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foodscene.net

Heat your nonstick pan or cast-iron skillet on medium-high and coat the bottom of your pan with olive oil, butter, or vegetable oil. When the pan is hot, place your fillets skin side …

allrecipes.com

Cooking Fillets Skin-Side Up. Salmon fillets are best cooked starting with the skin-side down. This prevents over-browning the meat, which can make it dry and pretty unappealing to look at …

thekitchn.com

Cooking the salmon at a low heat leaves a wide margin for error, so even if it’s left in the oven for a few minutes too many, it won’t overcook. The salmon comes out of the …

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More FAQs for how to cook salmon
  • How to cook salmon fillets?

    How to poach salmon: Yet another easy treatment, poaching works best for salmon fillets. Poaching involves cooking salmon in boiling liquid until the skin is flaky. The most time consuming part of poaching salmon is getting the cooking liquid to boil. Cooking time will depend on the thickness of the fillet.
    By Betty Crocker Kitchens

    Updated September 7, 2017

    Lemon and Parmesan Crusted Salmon

    Learn how to cook salmon, how to bake salmon, how to grill salmon and more, and you’ll always have a delicious plan to fall back on, whether you are hosting a dinner party or just making a last-minute weeknight meal.

    What's In This Article

    Grilled Salmon with Lemon Herb Butter Sauce
    Braised Salmon with Soy Ginger Sauce
    Grilled Dill Salmon

    A side of salmon is one whole side of the fish, which will usually come with the skin attached. Sides are great for feeding a crowd. Be aware, the thickness of a side will vary from head to tail. If you like your fish well done, measure at the thickest point and cook 10 minutes per inch of thickness. Cook frozen fish 20 minutes per inch. Add 5 minutes to the total cooking time, if the fish is cooked in foil or in a sauce. The easiest methods of cooking salmon sides include: baking, broiling or grilling.

    Salmon is widely available and at a variety of price points. Farm-raised salmon is generally more affordable than wild salmon. In the United States, wild salmon has a season, May through June. Wild salmon is available outside this season, frozen.

    When buying fresh salmon fillets, steaks or sides

    • The flesh should be shiny, firm and spring back when touched.
    • Avoid fish with dark edges or brown discoloration.
    • The contents should smell fresh and mild, not fishy or like ammonia.
    • Be sure to use the fish by the package sell-by date.

    When buying frozen salmon fillets, steaks or sides

    • The package should be tightly wrapped with few or no ice crystals and no freezer burn, which appears as dry or dark.
    • Fish packaged in clear plastic wrap on a tray can be frozen as is.
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    Salmon is very versatile. There are a number of different methods for cooking salmon. The trick is to pay attention, because it only takes a short time to cook salmon. The best treatment will vary by the cut of salmon.

    How to grill salmon: Grilling is the perfect way to cook salmon on a hot summer day when you can’t stand to turn on the oven. This treatment works for any cut of salmon, but steaks are especially easy to flip because of their thickness. It’s easiest to grill fillets with the skin on. Marinate the salmon before grilling to impart more flavor, but don’t marinate for longer than an hour. Fish will get mushy if allowed to sit in an acidic marinade for too long. Grilled Salmon with Honey-Soy Marinade is one of our go-to grilled salmon recipes.

    How to bake salmon: Any cut of salmon can be baked for a delicious, last-minute dinner. Baking is especially easy with salmon fillets and sides. It’s important to pat the skin dry before baking so the fish will bake and not steam. Salmon should be baked in a shallow pan, skin side down and brushed lightly with oil or butter. Beyond that, treatment can be as simple as a sprinkling of fresh herbs. Alternately, you can bake the salmon in a sauce or glaze. Baked salmon is done when the fish flakes easily and separates along the natural lines. For a simple and delicious baked salmon dinner, try the recipe for Asian Salmon with Potatoes and Broccoli Sheet-Pan Dinner.

    How to smoke salmon: Smoked salmon is moist and delicious and makes a wonderful appetizer. Smoking is also a more involved cooking method requiring special equipment, including a smoker and wood chunks. If you smoke your own salmon, you will want to use a large side so you get a greater yield for your efforts. For example, the Smoked Brined Salmon recipe is a favorite that calls for 2.5 – 3 pounds of salmon. The effort is worth it, but those who lack the special equipment don’t have to miss out. Smoked salmon is widely available for purchase.

