kind of). While it may sound counterintuitive, getting up at night and moving to another area of your home for a few minutes can reset your brain so you’re not lying in bed restlessly waiting for respite. 

    If you’re still struggling to fall asleep after 20 minutes, it might be time to do a quick reset. Just try to keep your nighttime stroll to around five to 10 minutes, making sure not to do anything jarring like turning on a bright light or causing a loud sound. 

    19. Use a Weighted Blanket

    Weighted blankets are heavy blankets used as a form of pressure therapy to create a calming effect and help stimulate the release of serotonin in your brain. The ideal weighted blanket is around 10% of your body weight, since the blanket applies enough pressure that you’re calm and relaxed without feeling too restricted. 

    Whether you use a weighted blanket during your pre-bedtime ritual or throughout the night, your body will surely thank you for it.

    20. Turn off the Clock

    When you’re struggling to sleep at night, looking at your clock can further compound your sleep anxiety. Try turning off your clock, or turning it around so you can’t see the time at night. 

    Additionally, make sure your phone is placed face down if you keep it by your bed. That way, you won’t be as tempted to check the time — or go on a late night web-surfing binge. 

    Set Yourself Up For Success

    A good night’s sleep does wonders for you, both mentally and physically. But if you’re having trouble falling asleep, the anxiety that triggers can actually make it even harder to catch some zzz’s.

    Whether you do progressive muscle relaxation or start dimming the lights after dinner, set yourself up for a great night’s sleep with a soft and supportive mattress for the sleep of your dreams. 

    How to Fall Asleep Fast: 20 Tips to Beat ...
  • Do you need a trick to fall asleep?

    You do not need a special substance or ‘trick’ to fall asleep. The need to sleep is ingrained in your DNA. Every person has a specific amount of sleep that they require. You cannot force yourself to sleep if you have already slept enough. Similarly, you cannot sleep less than what your body requires.

    *I recommend proofreading your website.

    Sleeping Tips to Help You Fall Asleep Fast
Guided Sleep Meditation - Fall Asleep Fast - YouTube

BLACK SCREEN Relaxing Guided Meditation so you can FALL ASLEEP FAST with this guided meditation for sleep. Make sure to listen it often so you can get the ha...

26 Weird Ways to Fall Asleep Fast

01-11-2017 · Keep the lights low while you work. 12. Put a Pillow Under Your Knees. If you lie on your back and put a pillow under your knees this will help your spine relax into a natural and comfortable …

01-11-2017

I have received information and materials from ©Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. 2017. The opinions stated are my own. This is a sponsored post. #ForBetterTomorrows #BetterTomorrows #FallBack #CollectiveBias

Since Zander was born I have felt tired more often than not. I have written posts about dealing with the newborn sleepless nights, how to fall asleep and what to do when you are constantly sleep deprived. Motherhood and not sleeping are not a great combination. If I don’t get a good nights sleep I usually stay at home all day the next day and feel lazy. When I get a good nights sleep I have energy to get out of the house and do fun things with my kids, I am happier and more patient, and more likely to be active. I have noticed since becoming a mom that falling asleep is a little easier than it used to be, because I am so tired. But my active mind and sore back and shoulders often keep me awake long after I have turned the lights out.

10 Ways to Beat Insomnia | Rachael Burgess

There is nothing as frustrating as being so tired you can barely keep your eyes open, but still be unable to sleep. Over the years I have developed some ‘sleep hacks’ that help me fall asleep super fast. Some of them are a little weird, but they actually work!

26 Ways to Fall Asleep Fast

1. Watch TV

Everyone says turn off your devices before bed, but for me watching TV on my phone always puts me out. I turn on a show and prop it up on a pillow next to me and tell myself I am going to watch the whole episode and not fall asleep. Usually half way through I have to turn my head to get comfortable and so I end up just listening to the show instead of watching it. I almost never make it through a whole episode of TV show.

2. Schedule Tomorrow Before Bed

Sometimes I can’t fall asleep because I have a lot on my to do list. Scheduling my week ahead of time really helps me fall asleep because I don’t lay in bed wondering if I will remember to do this or that. Planning the next day is usually the last thing I do before going to sleep.

3. Try Staying Awake

Oddly, trying to stay awake can sometimes trick your brain into falling asleep. It happens to me all the time. I lay in bed and tell myself that in two minutes I am going to get up and do the dishes, laundry, etc. Next thing I know I am dreaming.

4. Relocate

If you stay at our house and find me sleeping on the couch or in the guest room it probably isn’t because Kris and I are fighting. If I can’t fall asleep I switch to a new bed/couch and often that is enough to help me relax. I have no idea why this works so well, but I often will lay in bed awake for an hour and then move to the couch and fall asleep in five minutes.

5. Treat Sore Muscles

One of the biggest reasons I can’t fall asleep is because of sore muscles. I get really bad back and shoulder pain from typing too much and carrying Zander around. After complaining about it a lot Kris mentioned that I should try taking something. I found some TYLENOL® PM at Walgreens and it does the trick surprisingly well. It helps if you take it half hour before you want to go to bed on days where your muscles are especially sore. It is a non habit forming sleep aid, I hardly notice the effects, it just helps you fall asleep very naturally.

How to Make a Website for your Hobby | Rachael Burgess

6. Take a Hot Bath

Sitting in the hot tub or a hot bath is another great way to relax sore muscles before bed. I find the combination of a hot bath and TYLENOL® PM to be especially effective when my muscles are really sore. I fall asleep almost instantly after this routine.

7. Lower the Lights

Lowering the lights helps encourage your body to produce melatonin, the body’s natural sleep hormone. I light candles and turn the lights low when I am trying to unwind at the end of the day.

8. Sleep Upside Down

This is similar to moving to a new bed or the couch. If you don’t have a guest room or couch to move to, try turning around and putting your head at the foot of the bed. Kris is always surprised to wake up with my feet beside him when I do this, but it works so….

9. Try Box Breathing

This simple relaxation technique is really helpful in falling asleep. To do box breathing breath in deeply for four counts, then hold your breath in for four counts, breath out slowly for four counts and then hold for four counts before breathing in again.

10. Read a Book

Turn the lights low and read a book in bed, preferably a long, somewhat boring and descriptive novel that requires you to pay attention. If your body is really tired then this should make your eyes start involuntarily closing.

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11. Clean the House

Sometimes getting up and moving around is all you need to be able to fall asleep. If you have been laying in bed for awhile and are feeling restless, get up and do something not fun like cleaning the house. Go back to bed as soon as you feel ready. Keep the lights low while you work.

12. Put a Pillow Under Your Knees

If you lie on your back and put a pillow under your knees this will help your spine relax into a natural and comfortable position. It not only helps you fall asleep, it also helps reduce sore muscles from sleeping in a bad position.

13. Exercise

Science shows that people who exercise (especially first thing in the morning) sleep better at night! I am not great at this, but I do notice the days I exercise I fall asleep way faster.

14. Splash Your Face in Cold Water

There is this weird thing called the mammalian diver reflex that happens when you put your face in cold water. Basically it makes the blood in your body flow mainly to your vital organs, which decreases your heart rate and blood pressure. This helps you relax and fall asleep. The water only needs to be colder than the surrounding air for this to work.

15. Turn on White Noise

When I was a kid noises in the house really bothered me. I would hear the floor creak downstairs and immediately have to run check it out. I started sleeping with a fan on so I couldn’t hear noises in the house and that is when I discovered the power of white noise! It is very relaxing and helps calm your thoughts and encourage sleep.

10 Ways to Beat Insomnia | Rachael Burgess

16. Turn Down the Thermostat

Sleeping in a cool space can help you sleep faster, better and longer. The inclination to get cozy under the covers when it is cold makes you feel more comfortable in your bed.

17. Make Your Room Pitch Black

Even small lights like an alarm clock or TV sleep light can keep you up at night. Make sure all lights are gone from your sleep space.

18. Rock Yourself to Sleep

Rocking isn’t just for babies! If you have a rocking chair sit in it, close your eyes and rock for a few minutes! You will probably feel funny doing it, but if it helps you sleep, who cares!

19. Breath Through One Nostril

This is another weird one that really helps! Plug your left nostril with your finger and breath slowly and deeply through your right nostril, feel your body begin to instantly relax!

20. Sleep Naked

This works the same as turning the thermostat down. If you are cooler you will likely sleep better. Also sometimes PJ’s can make you uncomfortable and inhibit sleep. So get rid of them!

21. Don’t Be Afraid to use Tylenol PM

Using TYLENOL® PM can help you sleep when sore muscles prevent you from finding rest! It is non habit forming and effective. I reserve use of TYLENOL® PM for when my muscles are really sore and I can’t sleep. I only need it once every week or two and it is so helpful!

22. Tense All Your Muscles

While you lie in bed try tensing and releasing the muscles in your legs, abdomen, back and arms. This releases pent up energy and can distract from any discomfort that was making it difficult for you to sleep.

23. Stretch Before Bed

Before you go to bed try stretching. This can help release tension in your muscles and also is a way to tire out your body just a little bit more before sleep.

24. Go Outside

Sometimes a breath of fresh air helps clear your mind and relax your body. Plus if it is winter or fall the cold air will get you excited to run back inside and curl up in bed.

25. Mentally Review your Day

Go over the events of the day and play them in your mind. Don’t analyze them, just play each moment as if you were watching a movie of your life in your mind. If you had a particularly stressful or exciting day don’t do this, this works best on an average, boring day.

26. Stay Awake & Schedule a Nap

If all else fails, just stay awake and do something productive! Schedule in a nap for the next day. If I can tell nothing is going to help me sleep, I would rather accomplish something productive then toss and turn for hours. I can always nap the next day!

10 Ways to Beat Insomnia | Rachael Burgess

When I get enough sleep I notice a huge difference in my life. I am able to remember things better, I am more productive in the mornings, I am less cranky with my family. Sleeping well also helps maintain a healthy weight and gives you enough energy to exercise and stay active!

Right now you can get

.50 off TYLENOL® PM 100 count (regularly .99) with your Walgreens card, valid 11/5-11/11. Head to Walgreens now so next time aches and pains keep you up at night you will be prepared! Check out TYLENOL® PM on Facebook and YouTube for more information and follow them to stay up to date on coupons and promotions.

Keep scrolling for more pictures or…

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TYLENOL® PM contains a pain reliever and nighttime sleep aid. ©Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. 2017 The third party trademarks used herein are trademarks of their respective owners.

10 Ways to Beat Insomnia | Rachael Burgess10 Ways to Beat Insomnia | Rachael Burgess 10 Ways to Beat Insomnia | Rachael Burgess 10 Ways to Beat Insomnia | Rachael Burgess 10 Ways to Beat Insomnia | Rachael Burgess 10 Ways to Beat Insomnia | Rachael Burgess 10 Ways to Beat Insomnia | Rachael Burgess 10 Ways to Beat Insomnia | Rachael Burgess

How to Fall Asleep Fast? (28 Simple Ways)

23-05-2022 · 18. Do Yoga Before Bed. If you’re tired at the end of the day, a little yoga can help your body relax before going to bed to go to sleep. People who have insomnia can get better sleep if they do …

23-05-2022

If you have ever had trouble sleeping, you may wonder how to get to sleep more quickly. While your unique traits and needs can impact your sleep, there are some things you can do to help you get a good night’s sleep more quickly.

Relaxation is the best way to fall asleep quickly. The body and mind need to be calm before they can fall asleep. We’ll talk about activities that can help you sleep, like meditation, breathing exercises, and relaxation therapy.

The Fastest Way to Sleep?

What’s the problem with attempting to sleep rather than getting some rest? You’re not the only one. The thoughts are awakened by working too hard, which might generate (or continue) a cycle of anxiety and nervousness.

While it may be challenging for your body to follow if you can’t get to sleep, the opposite is true. However, there are proven methods for flipping the switch and safely shutting down your body.

You might use scientific tricks to put your body into a safe shutdown phase. We’ll go through several tried-and-true methods for accelerating the process of winding down for bed.

It’s essential to keep in mind that while the following techniques take 120 seconds to complete or help you fall asleep faster, only the final 10 seconds are required to allow yourself to fall asleep.

1. The Military Method

The famous military method, which Sharon Ackerman initially published in the book “Relax and Win: Championship Performance.

According to Ackerman, the United States Navy Pre-Flight School came up with a way to help pilots take naps in two minutes or less. For about six weeks, the pilots practiced their skills. Even though they were drinking coffee and listening to gunshots in the background, they could still get it right. People who need to rest while sitting up can use this method.

Breathing and muscle relaxation are the cornerstones of the military approach, and there is some scientific proof that they can help you. The efficiency of this strategy may also be hindered by illnesses such as ADHD or anxiety.

2. Use the 4-7-8 Method

The 4-7-8 method demands you to focus on counting to divert yourself from anxiousness. The 4-7-8 approach is a simple way to get to sleep more quickly.

Pranayama, a traditional yoga technique, is the foundation of the 4-7-8 system. According to the research, it can help you fall asleep faster by reducing anxiety and lulling you into a state of peace.

3. Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR)

Progressive muscle relaxation, often called deep muscle relaxation, is a muscle relaxation technique. The idea is to tense your muscles — but not too much — and then relax to let the stress go. This movement brings calmness to your entire body. It’s a tried-and-true method for overcoming insomnia.

Before you start, consider practicing the 4-7-8 approach while envisioning the stress leaving your body as you exhale.

Relaxation Script

Keep your mind on how your body feels when you’re calm and relaxed and not stressed out.

4. Meditation

Meditation techniques that help you get a good night’s sleep may help you fall asleep faster. Mindfulness meditation, in particular, has shown promising results when it comes to improving your sleep.

Critical ideas for meditation that are called “mindfulness” are to bring about relaxation by paying attention to the present and letting go of judgment. When mindfulness is practiced at bedtime, it may help people stop ruminating and let go of negative emotions to go to sleep.

A 2014 study indicated that mindfulness meditation helped persons with chronic insomnia sleep better and spend less time awake. Beginners may find it difficult to relax at first. With practice, you can relax and fall asleep faster. Consult your doctor if you have a history of trauma or meditation that brings up painful or uncomfortable thoughts.

These relaxation techniques aren’t the only way to help you sleep faster. You can also get regular exercise, take a warm bath or shower before bed, use essential oil aromatherapy, or write down your thoughts and worries.

5. Try Autogenic Training

Developed by German Psychiatrist Johannes Heinrich Schultz, autogenic training is a method of calming the mind. Autogenic training, based on hypnosis principles, uses a succession of phrases to induce a relaxing effect. Here’s how to use autogenic training to fall asleep quickly:

It has been found that autogenic training can help with many physical and emotional problems, including anxiety, the US Department of Veterans Affairs says. When you do this, you can fall asleep faster.

6. Take a Warm Bath or Shower

Your body temperature changes as you sleep in the middle of the night. Cools down when you are lying down and warms up again when you get up. This is how your body works.

In a too-hot room, you might have a hard time sleeping. If you set your thermostat to 60–67°F (15.6–19.4°C), it could help. People have different tastes, so find the temperature that fits best for you.

If you want to speed up the body’s temperature changes, you could also take a warm bath or shower. As your body cools down, this can tell your brain to go to sleep.

In one study, people who took a hot bath or shower before bed were more efficient and had a better night’s worth of sleep. In this case, “sleep efficiency” refers to how much time you spend asleep in bed instead of lying awake.

A few hours before going to bed, people who took a shower or bath that was between 104°F and 108.5°F (40.0°C and 42.5°C) had good things happen to them. There were benefits to their sleep even if they took a short bath or shower. A lot more study is needed, but these results are promising.

7. Try to Stay Awake

One unusual method of falling asleep quickly is to try to stay awake. Although an unplanned all-nighter isn’t ideal, worrying about your sleep won’t help you sleep better. It may seem counterintuitive, but staying awake can reduce your anxiety about falling asleep.

Try not to look at your phone or turn on any bright lights. Instead, consider the following: To stop counting sheep, give your mind a break it needs by taking your attention away from the task at hand.

8. Peaceful Music

A noisy environment can hinder rapid sleep. Listening to relaxing music might help you relax and filter out unwanted noises15. Make a playlist that corresponds to a 10-to-20-minute sleep latencies window and listen to it every night to establish a rhythm. If music is too distracting, some recommend white noise for sleep16.

9. Guided Imagery

Recalling a tranquil memory or visualizing a peaceful scene can help you reduce and prepare your mind and body for sleep. To immerse oneself in an imagined environment, take slow, deep breaths and concentrate on sensory elements such as sights, sounds, and scents.

You might find it beneficial to direct your thoughts with a pre-recorded soundtrack. Soundtracks for guided imagery are freely available on the internet.

10. Avoid Caffeine Up to Six Hours Prior

Caffeine may be the hero for getting you out of bed, but it’s also a big no-no for going asleep. So, how long should you avoid your regular cup of java before going to bed?

Caffeine has been shown to affect sleep quality up to six hours before bedtime, so if you usually go to bed around 10 p.m., you should finish your last cup by 4 p.m.

Be aware of caffeine sources that aren’t expected. It can even make you tired if you drink too much coffee. Decaffeinated teas like chamomile or lavender can help you get your drink fixed before bed without sacrificing your sleep.

11. Get on a schedule

Many people find that setting a sleep cycle helps them sleep. The circadian rhythm is your body telling you what to do. During the day, your body should be alert but tired at night. This internal clock tells your body what to do.

This can stay on track if you wake up and go to bed simultaneously every day. Before long, your body will be able to fall asleep and wake up at the same time every day.

Getting 7 to 9 hours of sleep each night is also essential. (the ideal amount of time for adults to sleep).

Before you go to bed at night, give yourself greater than 30 minutes to get ready to sleep. This lets your body and mind relax and get ready to go to sleep so that you can go to sleep.

12. Turn Down Your Technology

Modern technology means that going online before going to bed is more of a given than something to think about, not something to question. Looking at your screen before you go to bed can make it hard to get a good night’s sleep.

During the day, many objects emit a blue light that looks like sunlight. This can help you wake up, but it can also keep you awake at night.

If you can’t give up your gadgets for an hour before you go to bed, you might want to turn down your tech instead.

If you have trouble turning off your device’s screen at night, check the settings to see if a night mode is available. The screen’s colors will generally be warmer, reducing the blue light’s impact on sleep.

13. A Bedtime Routine

A routine signals the body when it is time for sleep. Pre-bedtime practices can be complicated or straightforward, depending on an individual schedule and preferences.

Getting to bed and waking up simultaneously each day is the most fantastic strategy. Other steps in a nightly routine may include:

According to one study, bathing 1–2 hours before bedtime helped participants fall asleep 10 minutes faster than usual. After a warm bath or shower, the body cools down, and the brain recognizes that it is time to sleep.

14. Sleep Restriction Therapy

This method is frequently used in conjunction with stimuli control therapy. Sleep restriction therapy involves adjusting the amount of time spent in bed to meet the individual’s sleep requirements.

Those who stay in bed for 9 hours but only rest for seven should not stay in bed for longer than 7 hours.

Individuals should start by keeping a sleeping diary to determine how much sleep they receive on average. Add 30 minutes to the average sleep time to account for falling asleep time.

When implementing sleep restriction therapy, working with a doctor or health care professional can be beneficial.

15. Don’t Worry If You Don’t Fall Asleep Instantly

Is it even possible to fall asleep in just five minutes, or is it impossible? It’s not always as simple as turning off a switch to fall asleep. Many people waste time trying to fall asleep right away.

Instead, begin to wind down an hour before going to bed. You can start by:

16. Experience both Daylight and Darkness

Light can change your body’s internal clock, telling you when to sleep and wake up. It can be hard to fall asleep and stay up if you don’t get enough light at the correct times.

During the day, bright light tells your body to stay alert. Natural daylight and artificial light can make you less alert.

At night, the darkness makes people feel tired. Research shows that when it’s dark, the body makes melatonin, which is essential for sleep. Because the body doesn’t make melatonin during the day, it doesn’t make much of it.

Get outside and expose your body to sunlight or bright light. You can use window coverings to make your room dark at night.

17. Avoid Naps during the Day

Insomniacs are generally tired due to inadequate nighttime sleep, leading to daytime napping. While brief naps have been related to increased alertness and wellbeing, the effects of napping on nighttime sleep are controversial.

According to some research, research indicates that long (at least 2 hours) and late naps may contribute to poor nightly sleep quality and possibly sleep deprivation.

In a study of 440 college students, individuals who took three or more naps per week, napped for more than two hours, and napped late had the worst quality of night sleep (between 6 p.m. and 9 p.m.).

A 1996 study indicated that napping older individuals had poorer quality sleep, more depressive symptoms, and less physical activity. Individuals were also more likely to be overweight than non-nappers.

Recent high school students’ research found that daytime napping reduced sleep duration and efficiency. Other research shows naps don’t alter nocturnal sleep.

To see if naps impact your sleep, try removing them or restricting them to a 30-minute nap early in the day.

18. Do Yoga Before Bed

If you’re tired at the end of the day, a little yoga can help your body relax before going to bed to go to sleep. People who have insomnia can get better sleep if they do yoga before going to bed. This helps them fall asleep faster and stay asleep longer.

Yoga is a great way to relax both your body and your mind. It encourages deep breathing and muscle relaxation, which can help you feel calmer. You might want to spend a few minutes in a child’s pose or as a happy baby before you try to fall asleep next time. This will help you get ready to go to sleep.

19. Practice Sleep Hygiene

Sleep Hygiene” refers to daily routines designed to promote restful sleep at night. Common sleep hygiene behaviors include:

Make sure your bed is only used for sleeping to start with good sleep hygiene. Cozy up on the couch until it’s time to go to bed instead of a bed.

20. Increase Sunlight Exposure

Increasing your exposure to intense light or getting more sunlight throughout the day can help you fall asleep quicker at night. Bright light, according to research, can assist regulate your circadian rhythm, which is how your body determines when it’s time to sleep and wake up.

Make sure you get outside for a few minutes each day and keep your bedroom dark in the evenings to take advantage of this. This replicates sunrise and sunset, so once you start decreasing your lights, your body will realize it’s time to sleep.

21. Eat Carbs at Night

Preparation is required for this technique. However, consuming carbs four hours before bedtime helped people sleep better and faster. The study focused on simple carbs, which are easily digested.

White rice, white bread, white spaghetti, and potatoes (as well as sugary foods). Interestingly, a Japanese study revealed no sleep advantages from bread or noodles. Even if you are attempting to reduce carbs, a dish at dinner may be suitable for your sleep.

Keep meals simple and limited in size to avoid indigestion. The study found that eating carbs four hours before bedtime was more efficient than eating them an hour before. Also, spicy foods can hinder your ability to fall asleep quickly.

22. The Right Timing for Better Sleep

Because circadian dislocation can make it difficult to fall and stay asleep, it’s critical to time your light exposure. The asleep routine supports your circadian rhythm if you want to get more energy during the day.

Follow this circadian-friendly exposure to light and sleep schedule guidelines to make it easier to get all the sleep your body requires.

Be Consistent

Consistency is essential for your circadian rhythm, so stick to a schedule. This includes weekends. While staying up late on a Friday night or sleeping later on a Sunday morning may seem harmless, disrupting your circadian rhythm can make it difficult to wake up or fall asleep on time the following week. So, try to maintain a regular sleep routine.

To avoid increasing sleep latency at night, snooze during your afternoon drop and limit your nap to 90 minutes (the length of a complete sleep cycle). This software will advise you when to go for your daily afternoon dip.

Wake Up to the Sun

Reveal yourself to daylight as quickly as possible after waking up. As a last resort, sunlight through a window will suffice, although walking outside is preferable. Taking yourself out for an early walk or run is even better because physical exercise during the day can help you sleep better at night.

Go Dark at Night

Light exposure at night can affect your body’s natural melatonin production, so avoid it for 90 minutes before bed. Bright lights and blue light from electronics can be harmful. So dim or turn off your lights and wear blue-light-blocking glasses. And turn out all lights in your room! Use eye masks and blackout shades.

Aim for Your Melatonin Window

The pineal gland begins producing melatonin 2-3 hours before your natural bedtime. This is the start of your Melatonin Window in the RISE app. Going to bed during this period will help you fall asleep faster because your body creates the most melatonin. Miss the window, and you’ll have trouble falling and staying asleep.

23. Try a New Sleeping Position

We all know how hard it is to fall asleep when you’re not comfortable. If you’re having trouble sleeping, it might be time to change how you sleep.

For example, people who sleep on their sides can get hurt if they aren’t adequately supported. If you usually sleep on your side and have to move around to get comfortable, try to sleep on your back.

24. Turn off the Clock

When you have anxiety about getting to sleep at night, looking at your clock can worsen. You might want to turn off your clock at night or turn it around so you can’t see the time.

Place your phone face down and wear a sleep mask to block all light and noise. It will make it less likely for you to check the time or go on a late-night web surfing binge.

25. Visualize Things that Make you Happy

Rather than worrying about stressful things, picture a place that makes you happy and calm. When people were told to use an imagery distraction in a study on insomnia, they could fall asleep more quickly than when they were told not to.

They used this method to keep their minds occupied with good thoughts instead of worrying and worrying about things before they went to sleep.

A picture or focus on what makes you feel good can take your mind off the things that keep you awake at night and make it easier to fall asleep.

26. Read Something

In the evening, reading could be a good way for you to wind down. Bedtime reading may help children get a good night’s sleep. You should also know the difference between reading an eBook and a paper book.

Electronic books eject blue light, making you less likely to make melatonin. People who have less melatonin in their bodies have a hard time getting to sleep and are more likely to be tired the next day.

So, it’s best to read from an actual book to relieve stress and improve your sleep.

27. Practice Writing before Bed

Some people have trouble sleeping because their minds go round and round. This has been known to cause anxiety, tension, and sleep disturbances.

Journaling and positive thinking can help you relax and sleep better. Writing down happy occurrences throughout the day can increase feelings of appreciation and happiness, reduce tension, and help you relax before bedtime.

A study of 41 college students revealed that writing increased sleep time and enhanced sleep quality. Set aside 15 minutes every night to reflect on your day. It’s vital to remember the good things and how you felt.

A different study found that drafting a to-do list for 5 minutes helped young adults fall asleep faster than journaling.

28. Take a Walk

At night, can’t stay still. Try going for a walk (kind of). Isn’t it weird that getting up at night and moving to another part of your house for a few minutes can help your brain get back to normal?

If you can’t fall asleep after 20 minutes, it might be a moment to do a quick reset and try again. You should only go for a short walk for about five to 10 minutes at night. Make sure you don’t disturb anything like turn on a bright light or make a loud noise.

29. Put Socks On

If you’re having trouble falling asleep for no apparent reason, you might be experiencing cold feet – literally. According to research, your blood vessels contract when your feet are chilly, causing less blood to flow and sending signals to your brain to stay awake.

Wearing socks before bed will help warm your feet and cause your feet’s blood vessels to dilate, signaling to your brain that it’s time for some sweet dreams.

The Bottom Line

If you still have difficulties sleeping after making these modifications, talk to a healthcare practitioner. You could have a sleep issue or another underlying condition that prevents you from sleeping well. Your doctor can assist you in identifying the problem and developing a treatment plan with you.

Using the tactics outlined above can assist you in falling asleep quickly, sleeping well, and having more enthusiasm the next day.

Also Read: How to Make an Air Mattress More Comfortable

References

  1. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/ways-to-fall-asleep#2.-Use-the-4-7-8-breathing-method
  2. https://www.healthline.com/health/healthy-sleep/fall-asleep-fast#120-secs-to-sleep
  3. https://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleep-hygiene/how-to-fall-asleep-fast
  4. https://casper.com/blog/how-to-fall-asleep-fast/
  5. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/how-to-fall-asleep-fast#other-tips
  6. https://www.sleepassociation.org/about-sleep/how-to-fall-asleep/
  7. https://health.clevelandclinic.org/if-you-fall-asleep-instantly-is-that-a-good-thing-2/
  8. https://www.risescience.com/blog/how-to-fall-asleep-faster
  9. https://amerisleep.com/blog/falling-asleep-quickly/

Also Read: How to Make a Pillow?