    How to broil salmon: Broiling is another treatment that works for salmon fillets, steaks and sides. It’s a great treatment on a weeknight since involves very little effort. It does require vigilance, however, since the fish cooks quickly. One of Betty’s best broiled salmon recipes, Honey Mustard Glazed Salmon only takes 35 minutes to prepare. This recipe gets its flavor from a quick 15 minutes of marinating, which is just enough time to throw together a salad.

    How to poach salmon: Yet another easy treatment, poaching works best for salmon fillets. Poaching involves cooking salmon in boiling liquid until the skin is flaky. The most time consuming part of poaching salmon is getting the cooking liquid to boil. Cooking time will depend on the thickness of the fillet. Salmon is often boiled in a mixture of white wine, water and herbs or water. For a twist on this classic treatment, try the recipe for Poached Salmon with Tangy Asian Vegetables, which involves poaching salmon in stock, green onions and miso paste.

    How to cook in foil packs: This is one of our favorite ways to cook salmon during the busy summer months. Salmon fillets get folded up in foil packs with simple seasonings, like herbs, lemon, oil and salt and pepper. Then, you just stash the packs in the fridge until dinnertime. A perfect recipe is the Grilled Lemon-Salmon Foil Packs, which only takes 30 minutes total.

    Next, learn how to cook shrimp. Betty’s got all the tips and tricks you need to master cooking most anything — find how-to articles here.
    How to Cook Salmon
  • What is the best way to clean and cook salmon?

    Pat the salmon dry: Pat the salmon dry with a paper towel. Rub the salmon with oil, salt, and pepper: Drizzle some oil over the top of each salmon — just enough to coat the salmon — and rub it over the salmon with your fingers or a pastry brush. Sprinkle the salmon generously with salt and pepper.
    We independently select these products—if you buy from one of our links, we may earn a commission.

    If you want an easy, fancy main dish, it doesn’t get much better than roasted salmon fillets. It can be a midweek date night, an al fresco meal with friends, or dinner with the in-laws — salmon will rise to any occasion. I particularly like baking salmon in the oven, as it’s more hands-off than cooking salmon on the stovetop.

    Today we’re showing you the easiest, simplest way to bake salmon in the oven. It’s the kind of recipe to keep in your back pocket (although it’s hardly a recipe at all). Make it once and you’ll never wonder what to do with salmon again.

    This salmon bakes at 425°F, which makes for tender, buttery fillets that cook quickly. Even thicker fillets don’t take long: you’ll want to aim for four to six minutes per half-inch of thickness. Since most fillets are about one inch thick in the thickest part, start checking around eight minutes. When the fish starts to flake easily with a fork and the flesh looks opaque, it’s time for dinner!

    This salmon is baked uncovered. Simply rub the fillets with a little oil, sprinkle them with salt and pepper, then place them in the roasting pan skin-side down before popping them in the oven. 

    As with any fish, buy the best salmon you can find and afford. For more information about best practices for buying salmon, take a look at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch page.

    • Salmon Fact Sheet from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch

    Salmon is terrific with just a sprinkle of fresh herbs and a wedge of lemon squeezed over top as you walk to the table. If you’re in the mood for something with a little more pizzazz, try serving it with some pesto or a dollop of Italian gremolata.

    Comments
    • alcohol-free
    • paleo
    • dairy-free
    • low-carb
    • egg-free
    • peanut-free
    • shellfish-free
    • pork-free
    • pescatarian
    • sugar-conscious
    • gluten-free
    • tree-nut-free
    • soy-free
    • wheat-free
    • red-meat-free
    Per serving, based on 8 servings. (% daily value)
    • Calories 251
    • Fat 16.8 g (25.8%)
    • Saturated 3.7 g (18.4%)
    • Carbs 0.3 g (0.1%)
    • Fiber 0.1 g (0.4%)
    • Sugars 0.0 g
    • Protein 23.2 g (46.4%)
    • Sodium 270.2 mg (11.3%)
    • 1 to 3 pounds

      skin-on salmon fillets (8 ounces per person)

    • Roasting pan or baking sheet

    1. Preheat the oven to 425°F: Heat the oven to 425°F with a rack placed in the middle. Line a roasting pan or baking sheet with foil.

    2. Pat the salmon dry: Pat the salmon dry with a paper towel.

    3. Rub the salmon with oil, salt, and pepper: Drizzle some oil over the top of each salmon — just enough to coat the salmon — and rub it over the salmon with your fingers or a pastry brush. Sprinkle the salmon generously with salt and pepper.