Healthy Tips on Fall Asleep Fast and Well - How To Improve Sleep

21-10-2021 · How does it (4-7-8 method) work for fall asleep fast; Open the mouth slightly Put the tip of the tongue after the front teeth (upper) Produce a “whoosh” sound and exhale totally …

21-10-2021

Are you having difficulty sleeping? Are you a light sleeper who wakes up at the beep of your phone? Here are tips on how to fall asleep fast.

Everyone would agree that not all sleep is sound. Sometimes, waking up from the bed could be with intense headbangs – like a hangover feeling. However, nothing comes close to good sleep. It puts the body in a generally great condition and helps the brain function optimally. 

For some people, how to fall asleep fast is never up for debate. The story is different in many others as people could have difficulty staying or even falling asleep whenever they are to sleep, more especially at night. 

Like sicknesses could have effects on the body, bad sleeping habits can show negative effects on several areas of the brain and body. Poor sleep will affect memory, learning, emotions, mood, effectiveness during the day, and different biological functions. 

How to fall asleep fast

Whether individual struggles with a poor sleeping pattern or does not sleep at all, here are 8 basic ways how to fall asleep faster. 

A – Reduce the room temperature

The human body always regulates itself. The body is warmer during activities and cool during resting moments. A very warm room may make falling asleep difficult. To regulate a warm room, a temperature of 15.6-19.4°C will make the room cool enough for sound sleep. The truth is people have various preferences for room temperature because some get cold easily. 

Another way to regulate body temperature to sleep is by taking a warm shower before bedtime. Based on studies, the body cools down after the warm bath and sends signals to the brain that it is time for sleep. Bath at bedtime has proven to improve sleep quality and sleep efficiency (the time spent to be asleep as against lying awake in bed). 

Although researches are still ongoing, reducing body or room temperature has been the most promising solution on how to fall asleep really fast.

B – Have a sleeping schedule

There is a biological cycle in humans which is a regulatory system in itself. It is called the circadian rhythm. This rhythm is an internal clock that helps the body to be active during the day and sleepy at night. This rhythm is a body schedule such that the body knows when it ought to be alert or resting.

According to medical researchers, optimal sleeping hours for adults should be between 7 to 9 hours every night. The circadian rhythm can help the body to stick with these sleeping hours. However, there could be alterations that disrupt sleeping patterns. In turn, the alterations affect the body’s circadian rhythm. 

The following will assist the “body clock” for good sleep, improving your sleeping schedule;

  • Have time for bed – except it is an emergency situation, be in bed at that fixed time. 
  • Have time to wake up – an alarm has been an effective tool for this down the years. 
  • Wind up for 30 minutes before sleeping to relax the mind and body.

C – Emply the 4-7-8 method

Based on the effort of Dr. Andrew, the 4-7-8 method is a breathing pattern that calms and relaxes the body. It is similar to the famous yoga experience where one unwinds to relax the nervous system. It has been an effective approach that takes away stress and anxiety.

How does it (4-7-8 method) work for fall asleep fast;

  • Open the mouth slightly 
  • Put the tip of the tongue after the front teeth (upper) 
  • Produce a “whoosh” sound and exhale totally using the mouth 
  • Close the mouth completely 
  • Inhale using the nose and count to 4 with the head 
  • Hold the breath and count to 7 with the head 
  • Open the mouth again 
  • Exhale using the mouth and produce the “whoosh” sound. Count to 8 with the head. 
  • Repeat the process a minimum of three times.

As said earlier, this technique is from yoga and has been proven to help on how to fast asleep faster.

D – The power of meditation, yoga, and mindfulness

Stress is an enemy of good sleep. Meditation, yoga, and mindfulness are relaxing tools that improve sleep because they calm the mind. There are breathing patterns in yoga that free the body from accumulated tension and stress. 

Meditation helps to sleep faster by improving melatonin levels. Mindfulness reduces worry which makes one function effectively during the day and sleep well at bedtime. 

Be constant with meditation, yoga, and mindfulness to improve sleeping patterns. 

E – Do not take naps during the day

Taking nap during the day becomes an option for insomniacs who find it difficult to sleep at night. Even though short naps during the day improve wellbeing and alertness, they can affect regular nighttime sleep. 

Taking naps during the day can make one stay late into the night. For someone who has to get out of bed the next morning for work or school, there is a limited time to sleep due to daytime naps. 

It is possible that daytime naps do not affect some people while it has a tangible effect on others. Hence, it is a great idea to know which category one belongs to have higher quality nighttime. 

F – Use relaxing music

Music can be an effective solution to insomnia and generally, bad sleep habits. There are different types of music people listen to improve their sleep. 

Buddhist music, relaxing music, and sedative music are the commonest types of music for this purpose. 

Buddhist music helps to fall asleep quite fast. Relaxing and sedative music help to enjoy deep sleep and have a restful sleep. 

In situations where these types of music are not available, use noise cancellation devices to prevent interruption during sleep and have a nice time.  

G – Pay attention to the meals and know when to consume them

Food is necessary but they contribute to several biological functions in the body. 

Based on medical research, high-carb meals do not support a good night’s rest. Actually, the meals help to fall asleep faster but might not be restful. On the other hand, high-fat meals enhance restful and deeper sleep. 

If at all high carbs is on the dinner menu, eat it at least 4 hours before sleeping time. This process will make it digest before bedtime. 

H – Ensure maximum comfort while sleeping

Bad sleep could be due to basic factors like uncomfortable sleeping. A good mattress and pillow quality will go a long way as they prevent muscular discomfort and sleep disturbances. A weighted blanket will improve sleep and reduce body stress. 

Before going to bed, fabric clothes or pajamas are comfortable clothing for bed because they help with optimum temperature all through the night. 

Other options one can consider on how to fall asleep fast are;

  1. Consume sleep supplements
  2. Explore aromatherapy 
  3. Reduce caffeine and take bedtime teas instead 
  4. Know the sleep position that works best 
  5. Keep electronics off at sleeping hours 
  6. Carry out daily exercises.

Conclusion

Good sleep is as important as good food. Other than ineffectiveness during the day, bad sleeping habits could pose serious health problems. However, this guide on how to fall asleep fast will go a long way to achieving good health. 

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For some people, fixing their schedule and falling asleep on time is just impossible. Talking to your doctor can offer up some other options that are catered to you. …

How to fall asleep fast in 5 minutes?

How to fall asleep fast in 5 minutes?  Everyone has a bad night or two, but some people have more trouble fixing their sleep schedules than others. If you find yourself up past midnight too often, or just want to fall asleep in under 2 hours for once, these tips can help you on your way to a healthier and more consistent sleep for when you want to sleep.

1 - Blue Light

Every website tells you about the dangers of blue light, but what does it really do? Is it so much worse than red light? The answer is in our evolution.  

Our brains are hardwired to be awake in the daytime when it is bright, and the sky is blue and asleep at night when it is dark. Exposing yourself to a lot of blue light will tell your brain that it’s still bright and blue out there, delaying the production of all those lovely sleep chemicals. 

Doing things as simple as downloading a blue light filter to activate at night, and turning down the brightness of your devices, will help your brain shift into sleep mode earlier.

2 - Noise

There are some conflicting opinions about how noisy it should be when you’re falling asleep. For about 30% of people, white noise (this can be anything from ambient sounds outside, a spouse snoring, or a fan on) helps them fall asleep, as the droning helps their minds relax. 

However, having the sound continue through the night can cause problems for more sensitive people, making their sleep less restful. This isn’t true for everyone, but it’s good to consider if you’re having trouble.

3 - Temperature

One of the main reasons people get used to sleeping with the fan on, or the window open, is because they otherwise get too hot at night. Temperature can be the most awkward thing to control if you’re trying to relax, but there are some things you can do. 

Simple things like opening the window or kicking off the blankets can help most people; others do things like use a cool cloth on their head to relax and regulate. The use of pillows and mattresses with cooling technology can help those who produce a lot of heat during the night from baking themselves.

4 - Routine

It’s often understated, but a steady routine is what makes things happen. Having a 10-minute routine leading up to bedtime, every night, which ends in trying to sleep will prepare your brain for rest so it’s ready when you are. Doing things that disrupt the routine, like checking your phone, talking to people, or just listening to music can make the routine pointless if it doesn’t lead to sleep. The point is to create a pavlovian response in your brain to sleep. If you do the same thing every time it’s time to sleep, doing that thing will cause you to fall asleep. 

5 - Sleep aids

Not everyone can manage their sleep without help, but there’s plenty of options that don’t involve medication. Things like weighted blankets can offer a relaxing and grounding kind of stimulus that helps you relax. Sometimes it’s as simple as sleeping with an eye mask or earplugs to block out external things that might be keeping you up. There’s even a myriad of helpful apps that can help you track and manage your sleep, you can read about our favourites here.

6 - Medication

For some people, fixing their schedule and falling asleep on time is just impossible. Talking to your doctor can offer up some other options that are catered to you. Melatonin is well known and over the counter, since melatonin is just the chemical your brain produces to fall asleep, it’s safe. However, it doesn’t work that well for everyone.

You can ask your doctor about prescription sleep aids, which can help you get back on track. Certain over the counter antihistamines can also serve as sleep aids, such as Benadryl, but you shouldn’t use it frequently unless your doctor recommends it. 

Everyone has Gotta Sleep, but everyone's needs are different. See what works best for you and get the rest for you.

How to Fall Asleep Fast in 10, 60, or 120 Seconds

05-10-2018 · How to fall asleep in 120 seconds Tell yourself to stay awake. Also called paradoxical intention, telling yourself to stay awake may be a good way to fall... Visualize a calm place. If counting activates your mind too much, try engaging your imagination. Some say that... Acupressure for sleep. ...

05-10-2018
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The fastest way to sleep?

Spending more time trying to fall asleep rather than actually sleeping? You’re not alone.

Just the act of trying too hard can cause (or continue) a cycle of anxious, nerve-wracking energy that keeps our minds awake.

And if your mind can’t sleep, it’s really difficult for your body to follow. But there are scientific tricks you can try to flip the switch and guide your body into a safe shutdown mode.

We cover some science-based tricks to help you fall asleep faster.

It usually takes a magic spell to fall asleep this quickly and on cue, but just like spells, with practice you can eventually get to the sweet 10-second spot.

Note: The method below takes a full 120 seconds to finish, but the last 10 seconds is said to be truly all it takes to finally snooze.

The military method

The popular military method, which was first reported by Sharon Ackerman, comes from a book titled “Relax and Win: Championship Performance.”

According to Ackerman, the United States Navy Pre-Flight School created a routine to help pilots fall asleep in 2 minutes or less. It took pilots about 6 weeks of practice, but it worked — even after drinking coffee and with gunfire noises in the background.

This practice is said to even work for people who need to sleep sitting up!

If this doesn’t work for you, you may need to work on the foundations of the military method: breathing and muscle relaxation, which have some scientific evidence that they work. Also, some conditions such as ADHD or anxiety may interfere with this method’s effectiveness.

Keep reading to learn about the techniques this military method is based on and how to practice them effectively.

These two methods, which focus on your breathe or muscles, help you take your mind off topic and back to bed.

If you’re a beginner trying these hacks out, these methods may take up to 2 minutes to work.

4-7-8 breathing method

Mixing together the powers of meditation and visualization, this breathing method becomes more effective with practice. If you have a respiratory condition, such as asthma or COPD, consider checking with your doctor before beginning, as this could aggravate your symptoms.

To prepare, place the tip of your tongue against the roof of your mouth, behind your two front teeth. Keep your tongue there the whole time and purse your lips if you need to.

Progressive muscle relaxation (PMR)

Progressive muscle relaxation, also known as deep muscle relaxation, helps you unwind.

The premise is to tense — but not strain — your muscles and relax to release the tension. This movement promotes tranquility throughout your body. It’s a trick recommended to help with insomnia.

Before you start, try practicing the 4-7-8 method while imagining the tension leaving your body as you exhale.

As you do this, focus on how relaxed and heavy your body feels when it’s relaxed and in a comfortable state.

If the previous methods still didn’t work, there might be an underlying blockage you need to get out. Try these techniques!

Tell yourself to stay awake

Also called paradoxical intention, telling yourself to stay awake may be a good way to fall asleep faster.

For people — especially those with insomnia — trying to sleep can increase performance anxiety.

Research has found that people who practiced paradoxical intention fell asleep faster than those who didn’t. If you often find yourself stressed out about trying to sleep, this method may be more effective than traditional, intentional breathing practices.

Visualize a calm place

If counting activates your mind too much, try engaging your imagination.

Some say that visualizing something can make it real, and it’s possible this works with sleep, too.

In a 2002 study from the University of Oxford, researchers found that people who engaged in “imagery distraction” fell asleep faster than those who had general distraction or no instructions.

Acupressure for sleep

There’s not enough research to confidently determine if acupressure truly works. However, the research that’s available is promising.

One method is to target areas you know and feel are particularly tense, such as the upper part of your nose bridge or your temples.

However, there are also specific points in acupressure that are reported to help with insomnia. Here are three you can do without sitting up:

1. Spirit gate

2. Inner frontier gate

3. Wind pool

If you’ve tried these methods and are still finding yourself unable to fall asleep in 2 minutes or less, see if there are other tips you can take to make your bedroom a more sleep-friendly place.

If you find the atmosphere in your room to be damaging to your sleep, there are tools you can use to block out the noise. Literally.

Try investing in blackout curtains, white noise machines (or listening to music with an auto-stop timer), and ear plugs, all of which you can buy online.

On the other hand, sleep hygiene, or clean sleep, is real and effective.

Before you truly take on the military method or 4-7-8 breathing, see what you can optimize to your bedroom for soundless slumber.

Christal Yuen is an editor at Healthline who writes and edits content revolving around sex, beauty, health, and wellness. She’s constantly looking for ways to help readers forge their own health journey. You can find her on Twitter.

How to Fall Asleep Fast: 20 Tips to Beat Insomnia

10-03-2021 · How to Fall Asleep Fast: 20 Tips to Beat Insomnia 1. Try The Military Method. The military method is a technique that focuses on muscle relaxation, breathing, and mental... 2. Use The 4-7-8 Method. The 4-7-8 method is based on Pranayama, a traditional …

10-03-2021

Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder, with up to 30% of adults reporting short-term sleep issues. But if you’ve been up at night wondering how to fall asleep fast, it might be affecting you even more than you realize. 

Failing to fall asleep isn’t only frustrating — the anxiety from not being able to sleep can actually make it even harder to fall asleep in the future. So how can you stop this domino effect to successfully catch some zzz’s?

1. Try The Military Method

The military method is a technique that focuses on muscle relaxation, breathing, and mental visualization. Here’s how to fall asleep fast with the military method. 

  1. Sit or lay down on your bed, slowly relaxing the muscles in your body.
  2. Beginning with your face, tense your muscles then allow them to loosen naturally. Begin to take deep, calming breaths. 
  3. Repeat this process until your entire body feels completely at ease. 
  4. Push all thoughts from your head for 10 seconds. When your brain feels clear, picture one of the following scenarios:
    1. Peacefully lying in a canoe on a calm lake
    2. Gently rocking back and forth in a completely dark room
  5. If the above is unsuccessful, mentally repeat “don’t think, don’t think, don’t think” for at least 10 seconds, and try again. 

2. Use The 4-7-8 Method

The 4-7-8 method is based on Pranayama, a traditional yoga technique. This method can help ease anxiety and lull you into a state of calm. In the 4-7-8 technique, you focus on counting to distract yourself from feelings of anxiety. Here’s how to sleep faster with the 4-7-8 method.

  1. While laying down in bed, allow your tongue to relax behind your front teeth, resting on the roof of your mouth. 
  2. Slowly exhale all of your breath through your mouth, completely emptying your lungs. 
  3. Breath in through your nose for 4 seconds, hold your breath for 7 seconds, then exhale for 8 seconds.
  4. Repeat this process at least four times. 

3. Try to Stay Awake

An unexpected strategy for trying to fall asleep fast is actually to try to stay awake. While it may sound counterintuitive, trying to stay awake can help you lessen the anxiety around trying to fall asleep.

Since falling asleep is an involuntary process, taking your mind off of the task at hand can give your brain the break it needs for you to stop counting sheep. 

4. Turn Down Your Tech

Illustration of phone on top of pillows

With the prevalence of modern technology, surfing the internet before bed is more of a given than a question. While it can be tough to turn off your tech, looking at your screen before bed can negatively impact your quality of sleep. Many devices emit a blue light that simulates sunlight — and while this is helpful before your morning coffee, it can do more harm than good when trying to hit the hay. 

If you’re not able to completely part with your devices for an hour before bed, consider turning down your tech instead. Try listening to music, a calming podcast, or an audiobook for screen-free entertainment while you get ready for bed. 

5. Don’t Worry If You Don’t Fall Asleep Instantly

Is it possible to fall asleep in five minutes? Many people make the mistake of trying to fall asleep almost instantly, but going from wide awake to snoozing isn’t always like flipping off a switch. 

Instead, start to wind down around an hour before bedtime, slowly setting up a sleep-friendly environment in your bedroom by dimming your lights and relaxing your body. 

6. Try Autogenic Training

Autogenic training is a relaxation method created by Johannes Heinrich Schultz, a German psychiatrist. Based on the principles of hypnosis, autogenic training uses a series of statements to create a calming effect in your nervous system. Here’s how to fall asleep fast with autogenic training methods.

  1. Lay down and bring focus to your breath, saying to yourself, “I am completely calm.”
  2. Bring your focus to your arms and repeat to yourself, “My arms are very heavy,” then, “I am completely calm,” at least six times. 
  3. Move your focus to your legs and repeat to yourself, “My legs are very heavy,” then, “I am completely calm,” at least six times. 
  4. Move around to different parts of your body, such as your abdomen, forehead, and heart, repeating the above phrases at least six times. 
  5. Once you feel relaxed, begin to shift your attention to your entire body, where you should then feel relaxed and warm.
  6. Repeat the above steps until you’re ready, at which point you can open your eyes (if you haven’t yet fallen asleep) and enjoy the state of calm. 

7. Do a Body Scan

While a body scan might sound a bit medical-grade, it’s actually an easy relaxation technique you can do before bed to promote better sleep. A body scan is a check-in with yourself and your body that you can do by bringing awareness and intention to each part of your body. 

Similar to the military method, a body scan focuses on one section of the body at a time until you feel completely relaxed. However, with a body scan, you move at a very slow rate throughout your body, taking 10 to 20 minutes to reach the tips of your feet.

  1. Lay down in a relaxed and comfortable position.
  2. Beginning with your head, focus on one section of your body until it feels completely relaxed.
  3. Move down to your shoulders, allowing them to relax before progressing down the right side of your body. 
  4. Once your right side feels relaxed, begin focusing on the left side of your body. 
  5. After 10 to 20 minutes, check in with your body to see if you feel completely relaxed. 

8. Take A Warm Bath or Shower

Illustration of man taking a bath with soap and plants in the foreground

A warm soak has long since been known as a remedy after a long day. But did you know that taking a warm bath or shower is shown to help you fall asleep 36% faster? 

Next time you think you might be up counting sheep, step into the tub for a nice and relaxing soak. Taking time for a hot bath or shower can also improve your quality of sleep — even during warm weather. 

9. Do Progressive Muscle Relaxation

Similar to body scanning, progressive muscle relaxation involves focusing on different areas of your body to put yourself in a relaxed state. However, with progressive muscle relaxation, you tense different muscle groups a few times before allowing them to relax. 

  1. Raise your eyebrows to tighten your forehead muscles, then allow them to relax, focusing on the release of tension from the temples.
  2. Squeeze your eyes shut, then allow them to relax, focusing on how your eyelids fall over your eyes. 
  3. Smile to feel tension in your cheeks and jaw, then allow them to relax, focusing on how each muscle interacts within your face.
  4. Repeat this process through the rest of your body, moving through muscle groups in the shoulders, arms, abdomen, and legs, before finishing at your feet. 
  5. Lay in this relaxed position until you doze off to sleep. 

10. Meditate Before Bed

Research has shown that meditation can actually be a powerful way to overcome insomnia. By taking time before bed to meditate, you can clear your mind of the stresses of the day and focus only on the present moment. Use the below method to meditate before you go to bed.

  1. Sit or lie down in a comfortable position. 
  2. Close your eyes, slow your breathing, and focus on deeply inhaling and exhaling. 
  3. Clear your mind of thoughts. If you feel thoughts intruding, push them away by refocusing your breathing.
  4. Start with as little as five minutes of meditation, working your way up to longer periods as it feels comfortable. 

11. Practice Imagery

Illustration of a lake with rolling hills

Imagery is a mental exercise you can do to calm your senses before bed. To practice imagery, picture a peaceful and happy image from your past and try to “paint” the picture in your mind, down to the very smallest details.

This mental exercise will engage your brain and focus your attention on your chosen image, promoting relaxation and putting you in a state of calm. 

12. Avoid Caffeine Up to Six Hours Prior

While caffeine may be the MVP for getting you out of bed, it’s also a major culprit in keeping you from falling asleep. So how long before bedtime should you be avoiding your daily cup of joe? 

Research has shown that caffeine can impact your quality of sleep up to six hours before bedtime — so if you typically sleep at around 10 pm,  you should probably be finishing up your last cup before 4 pm. 

To get your drink fix before bed, opt for a decaffeinated drink like calming chamomile or lavender tea to satisfy your cravings without sacrificing your sleep. 

13. Create a Bedtime Routine

Creating a consistent bedtime routine can help you set your internal body clock so you know when to wind down for the night. Your bedtime routine can be as simple as playing a pre-bedtime playlist or taking a nightly bath — what matters is that your routine works for you.

Your bedtime routine should be catered to your self-care preferences. There’s no one specific bedtime routine that works for everyone, but if you stick to a simple nightly ritual, your body will thank you for it. 

14. Keep the Thermostat Low

Do you ever feel like you spend your whole night trying to flip to the cold side of the pillow? While you might think sleeping in a warm environment would keep you restful and cozy, it’s actually better to sleep in a cool room. 

The ideal temperature for sleep is between 60 and 67 degrees Fahrenheit. While it might feel too cold for comfort during the day, your internal temperature drops at night as an internal signal that it’s time to sleep, meaning a cooler room provides the right situation for better quality sleep. 

15. Dim the Lights With a Glow Light

Light is an important signal that tells your body what “mode” to be in. While bright lights like blue light are great for keeping you alert, ambient yellow-toned light can help signal to your body that it’s time to turn in.

Using a dimming light, like a glow light, can help your body gradually relax into a sleep-ready state. For the best results, start dimming your lights slowly after dinner, until you’re ready for bed in your dark, cozy haven. 

16. Do Yoga Before Bed

Illustration of a woman in childs pose

If you end the day feeling restless, a bit of calming yoga can be the reset your body needs to wind down before bed. Studies have shown that yoga before bed has helped people with insomnia improve their sleep quality by helping them fall asleep faster and sleep for longer. 

Yoga is a great way to relax your mind and your body by encouraging deep breathing and muscle relaxation. Next time you’re trying to fall asleep, consider spending a few minutes in child’s pose or happy baby first to get yourself ready to catch some zzz’s. 

17. Put Socks On

If you’re struggling to fall asleep and don’t know why, you might be getting cold feet — literally. Research has shown that when your feet are cold, your blood vessels constrict, causing less blood to circulate and sending signals to your brain to stay awake. 

Putting on a pair of socks before bed can help the blood vessels in your feet dilate, sending signals to your brain that it’s time for some sweet dreams. 

18. Take a Walk

Can’t stay still at night? Try taking a walk (kind of). While it may sound counterintuitive, getting up at night and moving to another area of your home for a few minutes can reset your brain so you’re not lying in bed restlessly waiting for respite. 

If you’re still struggling to fall asleep after 20 minutes, it might be time to do a quick reset. Just try to keep your nighttime stroll to around five to 10 minutes, making sure not to do anything jarring like turning on a bright light or causing a loud sound. 

19. Use a Weighted Blanket

Weighted blankets are heavy blankets used as a form of pressure therapy to create a calming effect and help stimulate the release of serotonin in your brain. The ideal weighted blanket is around 10% of your body weight, since the blanket applies enough pressure that you’re calm and relaxed without feeling too restricted. 

Whether you use a weighted blanket during your pre-bedtime ritual or throughout the night, your body will surely thank you for it.

20. Turn off the Clock

When you’re struggling to sleep at night, looking at your clock can further compound your sleep anxiety. Try turning off your clock, or turning it around so you can’t see the time at night. 

Additionally, make sure your phone is placed face down if you keep it by your bed. That way, you won’t be as tempted to check the time — or go on a late night web-surfing binge. 

Set Yourself Up For Success

A good night’s sleep does wonders for you, both mentally and physically. But if you’re having trouble falling asleep, the anxiety that triggers can actually make it even harder to catch some zzz’s.

Whether you do progressive muscle relaxation or start dimming the lights after dinner, set yourself up for a great night’s sleep with a soft and supportive mattress for the sleep of your dreams. 

Sleeping Tips to Help You Fall Asleep Fast

With so many individuals searching for the secret of how to fall asleep, we felt it beneficial to review a few key sleeping tips to help you fall asleep quickly. Sleeping Tips to Help You Fall Asleep Fast. Have a ritual – go to bed at the same time. Wake up at the same time.

*I recommend proofreading your website.

How to Fall Asleep Fast

Sure, there are things you can do to fall asleep quickly without requiring medication. Sometimes the easiest way to fall asleep is by making sure your brain only thinks the bed is for sleeping. Don’t read, watch television, or use a smartphone or tablet while in bed. These stimulating activities might actually train your brain to think that you get into bed and stay awake instead of sleeping. If you get into bed …

Tips for Falling Asleep Fast

16-12-2021 · Techniques for falling asleep faster usually focus on reducing bedtime stress and inducing a calmer state known as the relaxation response 9. Relaxation techniques typically include elements of deep breathing and focused attention 10.

16-12-2021

If you have ever struggled with insomnia, you may wonder how to fall asleep faster. While your specific characteristics and needs can influence your sleep patterns, practicing a few proven methods may help you more quickly achieve restful sleep.

Relaxation is key to falling asleep fast. Becoming relaxed prepares your body and mind to drift off to sleep. We’ll discuss several activities that can help promote sleep, including meditation, breathing exercises, and guided imagery.

How Long Should It Take to Fall Asleep?

Sleep latency, or sleep onset latency, refers to the amount of time it takes to fall asleep. A healthy sleep latency period typically ranges from 10 to 20 minutes. This period does not include pre-sleep bedtime habits such as showering, brushing your teeth, or meditating, but rather the time spent trying to sleep once you are in bed.

The National Sleep Foundation states that a sleep onset latency of 15 minutes or less is healthy, a sleep latency between 16 and 30 minutes is relatively normal, but a sleep latency of longer than 45 minutes is indicative of poor sleep quality. Excessively long or short periods of sleep latency may indicate issues with sleep health.

The Time it Takes to Fall Asleep and Overall Sleep Health

Taking less than 10 minutes to fall asleep may indicate that you are sleep-deprived. On the other hand, taking too long to fall asleep is considered a symptom of insomnia and may be a marker of unhealthy sleep.

Sleep latency also affects sleep efficiency, a marker of sleep quality that describes the amount of time spent sleeping vs. laying in bed. By definition, individuals who experience longer sleep latency periods have less efficient sleep.

A common trait among many people with insomnia is difficulty shutting off worries when trying to sleep. At bedtime, a good sleeper may quickly transition from regular wakeful thinking to a calmer state that is more imagery-oriented. By contrast, someone with insomnia may lay awake planning or problem-solving, which prevents them from fully relaxing. Similarly, people who have trouble falling asleep often show heightened physical signs of stress, such as tense muscles, a higher temperature, and a quicker heartbeat.
 

Tips for Falling Asleep Fast

Techniques for falling asleep faster usually focus on reducing bedtime stress and inducing a calmer state known as the relaxation response. Relaxation techniques typically include elements of deep breathing and focused attention. Although more research is needed, some studies suggest these techniques may help relieve pain, stress, anxiety, and other conditions that can interfere with sleep.

As part of your bedtime routine, set aside time for relaxing techniques that work for you and your sleep habits. Remember to start your bedtime routine early enough so that you leave time to obtain the recommended amount of sleep for your age group.

The Military Method

Members of the military often have inconsistent schedules and less-than-optimal sleeping conditions, which can affect their sleep patterns. The military method is a technique developed to help soldiers achieve sleep in two minutes. This process includes the following steps:

  • Assume a comfortable position and relax each part of your face, such as your eyelids, jaw, lips, and brow.
  • Allow your arms to rest at your sides, dropping your shoulders first.
  • Begin taking deep breaths to relax your chest.
  • Start relaxing your lower half, working your way from your hips down through each part of your leg to your feet.
  • Visualize a peaceful setting to set your mind at ease, such as beautiful countryside, a quiet lake, or a cozy room in your home. If you experience any intrusive thoughts, recognize them and try to move beyond these images. Visualization might be a bit difficult — if you struggle to conjure relaxing images, repeat a simple phrase to yourself, like “don’t think.”

Peaceful Music

A noisy setting can make it difficult to quickly achieve restful sleep. In addition to reducing any unnecessary or bothersome sounds, you may find that listening to soothing music helps you relax and block out external noises. Consider preparing a playlist that aligns with an ideal 10 to 20 minute sleep latency window and listen each night to create a routine for yourself. If you find music too distracting, some people also tout the benefits of white noise for sleep.

Progressive Muscle Relaxation

Progressive muscle relaxation uses breathing techniques combined with muscle contraction and release to alleviate bodily stress. By gradually working through all the major muscle groups, progressive muscle relaxation aims to promote relaxation.This process includes the following steps:

  • Lie in bed, close your eyes, and begin slowly inhaling and exhaling deep breaths.
  • Tense your face muscles for 10 seconds. Release the tension and take several deep breaths.
  • Next, tense your shoulder muscles for 10 seconds before releasing. Inhale and exhale deeply.
  • Repeat this step for other muscle groups throughout your body, starting with your shoulders and continuing through to your feet. Omit any areas where you feel pain.

Guided Imagery

Recalling a serene memory or imagining a peaceful setting can help reduce the stressors of the day to prepare your mind and body for sleep. Take slow, deep breaths and focus on sensory details, including sights, sounds, and smells to immerse yourself in an imagined space. You may find it helpful to use a pre-recorded soundtrack to direct your thoughts. Guided imagery soundtracks are widely available online.

Meditation

Practicing meditation techniques for achieving restful sleep may help you drift off faster. Mindfulness meditation in particular has shown promising results for improving sleep.

The core tenets of mindfulness meditation include bringing about relaxation by focusing on the present and letting go of judgment. When practiced at bedtime, mindfulness may help reduce rumination and make it easier to let go of negative emotions in preparation for sleep.

A 2014 study found that mindfulness meditation helped calm sleep-related anxiety and reduce time awake in bed for people with chronic insomnia. When initially beginning meditation methods, you may find it takes longer to reach a state of relaxation. As you become more familiar with the process, you can begin to relax more quickly and fall asleep. Talk to your doctor before starting meditation if you have a history of trauma, or if you find that meditation brings up painful or difficult thoughts.

Along with these relaxation techniques, methods to improve sleep onset latency may include getting regular exercise, taking a warm bath or shower before bedtime, essential oil aromatherapy, or writing down thoughts and worries.

Tips for Better Sleep

Achieving better sleep may require making changes to your overall lifestyle and sleep  routine, a concept known as sleep hygiene. Examples of good sleep hygiene habits include:

  • Sticking to a consistent sleep and wake schedule.
  • Reducing caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol intake.
  • Avoiding electronic devices in the leadup to bedtime.
  • Ensuring that you have a quiet, dark, and comfortably cool sleep environment free of distractions.
  • Keeping naps to 30 minutes or less (and not too close to bedtime).
  • Using the bedroom for sleep and sex only.
  • Going to another room if you cannot sleep after 20 minutes, and only returning to bed once you feel sleepy.
  • Choose appropriate bedtime snacks.

If you still have trouble falling asleep after making these changes, consider consulting a healthcare professional. You might have a sleep disorder or another underlying condition that is interfering with your sleep. Your doctor can help identify the issue and work with you to develop a treatment plan.

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  • Molen, Y. F., Carvalho, L. B., Prado, L. B., & Prado, G. F. (2014). Insomnia: Psychological and neurobiological aspects and non-pharmacological treatments. Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria, 72(1), 63–71.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24637973/
  • National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. (2021, June). Relaxation techniques: What you need to know. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. Retrieved November 9, 2021, fromhttps://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/relaxation-techniques-what-you-need-to-know
  • National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. (2021, November). 5 things to know about relaxation techniques for stress. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. Retrieved November 9, 2021, from https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/tips/things-to-know-about-relaxation-techniques-for-stress
  • Merck Manuals. Sleep hygiene. Merck Manual Professional Version. Retrieved November 9, 2021, from https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/multimedia/table/v41413035
  • Good, C. H., Brager, A. J., Capaldi, V. F., & Mysliwiec, V. (2020). Sleep in the United States military. Neuropsychopharmacology: Official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, 45(1), 176–191. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31185484/
  • Maloney, E. (2019, January 8). I stopped sleeping. Then I tried a method that’s supposed to work in two minutes or less. The Washington Post. Retrieved November 9, 2021, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/2019/01/08/i-stopped-sleeping-then-i-tried-method-thats-supposed-work-two-minutes-or-less/
  • Bevan, R., Grantham-Hill, S., Bowen, R., Clayton, E., Grice, H., Venditti, H. C., Stickland, A., & Hill, C. M. (2019). Sleep quality and noise: Comparisons between hospital and home settings. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 104(2), 147–151. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30018067/
  • Dickson, G. T., & Schubert, E. (2019). How does music aid sleep? Literature review. Sleep Medicine, 63, 142–150.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31655374/
  • Riedy, S. M., Smith, M. G., Rocha, S., & Basner, M. (2021). Noise as a sleep aid: A systematic review. Sleep Medicine Reviews, 55, 101385. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33007706/
  • Combertaldi, S. L., Ort, A., Cordi, M., Fahr, A., & Rasch, B. (2021). Pre-sleep social media use does not strongly disturb sleep: A sleep laboratory study in healthy young participants. Sleep Medicine, 87, 191–202.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34627122/
  • Ong, J. C., Manber, R., Segal, Z., Xia, Y., Shapiro, S., & Wyatt, J. K. (2014). A randomized controlled trial of mindfulness meditation for chronic insomnia. Sleep, 37(9), 1553–1563.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25142566/
  • Rusch, H. L., Rosario, M., Levison, L. M., Olivera, A., Livingston, W. S., Wu, T., & Gill, J. M. (2019). The effect of mindfulness meditation on sleep quality: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1445(1), 5–16.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30575050/
  • Kredlow, M. A., Capozzoli, M. C., Hearon, B. A., Calkins, A. W., & Otto, M. W. (2015). The effects of physical activity on sleep: A meta-analytic review. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 38(3), 427–449.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25596964/
  • Haghayegh, S., Khoshnevis, S., Smolensky, M. H., Diller, K. R., & Castriotta, R. J. (2019). Before-bedtime passive body heating by warm shower or bath to improve sleep: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Sleep Medicine Reviews, 46, 124–135. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31102877/
  • Dos Reis Lucena, L., Dos Santos-Junior, J. G., Tufik, S., & Hachul, H. (2021). Lavender essential oil on postmenopausal women with insomnia: Double-blind randomized trial. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 59, 102726.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33905827/
  • Scullin, M. K., Krueger, M. L., Ballard, H. K., Pruett, N., & Bliwise, D. L. (2018). The effects of bedtime writing on difficulty falling asleep: A polysomnographic study comparing to-do lists and completed activity lists. Journal of Experimental Psychology. General, 147(1), 139–146.https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29058942/
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20 Best Ways to Fall Asleep Fast 1. Switch off all electronic devices.. Switch off all electronic devices when going to sleep. Switching them off will... 2. Concentrate on staying awake.. Concentrate on staying awake to fall asleep fast. When …

20 Simple Ways to Fall Asleep Fast: Exercise, Supplements ...

10-08-2020 · Lastly, if relaxing music isn’t available, blocking all noise could also help you fall asleep faster and promote uninterrupted sleep (37, 38). 10. Exercise during the day

10-08-2020

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Good sleep is incredibly important.

It helps you feel good and makes your body and brain function properly.

Some people have no problem falling asleep. However, many others have severe difficulty falling and staying asleep through the night.

Poor sleep can have negative effects on many parts of your body and brain, including learning, memory, mood, emotions, and various biological functions (1).

Here are 20 simple ways to fall asleep as fast as possible.

Your body temperature changes as you fall asleep. Your body cools down when you lie down and warms up when you get up (2, 3).

If your room is too warm, you might have a hard time falling asleep. Setting your thermostat to a cool temperature between 60–67°F (15.6–19.4°C) could help (4).

Individual preferences will vary, so find the temperature that works best for you.

Taking a warm bath or shower could also help speed up the body’s temperature changes. As your body cools down afterward, this can send a signal to your brain to go to sleep (5).

One literature review found that taking a hot bath or shower before bed could improve certain sleep parameters, such as sleep efficiency and sleep quality.

Sleep efficiency refers to the amount of time you spend asleep in bed as opposed to lying awake.

People who took baths or showers measuring between 104°F–108.5°F (40.0°C–42.5°C) 1 to 2 hours before bedtime experienced positive results.

They reported improvements in their sleep even if their baths or showers lasted for as little as 10 minutes.

More research is needed, but these findings are promising (6).

The “4-7-8” method that Dr. Andrew Weil developed is a simple but powerful breathing method that promotes calmness and relaxation. It might also help you unwind before bed (7).

It’s based on breath control techniques learned from yoga, and it consists of a breathing pattern that relaxes the nervous system. It can be practiced any time you feel anxious or stressed.

Here are the steps:

  1. First, place the tip of your tongue behind your upper front teeth.
  2. Exhale completely through your mouth and make a “whoosh” sound.
  3. Close your mouth, and inhale through your nose while mentally counting to 4.
  4. Hold your breath, and mentally count to 7.
  5. Open your mouth and exhale completely, making a “whoosh” sound and mentally counting to 8.
  6. Repeat this cycle at least three more times.

This technique can relax you and help you fall asleep quickly.

Many people find that setting a sleep schedule helps them fall asleep easier.

Your body has its own regulatory system called the circadian rhythm. This internal clock cues your body to feel alert during the day but sleepy at night (1).

Waking up and going to bed at the same times each day can help your internal clock keep a regular schedule.

Once your body adjusts to this schedule, it’ll be easier to fall asleep and wake up around the same time every day (8).

It’s also important to get 7 to 9 hours of sleep each night. This has been shown to be the optimal sleep duration for adults (1).

Lastly, give yourself 30–45 minutes to wind down in the evening before getting in bed. This allows your body and mind to relax and prepare for sleep (9).

Light can influence your body’s internal clock, which regulates sleep and wakefulness.

Irregular light exposure can lead to the disruption of circadian rhythms, making it harder to fall asleep and stay awake (10).

During the day, exposing your body to bright light tells it to stay alert. Both natural daylight and artificial light, such as the kind emitted from an e-reader, have this effect on your alertness (11, 12).

At night, darkness promotes feelings of sleepiness. In fact, research shows that darkness boosts the production of melatonin, an essential hormone for sleep. In fact, the body secretes very little melatonin during the day (13, 14).

Get out and expose your body to sunlight or artificial bright light throughout the day. If possible, use blackout curtains to make your room dark at night.

Shop for blackout curtains online.

When people are stressed, they tend to have difficulty falling asleep (15).

Yoga, meditation, and mindfulness are tools to calm the mind and relax the body. Moreover, they’ve all been shown to improve sleep (15, 16, 17, 18, 19).

Yoga encourages the practice of breathing patterns and body movements that release stress and tension accumulated in your body.

Research shows that yoga can have a positive effect on sleep parameters such as sleep quality, sleep efficiency, and sleep duration (15, 16).

Meditation can enhance melatonin levels and assist the brain in achieving a specific state where sleep is easily achieved (17).

Lastly, mindfulness may help you maintain focus on the present, worry less while falling asleep, and even function better during the day (18, 19).

Practicing one or all of these techniques can help you get a good night’s rest and wake up reenergized.

It’s normal to wake up in the middle of the night. However, the inability to fall back asleep can ruin a good night’s rest (20).

People who wake up in the middle of the night often tend to watch the clock and obsess about the fact that they can’t fall back asleep.

Clock-watching is common among people with insomnia. This behavior may cause anxiety about sleeplessness (21).

To make matters worse, waking on a regular basis without falling back asleep may cause your body to develop a routine. As a result, you might find yourself waking up in the middle of the night every night.

If possible, it’s best to remove the clock from your room. If you need an alarm in the room, you can turn your clock and avoid watching it when you wake up in the middle of the night.

Due to poor sleep at night, people with insomnia tend to be sleepy during the day, which often leads to daytime napping.

While naps of short duration have been linked to improvements in alertness and well-being, there are mixed opinions about the effects of napping on nighttime sleep.

Some studies have shown that regular naps that are long (at least 2 hours), and late may lead to poor nighttime sleep quality and even sleep deprivation (22, 23).

In a study of 440 college students, the poorest nighttime sleep quality was observed in those who reported taking three or more naps per week, those who napped for more than 2 hours, and those who napped late (between 6 p.m. and 9 p.m) (22).

A 1996 study found that older adults who napped frequently had lower quality nighttime sleep, more depressive symptoms, and more limited physical activity. They were also more likely to be overweight than those who rarely took a nap (23).

A recent study of high-schoolers concluded that daytime napping led to shorter sleep duration and lower sleep efficiency (24).

Other studies have revealed that naps don’t affect nighttime sleep (25, 26).

To find out if naps are affecting your sleep, try either eliminating naps altogether or limiting yourself to a short nap (30 minutes or less) early in the day.

It seems that the food you eat before bed may affect your sleep. For example, research has shown that high-carb meals may be detrimental to a good night’s rest.

A review of studies concluded that even though a high-carb diet can get you to fall asleep faster, it won’t be restful sleep. Instead, high-fat meals could promote a deeper and more restful sleep (27, 28).

In fact, several older and newer studies agree that a high-carb/low-fat diet significantly decreased the quality of sleep compared to a low-carb/high-fat diet.

This held true in situations where the high-carb/low-fat diets and the low-carb/high-fat diets contained the same amount of calories (29, 30, 31).

If you still want to eat a high-carb meal for dinner, you should eat it at least 4 hours before bed so you have enough time to digest it (28).

Music can significantly improve quality of sleep. It can even be used to improve chronic sleep disorders, such as insomnia (32, 33).

A study of 24 young adults demonstrated that sedative music promoted deeper sleep (34).

Listening to Buddhist music may be another great tool for better sleep, as it can reduce the amount of time it takes you to fall asleep. This parameter is known as sleep onset.

Buddhist music is created from different Buddhist chants and is used for meditation (35).

Another 50-person study revealed that those who were exposed to soothing music for 45 minutes at bedtime had a more restful and deeper sleep compared to those who didn’t listen to music (36).

Lastly, if relaxing music isn’t available, blocking all noise could also help you fall asleep faster and promote uninterrupted sleep (37, 38).

Physical activity is often considered beneficial to healthy sleep.

Exercise can increase the duration and quality of sleep by boosting the production of serotonin in the brain and decreasing levels of cortisol, the stress hormone (39).

However, it’s important to maintain a moderate-intensity exercise routine and not overdo it. Excessive training has been linked to poor sleep (40).

The time of the day when you exercise is also critical. To promote better quality sleep, working out early in the morning appears to be better than working out later in the day (41, 42).

Therefore, moderate to vigorous exercise in the morning could significantly improve the quality of your sleep and how much sleep you get.

Get moving with activities like:

  • running
  • hiking
  • cycling
  • tennis

A comfortable mattress and bedding can have a remarkable effect on the depth and quality of sleep.

A medium-firm mattress has been shown to positively affect sleep quality and prevent sleep disturbances and muscular discomfort (43, 44).

The quality of your pillow is also crucial.

It can affect your:

  • neck curve
  • temperature
  • comfort

One small study determined that orthopedic pillows may be better for sleep quality than feather or memory foam pillows (45).

Additionally, the use of a weighted blanket could reduce body stress and help improve your sleep (46).

Lastly, the fabric of the clothes you wear to bed can affect how well you sleep. It’s crucial that you choose comfortable clothing made of fabric that helps you keep a pleasant temperature throughout the night (47).

Products to try

Having more comfortable bedding may make it easier for you to fall — or stay — asleep. Shop for bedding online:

  • weighted blankets
  • medium-firm mattresses
  • orthopedic pillows

Using electronic devices late at night is terrible for sleep.

Watching TV, playing video games, using a cell phone, and social networking can make it significantly harder for you to fall — and stay — asleep (48, 49, 50).

This is partly because electronic devices emit blue light, which has been found to suppress melatonin (51, 52).

Using these devices also keeps your mind in an active and engaged state.

It’s recommended that you disconnect all electronics and put away computers and cell phones so you can ensure a quiet place, free of distractions.

You’ll be able to fall asleep much faster if you practice good sleep hygiene.

If you need to use your devices late in the evening, at least consider blocking the blue light with eyeglasses or a screen filter.

Shop for blue light blocking glasses or a blue light screen filter online.

Aromatherapy involves the use of essential oils. It’s commonly practiced by those who have trouble falling asleep, as it may help with relaxation.

A systematic review of 12 studies revealed that the use of aromatherapy was effective in improving sleep quality (53).

Popular scents with positive effects on sleep include:

  • lavender
  • damask rose
  • peppermint

Oil blends made with ingredients like lemon and orange were also effective at improving sleep quality (54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59).

Although there are a variety of ways to use essential oils, many sleep studies are centered on inhalation aromatherapy.

An essential oil diffuser could be helpful in infusing your room with relaxing scents that encourage sleep.

Shop for essential oils online.

Some people have difficulty falling asleep because their thoughts keep running in circles. Research has shown that this can produce anxiety and stress, which can generate negative emotions and disturb sleep (60).

Journaling and focusing on positive thoughts can calm the mind and help you sleep better.

Writing down the positive events that happened during the day — or may happen in the future — can create a state of gratitude and happiness, downgrade stressful events, and promote more relaxation at bedtime.

In fact, a study of 41 college students found that journaling resulted in reduced bedtime worry and stress, increased sleep time, and improved sleep quality (60).

Practice this technique by setting aside 15 minutes every night to write about your day. It’s important to focus not only on the positive events of the day but also on how you feel at the time.

A different study found that writing a to-do list, if only for 5 minutes, was even more effective than journaling at helping young adults fall asleep faster (61).

Caffeine is widely used among people to fight fatigue and stimulate alertness. It can be found in foods and beverages like:

  • chocolate
  • coffee
  • sodas
  • energy drinks

This stimulant can have disastrous effects on your sleep quality and sleep duration (62, 63).

Although the effects of caffeine vary from person to person, it’s recommended that you refrain from consuming it at least 6 hours before bedtime (63).

Instead, you could drink a soothing tea like chamomile tea. It’s been shown to promote sleep and relaxation. Other bedtime teas that help sleep include passionflower and magnolia (64, 65, 66).

Good quality sleep may depend on your body position during the night.

There are three main sleeping positions:

Traditionally, it was believed that back sleepers had a better quality of sleep.

However, research has shown that this might not be the best position to sleep in, as it could lead to blocked airways, sleep apnea, and snoring (67).

Although individual preferences play an important role in choosing sleep position, the side position seems to be linked to high-quality sleep (68).

Reading could be a good activity to help you wind down before bed. At least for kids, it seems that bedtime reading may promote longer sleep (69).

However, it’s important to understand the differences between reading from an e-book and a traditional paper book.

Electronic books emit blue light, which reduces melatonin secretion. Lowered melatonin levels make it harder for you to fall asleep and cause you to feel tired the next day (70, 71).

Therefore, it’s recommended that you read from a physical book in order to relax and improve your sleep.

It’s believed that if you go to bed and try to force yourself to fall asleep, your chances of succeeding drop dramatically.

Instead, you can try paradoxical intention. This technique involves trying to stay awake instead of forcing yourself to sleep.

It’s based on the idea that the stress and anxiety produced by forcing yourself to fall asleep can prevent you from relaxing and snoozing.

Research is ultimately mixed, but some studies have showed that people who adopt this technique tend to fall asleep faster (72).

Instead of lying in bed worrying and thinking about stressful things, visualize a place that makes you feel happy and calm.

In one insomnia study, participants were able to fall asleep faster after they were instructed to use an imagery distraction (73).

This technique helped them occupy their mind with good thoughts instead of engaging with worries and concerns during the pre-sleep time.

Picturing and concentrating on an environment that makes you feel peaceful and relaxed can take your mind away from the thoughts that keep you up at night (60).

Certain supplements can help you fall asleep faster.

They’ve been shown to encourage sleep either by boosting the production of sleep-promoting hormones or by calming brain activity.

Supplements that can help you fall asleep include:

  • Magnesium. Magnesium helps activate the neurotransmitters responsible for sleep. Doses of up to 500 milligrams (mg) per day have been shown to improve sleep. It should be taken with food (74, 75).
  • 5-HTP (5-hydroxytryptophan). The amino acid 5-HTP boosts the production of serotonin, which has been linked to the regulation of sleep. Doses up to 600 mg per day, taken either once daily or in divided doses, seem to be effective in treating insomnia (76, 77).
  • Melatonin. The body naturally produces the hormone melatonin, but it can also be taken as a supplement to help regulate your sleep. Doses of 0.5–5 mg taken 2 hours before your desired bedtime, which is usually around 8 to 9 p.m. for most individuals, might improve sleep quality (78, 79).
  • Ltheanine. L-theanine is an amino acid with sedative properties. Although it hasn’t been shown to induce sleep, it could help with relaxation. Doses of 400 mg per day seem to be useful (80, 81, 82).
  • GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid). GABA is a compound produced in the brain. It inhibits certain transmitters and may help the central nervous system relax. Doses of 250–500 mg and no more than 1,000 mg are recommended (83).
Products to try

The supplements above can help you sleep better and feel calmer. Shop for them online:

  • magnesium
  • 5-HTP
  • melatonin
  • L-theanine
  • GABA

Having trouble falling and staying asleep is not only frustrating, but it can also affect your mental and physical health.

Using the techniques above can help you fall asleep quickly, while sleeping much better and having more energy the next day.

How to Fall Asleep Fast (in Five Minutes or Less)

15-08-2016 · 8 Ways to Fall Asleep Fast 1. Breathe with your mind. Breathing patterns play a role in our autonomic nervous system, which regulates heart rate,... 2. Get a mattress of the right firmness. There is no “one size fits all” for mattress firmness. Different people,... 3. Go caveman. At one point in ...

15-08-2016

Learning how to fall asleep fast sounds difficult, right? Try these strategies — all you need is your mind and your smartphone.

Some nights falling asleep quickly doesn’t come easy, and tossing, turning and thinking about not sleeping only makes it worse. You probably know the basic ideas like reading a book and turning off your electronics, but when those don’t work what can you do?

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Turns out, there are some unconventional tactics that sleep experts have stumbled upon that rely on your own biology and psychology to induce relaxation.

Here are a few creative but simple strategies you can try practically anywhere to snooze faster and sleep better tonight. Of course, these don’t replace medical advice from your doctor, and you should still consult a medical professional if you have serious sleep problems. But bookmark this page and give these tips a try, and you might be surprised to find that they can make a big difference between a restless night and sweet dreams.

8 Ways to Fall Asleep Fast

1. Breathe with your mind

Breathing patterns play a role in our autonomic nervous system, which regulates heart rate, muscle tension, motivation, and other aspects of relaxation or excitement. Whereas rapid, shallow breaths can create a sense of anxiety, deep, slow breaths can be calming.

One technique to try is the 4-7-8 method developed by Dr. Andrew Weil. The process is fairly simple, too. Here’s how to do it:

  • Place the tip of your tongue against the ridge behind your upper teeth throughout the exercise (inhaling and exhaling).
  • Exhale completely via your mouth, making a “whooshing” sound.
  • 4: Now, close your mouth and inhale through your nose to a count of four.
  • 7: Hold your breath for seven counts.
  • 8: Exhale slowly out of your mouth to a count of eight, making the “whooshing” sound (pucker your lips if it feels awkward).

Dr. Weil recommends practicing the technique by sitting down with your back straight before trying it lying down and repeating the cycle four times to start until you get used to it.

2. Get a mattress of the right firmness

There is no “one size fits all” for mattress firmness. Different people, depending on sleep position, activity level, body mechanics, age, and other factors will sleep better on different levels of firmness or softness of a mattress. If you want to get the best night’s rest, the best mattress is the one that matches your body type and sleep style.

That’s why Amerisleep offers five different types of mattresses. The AS1 is the firmest mattress ideal for stomach and back sleepers who want the firmest feel. The AS5 is the softest mattress that’s ideal for side and combo sleepers who put more pressure on their hips and shoulders.

Looking for something in between? The AS3 is the perfect balance of firm and soft that supports your body, no matter which position you sleep in. The AS3 is also a good choice for couples with slightly different firmness preferences.

Finally, we wanted to make sure our customers could try our mattresses risk-free. That’s why we offer a 100-night sleep trial where you can try any of our mattresses in your own home for 100 nights. 

3. Go caveman

At one point in time, before the advent of smartphones, nights used to be dark and cold. And surprise, modern science finds that both cool temperatures and complete darkness are ideal for sleep. According to circadian and sleep researcher Dr. Jade Wu, Ph.D. of Duke University, artificial lighting, and light from electronics can disrupt our biological clocks and tamper with our sleep quality.

“Keeping your bedroom free of artificial light and noise will not only ensure a nice, dark sleep environment, but also teach your brain that your “sleep cave” is for sleep only, not for social media, world events, and other things that get our minds going. This trains your brain to automatically relax when you get into bed.”

So, set up your bedroom like a prehistoric sleep cave. No television, laptops, tablets, or smartphones should be on when it’s time to sleep. Use blackout shades or an eye mask if your room can’t achieve total darkness, or if your wake up time is well past sunrise. 

Start dimming lights at least 30 minutes before you want to sleep to tell your body that it’s bedtime. Even better, switch lamps to dimmer, warmer-colored bulbs and use apps like f.lux on computers to minimize light’s impact.

Naturally, we don’t recommend going so low-tech that you do without a mattress and pillow. Those are two items that should offer high-tech features to promote swift sleep.

4. Chill out

Ever notice how a cold office seems to leave you ready for nap time? Researchers have found that cooler temperatures do indeed appear to help us get deeper sleep, and fall asleep faster. Plus, nothing feels as dreamy as wrapping up in warm blankets in a cold room.

Why does this work? Well, as our circadian rhythms approach the sleep phase, our body temperature naturally drops slightly and stays lower until a couple of hours before you normally wake up.

One Australian study found that insomniacs tend to have higher body temperatures overall. Those with sleep onset insomnia (trouble falling asleep in the first place) tend to stay warmer later into the evening, which may play a role in their inability to fall asleep. The good news is that, by shifting their biological clocks earlier using bright light exposure in the morning, they may be able to get back into a normal body temperature rhythm and fall asleep faster. 

Just as some people prefer it warmer or cooler during the day, there is no one-temperature-fits-all for ideal sleep, so be open to trial-and-error. If you want a go-to number to fall asleep fast in five minutes or less, try 65 degrees. It won’t be the only necessary ingredient, but it’ll be a good start!

Another way to help this process along is to soak in a warm bath for about 30 minutes before bedtime, further amplifying the temperature drop and potentially boosting deep sleep. You could also try sleeping in the buff since clothing can inhibit the natural process of evening out your body temperature as you rest.

5. Sleep on hi-tech

While lights and tech devices can be sleep stealers, modern advancements hold sleep benefits as well. High-tech materials and customizable beds can help improve comfort, helping you fall asleep faster.

Adjustable beds also allow you to change the angle of your upper body and legs. This can be particularly helpful for people who experience conditions like lower back pain or swelling since these adjustments can reduce back tension and promote circulation to improve comfort.

If you can’t afford an adjustable bed, a specialty pillow can still ease aches and stiffness. For example, a pillow for neck pain may have a contoured or shredded fill.

Acid reflux keeps many people up as well, and elevating the upper body can make a significant difference. Consider a wedge pillow for GERD along with sleep apnea and basic snoring.

6. Trick your brain

Do you know how sometimes when you try to do something, your stubborn brain backfires and does the opposite? Turns out, the principle of paradoxical intention (similar to reverse psychology, without the deception) might be useful for sleep as well.

A Scottish study found that the clinical use of paradoxical intention (that is, purposely not trying to fall asleep while lying in bed) resulted in reduced sleep effort and anxiety for insomniacs compared to doing nothing. Likewise, a separate study found that high intention to fall asleep actually resulted in worse sleep quality.

Instead of thinking about trying to go to sleep, tell yourself that you’re trying to stay awake for a few minutes. If a dark, quiet bedroom makes your mind run, you can also try listening to an audiobook or podcast on low volume, or visualize relaxing activities in your mind, to take the focus off sleep itself.

7. Daydream with purpose

For many people who struggle with falling asleep, rumination or unwanted thoughts can play a big role. Instead of drifting off peacefully, your mind slogs through the day’s events, embarrassing moments from years past, or tomorrow’s to-do list.

One way to break the rumination cycle or disperse unwanted thoughts before bed is to practice visualization or imagery, similar to daydreaming. There are a few ways to do this:

  • Simply visualize a calming scene in your mind, imagining and exploring it in detail — it could be a serene beach, calm forest, or anywhere else.
  • Alternatively, you might visualize yourself doing something positive but repetitive, such as shooting free throws.

It may sound hippy-dippy, but if you focus on it effectively, daydreaming about relaxing scenes can really help ease your mind. During visualization, know that it’s OK if your mind wanders. Simply return your focus to the scene, gently and without judgment. Try out different methods and audio tracks to see what works best for you. Visualization can also be a helpful mid-day stress reliever to keep in mind.

This also allows you to let go of future and past worries and live in the present, which can sometimes be exactly what people need to put their mind at ease and finally fall asleep fast.

8. Eat carbs at night

This tip will take prior planning, but one study found that eating carbs four hours before bed helped people fall asleep faster and sleep better. The research looked at simple carbs, which are quickly and easily digested. These include things like white rice, white bread and pasta, and potatoes (as well as sugary foods). Interestingly enough though, a Japanese study only found sleep benefits from rice and not from bread or noodles. Even if you are trying to minimize carbs, it may be most beneficial for your sleep to at least eat a serving for dinner.

The key here is to keep dinners simple and moderate in portion, so you won’t be bothered with indigestion later. Eating carbs four hours before sleep was more effective than one hour prior in the study, meaning planning your evening meals could prove helpful. Spicy foods can negatively affect your ability to fall asleep fast, so keep that in mind, too.

If you regularly have trouble sleeping, it might also be helpful to read about the basics of good sleep hygiene, and how to set your bedroom up for success. Better yet, consult a behavioral sleep medicine specialist, if your sleep problem doesn’t seem to budge even with these lifestyle changes. 

Have you tried any of these strategies? What are your recommendations for quick ways to fall asleep?

How to fall asleep faster: 9 techniques to help you drift ...

31-10-2021 · How to fall asleep faster: quick tips to try tonight. When your bedtime and wake up times are all over the place, your circadian rhythm becomes jumbled up. …

31-10-2021

In a perfect world, we’d all fall asleep in around 10 to 30 minutes, but that’s often far from reality. And as you’ve landed on our feature looking at how to fall asleep faster, we’re guessing you don’t fall into that neat little bracket either.

According to sleep experts at the Mayo Clinic, if it takes you more than half an hour to fall asleep you might be dealing with Sleep Onset Insomnia. And this does more than make it tricky for you to nod off – it can cause a lack of focus and memory fog the next day, as well as irritability. 

As the American Academy of Sleep Medicine explains: “Insomnia is the most common sleep complaint. It occurs when you have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep even though you had the opportunity to get a full night of sleep.”

So if you have trouble drifting off, it’s time to relax your mind and body, ready for some epic shut-eye. Here's how…

Woman laying awake in bed at 2.40am

(Image credit: Getty/amenic181)

How to fall asleep faster: quick tips to try tonight

When your bedtime and wake up times are all over the place, your circadian rhythm becomes jumbled up. So sticking to a sleep schedule can help you fall asleep faster. You could also try the following:

  • Make sure your bedroom is dark enough and cool enough, with a sleep-friendly temperature of around 18 °C / 64.4 °F.
  • Try not to eat any large meals within two to three hours of going to bed, as your body will be focusing its energy on digestion, not sleep.
  • Avoid alcohol too close to bedtime. Booze dehydrates you, which will wake you up and lead to disturbed sleep.
  • If you are still awake after 30 minutes of lying in bed, get up and do a gentle activity, such as reading, in another room until you begin to feel sleepy.
  • Racing mind keeping you awake? Try Cognitive Control. This CBT-i technique involves writing a quick diary entry to say what you are going to do tomorrow, and what plans you have put in place to do it.
  • The frequency offered by white noise is said to trigger sleep by creating a restful environment. Read our guide to white noise machine for more.

It’s also worth thinking about what you’re sleeping on. Waking up at night because you’re struggling to get comfy could signal that you need a new bed. Check out our guide to the best mattress for all body types, and our Black Friday mattress deals round-up for the latest early savings.

To instantly boost your in-bed comfort, also check out guide guides to the best mattress toppers for all budgets, and the best pillows for sleeping.

1. Fall asleep in minutes with The Military Method

Woman lays on bed with her eyes closed and earbuds in her ears

(Image credit: Getty/FreshSplash)

In his 1981 book, Relax and Win: Championship Performance, author and sprint coach Bud Winter outlined The Military Method for getting to sleep faster. 

This is an old technique used by US soldiers to help them fall asleep within just two minutes. The Military Method should make you feel more relaxed after a few sessions, but from our experience it takes around six weeks to be fully effective. 

To try it for yourself, get comfy in bed, then do the following:

1. Close your eyes and breathe out slowly, focusing on letting go of tension.  2. Relax your forehead, eyes, and jaw. Then let your shoulders relax, allowing the feeling to travel down each arm. Relax your abdomen and legs.

3. Now imagine you are lying on the bottom of a still canoe, upon a still pond, looking up at a beautiful sky; or that you are in a wide black hammock in darkness. Alternatively, you can repeat the words ‘don’t think’ for 10 seconds.

2. Get calm with the 4-7-8 breathing technique

The 4-7-8 technique (see video below) is based on an ancient yogic breathing technique. It was adapted by Andrew Weil M.D to help the sleeper control their breath to send the body into a deep state of relaxation. 

Try it yourself, close your mouth and inhale through your nose as you count to four in your head. Hold your breath for seven seconds. Then exhale through your mouth for eight seconds, letting your breath 'whoosh' out. 

Repeat all three steps three more times. Over time, build up to repeating the cycle a maximum of eight times in one sitting.

3. Don’t drink caffeine after midday

Ditching caffeine after midday makes a big difference to your sleep, especially if you have an early bedtime. While caffeine takes up to an hour to kick in, studies show that it has a half-life of around five hours.

So if it’s still in your system at bedtime it can exacerbate insomnia and affect the quality of slow-wave sleep, where we get our deepest and most restful sleep. 

How come? Among other things, caffeine blocks the sleep-promoting receptor in the brain and keeps us alert. Experiment with different times until you find a caffeine cut-off point that works for you. Don't forget, it's found in soda and chocolate too.

4. Try Progressive Muscle Relaxation

This technique is similar to a body scan (see below) but it mainly focuses on relieving physical stress. The aim is to relax the body muscle by muscle to help you wind down. Like the body scan, this technique gets more powerful with practice.

To use Progressive Muscle Relaxation, get comfy in bed then start from your lower body, tensing one muscle group, such as your calves, for a few seconds while breathing in. 

Relax these muscles as you breathe out, letting go of tension. Repeat this as you make your way up your body, or until you fall asleep (which shouldn’t take long).

5. Limit tech before bed (or use sleep mode)

Couple sitting up in bed both using their smartphones

(Image credit: Getty/praetorianphoto)

There are several reasons why switching off the screens an hour before bedtime is not only recommended by experts, but can help you fall asleep faster. These include:

  • Screen time increases alertness and anxiety. Whether it’s a pressing email or something on a social media newsfeed, once your mind is engaged and ruminating, it can keep you awake.
  • An article published by Harvard Health states that the blue light that emanates from screens is potentially harmful to our sleep as it reduces the production of melatonin, the hormone that controls the sleep-wake cycle.
  • The pinging of notification that come from your phone can disturb your sleep. If you need to keep the phone volume on, try placing it in another room. Also try a separate alarm clock or an energising wake up light.

6. Do a full body scan

General stress and anxiety can make it hard for us to fall asleep quickly, so dealing with that before you get into bed helps. You can’t force sleep to happen, but you can create the right vibe for snoozing by relaxing.

Body scans for sleep involve focusing on your body one part at a time, starting with your feet until you reach your head, bringing in awareness and releasing tension with focused breathing. 

The following 30-minute body-scan from Jon Kabat-Zinn, the creator of the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program, is an excellent place to start:

7. Tackle insomnia with CBT-i

CBT-i (Cognitive Based Therapy for Insomnia) tackles sleeplessness by helping you to pinpoint the thoughts and triggers that keep you awake. CBT-i usually takes around six to eight sessions with a professional, although you can take an online course too. 

Sleepio and Sleepstation are two of the best-known online CBT-i courses. They're designed to help you figure out your triggers for sub-par sleep, whether it's a racing mind, poor sleep hygiene, or something else entirely.

8. Do some light stretching or yoga

Experts at Johns Hopkins Medicine recommend some gentle yoga or light stretching before bed to help tackle insomnia. Focusing on steady postures and slowing and deepening your breathing helps prepare your mind for sleep.

Not sure what yoga stretches to do before sleep? We’re fans of Adriene Mishler, who has several bedtime-routine videos on her Yoga With Adriene YouTube channel. This one is great...

9. Drift off with a sleep meditation

Meditation apps are big pals with good sleep (we’ve used a whole bunch of them – read our Calm review for an example). From simple breathing sessions to bedtime stories, these chilled apps are designed to help you relax and drift off.

There’s plenty to choose from too, including Calm, Headspace (read our Headpace review), and Noisli. Many come with free trials so you can get a taste of how they could help you learn how to fall asleep faster. 

We’d also recommend a ‘boring’ podcast like Otis Gray’s award-winning Sleepy, which has “become a nightly source of relief for insomniacs.”

This article is part of TechRadar's Sleep Week 2021 (running from Sunday 31 October to Sunday 7 November), our in-depth look at sleep and how to snooze better. We've teamed up with experts in their field to bring you sleep techniques and tips to help you drift off easier, and have rounded-up the best sleep kit to transform your bedroom into a den of zen.

Read more:

Fall asleep faster with mental tricks to calm your mind

13-03-2022 · Fall asleep faster with mental tricks that calm your racing mind. By Sandee LaMotte, CNN. Updated 5:01 AM ET, Sun March 13, 2022 . JUST WATCHED Try this routine before sleep to get a good night of ...

13-03-2022

Try this routine before sleep to get a good night of rest

Editor’s Note: Sleep Awareness Week is March 13-19, and CNN’s Life, But Better Sleep section will have daily tips and facts you need to get a better night’s slumber. Join us!

CNN  — 

You’re exhausted, your body yawning for sleep. Yet once your head hits the pillow, your mind is flooded with worry, making sleep elusive, at times impossible.

Train your brain for better sleep with 3 expert tips

Don’t fret, experts say: There are relaxation techniques you can use to calm that racing mind.

“Think of these relaxation exercises as tools in your tool kit for better sleep,” said sleep specialist Rebecca Robbins, an instructor in the division of sleep medicine for Harvard Medical School.

“Practice them, and you’ll get better and better at falling asleep, which is the holy grail, right? No one wants to spend time tossing and turning at night.”

Deep breathing is a science-backed method of calming the body and mind that can be done easily before you get into bed and when you wake during the middle of the night.

Changing the rhythm of your breath slows your heart rate, reduces blood pressure and stimulates the body’s parasympathetic “rest and digest” system, which can take worry and anxiety offline.

“Consciously focusing on the breath can help you separate yourself from the darting thoughts that fly through your brain,” Robbins said.

There are a number of deep breathing techniques you can try. Diaphragmatic breathing, also known as belly breathing, focuses on relaxing the diaphragm, the main muscle of respiration. Start by taking a deep breath through your nose to a slow count of six, making sure that you can feel your stomach rise with your hand as it fills with air. Count to six again as you let the breath slowly escape.

The young woman is disturbed sleep from snoring husband sleeping nearby on bed in night time, then she used a pillow off the ears with a nuisance

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“Strive for effortless inhales that are soft and soundless while treating your exhales like gentle, extended sighs of relief,” suggested CNN contributor Dana Santas, a certified strength and conditioning specialist and mind-body coach.

Stay in the moment, Santas said, by focusing on the sounds and sensations of your breath: “Direct all of your senses to follow the path of air in through your nose, down your throat, into your lungs and out again. If your mind wanders, bring it back to your breath, happening in the here and now.”

Meditation is a centuries-old method of calming the body and the mind. Studies show it can help perfectionists stop judging themselves and can assist in the treatment of smoking, pain, addictive disorders and depression, among others.

Using direct measures of brain function and structure, one study found it only took 30 minutes a day of meditation practice over the course of two weeks to produce a measurable change in the brain.

Cut nearly 300 calories a day by doing something you already do

“When these kinds of mental exercises are taught to people, it actually changes the function and the structure of their brain,” neuroscientist Richard Davidson, professor of psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the founder and director of the Center for Healthy Minds, told CNN in an earlier interview.

There are many resources on the internet to help someone begin to meditate. Davidson and his colleagues have created a free, science-based app designed to help people practice meditation and mindfulness.

Visualization is another sleep aid. Picture a calm and peaceful spot in your mind’s eye and fill it with specific objects, colors and sounds. Researchers have found that people who visualize in detail were able to push unwelcome thoughts more successfully from their minds.

If you have trouble populating the scene, the researchers suggest asking yourself questions about smell, touch and light, such as “Can I feel the sun on my skin? What do I smell in the air?”

6 ways to wake up without coffee

You can also visualize your body relaxing, experts say. While breathing deeply and slowly, imagine your breath is a wind coursing through the body, easing stress and relaxing tension as it moves through each part of the body and then escapes.

“I like to think of the breath as a light in your mind’s eye that grows when you inhale and gets smaller as you exhale,” Robbins said. “Those tangible strategies where you visualize something and match that to a breath are really powerful.”

Most of us aren’t even aware of how much tension we carry in our muscles until it shows up in backaches and headaches.

How to tell if it's time for a 'sleep divorce'

Progressive muscle relaxation is a way of relaxing those muscles, thus making it easier to fall asleep, experts say. You tense and release muscle groups in the body in a certain order, starting at the head and working your way down to the toes and feet.

Each section of the body is tightly tensed and held for 10 seconds as you breathe in. Strive to squeeze each muscle hard, but not to the point of cramping or pain. Then, as you breathe out, relax the muscle suddenly and all at once. University of Michigan Health recommends you do the exercises in a systematic order that you can find here.

There’s an added benefit to the exercise, experts say: There’s no room in your brain for anxious thoughts.

Here’s a way to stop your mind from repetitively listing all the things you need to do (or haven’t done), but it only works if you do it before you hit the sack.

“Don’t worry in bed. Schedule a ‘worry time’ – a period of time outside of the bedroom, outside of sleep, to worry about the things that naturally creep in your mind at night,” said sleep specialist Dr. Raj Dasgupta, an assistant professor of clinical medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California.

The best alarm clocks (CNN Underscored)

“Write down a list of things you need to do tomorrow,” suggested Dr. Vsevolod Polotsky, a professor of medicine and director of sleep research at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

“You can even email it to yourself. It gives you satisfaction and the realization that it is night and there’s nothing you can do with your list, but you can attend to it tomorrow,” Polotsky said.

All these mental tricks and relaxation tips serve a purpose beyond that night’s sleep, experts say.

“They are extremely beneficial from a classical conditioning standpoint,” Robbins said. “If your body knows what comes after the end of these activities is sleep, then you start to condition yourself, and after a bit of time, your body will more easily slip into a state of relaxation, which increases your chances of sleep.”

How To Fall Asleep Fast (Military Method & More) Step By Step

11-02-2022 · Adequate quality and quantity of sleep are vital for staying healthy, both physically and mentally. While for some people dozing off is a straightforward affair, falling asleep fast can be a struggle for many. It's pretty normal to take about 20 minutes to fall asleep at night. Some disparity between people isn't necessarily a source of concern.

11-02-2022

Generally, your sleep-wake cycle is significantly influenced by the circadian drive and the homeostatic sleep drive. The homeostatic sleep drive is somehow similar to hunger. The longer you stay without sleeping, the higher your homeostatic drive will make you sleep.The body's internal clock (circadian rhythm) also influences wakefulness. For most individuals, this drive switches off at around 10 or 11 o'clock and can help initiate sleep. The process of transitioning from wakefulness to sleep also involves alterations in your brain's neurotransmitters. During the day, there are various transmitters, such as serotonin and dopamine, that help in promoting wakefulness.

As you start adjusting into nighttime, some of these neurotransmitters begin to shut off, thus turning on the nighttime circuitry. This, in turn, transmits impulses to your brain, telling it's time to switch off, rest, and restore.

How Long Should It Typically Take to Fall Asleep?

If you often find yourself moving restlessly in bed, you might ponder whether or not it should take you a specific amount of time to fall asleep (sleep latency). For adults, normal sleep means falling asleep within 8 to 20 minutes after lying down for the night.

Sometimes, you may have a hard time switching your brain off due to various factors (as we will discuss below). Alternatively, you might fall asleep instantaneously, especially if you previously had a difficult night of sleep or a particularly exhausting day.

So, What Makes This Process Difficult for Some People?

While numerous factors can prevent sleep, the most common causes are:

Stress - Stressful situations throughout the day can cause sleep deprivation. This is because the mind is left racing over thoughts, making it impossible to achieve preparation necessary for sleep.

Caffeine - Consuming large caffeine contents such as coffee, dark tea, energy drinks, or soda can make you stay awake and result in sleep problems.

Nicotine and alcohol consumption - Chewing tobacco or smoking cigarettes often leads to sleep deprivation. Drinking alcohol before bed can result in trouble falling asleep.

Insomnia - Insomnia is a complex sleep disorder that results from days worth of sleep deprivation. Certain underlying health conditions such as sleep apnea, avid reflex, and chronic pain may result in insomnia. Without treatment, chronic insomnia can result in causing obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, and mental disorders such as depression and anxiety.

Insomnia can be treated through Cognitive Behavior Therapy or over-the-counter clinical sleep medicine, including melatonin and CBD oil.

Tips and Tricks to Falling Asleep Fast

The techniques used in facilitating restful sleep are based on muscle relaxation and mindful relaxation. You’ll also want to make lifestyle changes that will help you improve your sleep hygiene. Combined together, these tips help you fall asleep fast and overall improve sleep.

Create a Consistent Sleep Pattern

You've probably heard about the value of sticking to a regular bedtime and wake-up time. But with the various changes to your weekly calendar - doctor's appointments here, early duty calls there, as well as weekends when you can actually sleep as much as you want - it can be pretty challenging to maintain a consistent sleep schedule.However, it would help if you kept in mind that irregular sleep patterns can significantly interfere with sleep as they interrupt your body's circadian rhythm. As your body's regulatory system, the internal clock signals your body to feel alert at sunrise but sleepy during the night.Going to bed and waking up at the same time every day can help your circadian rhythm keep a regular schedule. Once the body adjusts to this routine, it'll be much easier to go to bed and wake up about the same time each day. This is because your internal clock will be able to predict when to induce sleep.It's also vital to get about 7-9 hours of sleep each night (optimal sleep duration for adults). Remember to give yourself about 30 to 45 minutes to wind down at night before bed. This enables your mind and body to relax as they prepare for sleep.

Overall, try to stick to a regular sleep schedule as this greatly impacts how fast you fall asleep and your sleep quality in general.

Lower the Temperature

Your body temperature typically changes as you fall asleep. It warms up when you get out of bed and cools down when you lie down to rest. If your sleep environment is too hot, you might have difficulty falling asleep. That said, adjusting your thermostat settings to a cool temperature of about 60 to 67°F (15.6 to 19.4°C) could help.

Taking a warm bath can also help speed up the temperature changes in your body. Cooling off afterward can send signals to your brain to switch off. Note that individual preferences will vary, so opt for the temperature that suits you best.

Use the Military Method

The military method was first reported by Sharon Ackerman to assist soldiers to fall asleep while in stressful environments. Sleep is vital for soldiers since it allows them to remain active during the daytime and avoid making mistakes with dire consequences. This technique involves:

  1. Lying in bed in a comfortable position.
  2. Initiate breathing exercises, taking in big breaths and exhaling out.
  3. Release the tension in the jaw, forehead, and eyelids. As you do this, the body begins to relax starting from the upper body down to the thighs towards the lower legs.
  4. After relaxing the body, begin clearing the mind by repeating "don't think" over and over again whenever a thought creeps into your mind, visualizing a happy memory, imagining a scenic environment such as a field full of flowers with bright sunshine.

In doing so, your mind will relax and allow you to fall asleep quickly.

Try Autogenic Training

Johannes Heinrich Schultz, a German psychiatrist, created autogenic training from the theory of hypnosis. The relaxation technique uses several statements to curate a relaxed atmosphere in the nervous system, which then allows falling asleep faster. How it works:

  1. While relaxing in bed, center your focus on your breath and say, "I am completely calm."
  2. Shift your attention to your arms and say to yourself, "My arms are very heavy,"" I am entirely calm" six times.
  3. Move your attention to the legs and say to yourself six times, " My legs are heavy " and "I am completely calm."

Perform this technique with different parts of the body every six times while paraphrasing the statements to match each body section. When all the steps are complete, you should feel warm and relaxed. Repeat the steps until you feel ready to fall asleep.

Practice Body Scan

The body scan is a relaxation technique that promotes fast sleep. It involves bringing attention to yourself through small and slow movements on various parts of the body. Here, you'll have to center your attention on one section of the body at a time with the intention of relaxing that particular area.

How it works:

  1. While relaxing on your back comfortably, start intentionally moving your head in slow motions until you begin to feel your body relax
  2. Advance to the shoulders, moving them slowly until they completely relax
  3. Continue progressing slowly with each body section taking as much time as needed to promote total relaxation
  4. Once the body is fully at ease, you'll have an easy time falling asleep fast

Try Mindfulness Meditation and Yoga

Various research has proven that mindful meditation can help overcome sleep disorders. Meditation eliminates stressful thoughts and promotes mental clarity and relaxation, which leads to falling asleep.

To meditate, begin by:

  1. Sit or lie in a naturally comfortable position.
  2. Take your time to feel your surroundings when you are ready, close your eyes
  3. Take large breaths in and exhale periodically while focusing your attention on your breath cycle.
  4. Shift your attention to yourself and when intrusive thoughts come up, acknowledge them and release them from your mind.
  5. Try meditating for about 5 minutes at the start while building up resilience for longer sessions.

Yoga is also said to promote good sleeping behavior. Through breathing techniques and body movements, yoga allows you to release tension built up in your mind and body. This, in turn, helps you stay asleep longer and fall asleep faster.

Eat Foods Rich in Proteins, Carbs, and Vitamins

Certain foods have been associated with promoting peaceful sleep. These foods naturally improve sleep. They include;

Foods rich in tryptophan - Tryptophan is a naturally occurring substance that promotes good sleep. These foods include nuts, chicken, turkey, eggs, bananas, and milk.

Complex carbs - These whole grains, such as oatmeal and whole-wheat crackers, help you sleep faster and better.

Fish - Rich in vitamin B6, fish promotes better sleep through the hormone melatonin, facilitated by vitamin B6.

Kale - High in calcium, this green leafy vegetable motivates the sleep hormones to work and helps you sleep better and faster.

Fruits - Pineapple, tart cherries, oranges, and bananas decrease oxidative body stress and activate the sleep hormones, making you fall asleep faster.

Try Progressive Muscle Relaxation

Progressive muscle relaxation is a strategy that involves stressing different muscles in the body periodically and then relaxing those muscles in set groups. This is done by:

  1. Start by lifting your eyebrows which in response tightens the forehead muscles. Slowly release them, which releases the tension built up from the temples.
  2. Compress your eyelids shut, and then in slow motions, allow them to relax and fall over your eyes peacefully.
  3. Smile as wide as you can, focusing on building tension in your cheeks and jaw, then slowly release them and concentrate on feeling each muscle relax on your face.
  4. Repeat this sequence on your shoulders, fingers, stomach area, legs, and finally finish it up with your toes.

Once your whole body is relaxed, you will naturally fall into a deep sleep very fast.

Ditch the Tech Before Bedtime

Browsing the internet before sleeping is a common practice in this era of modern technology. Staring at the blue screen quite often leads to unwanted sleep issues. The majority of these devices release a blue light that imitates daytime sunlight which causes sleep issues.

To sleep fast, putting your technology devices away before bedtime will largely increase the chances of falling asleep and facilitate quality sleep. No matter how difficult it is, try as much as you can to part with technology while in bed, as it is necessary to promote healthy sleeping habits.

Create a Conducive Sleep Environment

Quite often, a cluttered, dirty room can prevent the mind from relaxing and interrupt your sleep schedule. This sort of living situation can feel overwhelming. To prevent this, maintain proper clean hygiene by clearing the trash out of your room, folding clothes, and picking up items from the bed and floor.

Keep your room cool by opening the windows during the day to improve air circulation. In doing so, your room will feel peaceful and embody the relaxation feel, which will help you fall asleep fast. Keep the room dark also to encourage restful sleep.

You can also:

  • Invest in a comfortable mattress. The mattress in your bed heavily impacts the quality of sleep. Using a bad mattress can make you switch positions at night, and wake up several times with back and shoulder pain. Such conditions disrupt sleep and make it difficult to fall asleep fast. Having the right mattress can promote deeper sleep sessions in a relaxed state. The right level of firmness and ergonomic standards provide body support and eventually help you fall asleep fast.
  • Use weighted blankets. These are heavy blankets used to create pressure on the body and stimulate the release of serotonin in mind. The pressure from the weighted blanket promotes calmness and relaxation.
  • Put your socks on. Having cold feet can often prevent you from falling asleep. When your feet are cold, the blood vessels constrict, which results in less blood circulating, which ultimately sends signals to the brain to remain awake. Therefore putting on your socks assists by dilating your blood vessels which allow the brain to allow you to sleep.

Closing Thoughts

No matter how difficult it is to sleep fast, avoid obsessing over it as it can worsen the situation. Staring at the clock while trying to sleep can only make your sleep anxiety worse. Place your phone facing down so that you are not tempted to keep checking the time or engage in pointless late-night surfing the internet.

Remember, falling asleep is meant to occur naturally; therefore, taking your mind off the focus to sleep will allow you to fall asleep even much faster. Allow your mind to relax by staying awake, and sleep will naturally take over. It's also important to remember that ADHD and anxiety can interfere with your sleep pattern. If the situation worsens, seek help from a trained sleep specialist to identify the underlying issues that may be disrupting your sleep and offer a viable treatment plan.

Related Content: How to Train Yourself to Sleep Early

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