    4. Place the salmon in the roasting pan: Place the salmon in the roasting pan, skin-side down. Transfer to the oven.

    5. Roast for 4 to 6 minutes per half-inch thickness of salmon: Roasting time depends on the thickness of your salmon, as determined by the thickest part of the salmon fillet. For every half-inch of salmon, roast 4 to 6 minutes — 4 minutes will give you salmon that is still a touch rare, 6 minutes will thoroughly cook it.

    6. Salmon is done when easily flaked: You can also check the doneness of your salmon with a fork. When the salmon flakes easily with a fork, it's ready. If you like, you can use an instant read thermometer to check the fish for doneness. The USDA recommends a minimum internal temperature of 145°F, which should be measured at the thickest part of the fillet.

    7. Serve immediately: Enjoy your salmon immediately. Leftovers will keep refrigerated for about 5 days, and can be gently reheated in the microwave or used cold.

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    How To Cook Salmon in the Oven
  • How long do you cook salmon on each side when roasting?

    Roast until salmon is opaque on the outside and just translucent on the inside, about 5 minutes. But don’t freak out if you like well done salmon: just keep roasting for another 3 to 5 minutes until it’s opaque all the way through.

    I'm a salmon hater too. These are my tricks for how to cook salmon I'll actually eat—plus, my full recipe. 

    Each product we feature has been independently selected and reviewed by our editorial team. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

    I don’t really like salmon. As a professional cook, I feel funny declaring any real culinary dislikes (I promise I only have a few), but no matter how many times I try it in a restaurant or cooking salmon myself, the fish is a hard sell for me.

    I desperately want to like salmon: It’s versatile, loaded with healthy Omega 3 fatty acids, and a nice way to change up the chicken-steak-pasta program that seems to have taken hold in my house. Now, I’ve finally figured out how to cook salmon so eating it doesn't feel like a chore. It’s a two-step process that anyone can employ for the salmon lovers and haters in their household.

    First, buy frozen, not fresh. I prefer to buy frozen pre-portioned salmon filets. Because they’re frozen fast and efficiently (on the boat from which they’re caught), these pieces of fish have little chance of going bad. The longer a fish has been sitting around unfrozen, the stronger it starts to smell and taste. Freezing ASAP ensures that the fish tastes as fresh (i.e. less fishy) as can be. When it's time, I pull as many salmon filets as I want to make out of the freezer and put them in the fridge to defrost—overnight usually does the trick.

    Second, stop pretending you'll acquire a taste for bare salmon. I would like to be able to enjoy the distinct flavors of the Cohos and the Kings, the Sockeyes and the Ketas, but I really just need some help. Enter sauce. Specifically, an herby, garlicky, vinegary mixture that works beautifully on a seared, broiled, or steamed fish, but also as a salad dressing, a roasted vegetable toss, or a dip for crusty bread. Here’s how to make Roasted Salmon with Herby-Garlic Sauce.

    1. Preheat oven to 500°F.
    2. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil and drizzle with olive oil.
    3. Add the salmon filets and turn to coat in the oil; season with salt and pepper.
    4. Roast until salmon is opaque on the outside and just translucent on the inside, about 5 minutes. But don’t freak out if you like well done salmon: just keep roasting for another 3 to 5 minutes until it’s opaque all the way through. This will mean a slightly dryer piece of fish, but the sauce will take care of that.

    While the salmon is roasting, make the Herby-Garlic sauce.

    1. Chop 2 small handfuls of one of the following (or a combination): flat leaf parsley, chives, basil and/or mint, anything tender and leafy. Place the chopped herbs in a bowl and add enough olive oil so you just see it starting to pool around the herbs.
    2. Grate a garlic clove right into the bowl—use a microplane for super fast and easy grating, or finely chop it.
    3. Add a couple splashes of red or white wine vinegar, a good pinch of salt, and several grinds pepper.
    4. Give it a good stir and then taste it. Is it delicious? You’re there. Is it sour? Add salt. Is it salty? Add another splash of vinegar. Do this until you want to put it on everything.

    When the salmon is finished cooking, transfer the filets to plates alongside a nice pile of tender lettuces. Spoon the Herby Garlic sauce over the salmon and the greens and squeeze a little lemon over top. And that’s a salmon dish even a hater would love. Need more salmon for skeptics? Check out this nifty sheet pan Salmon with Roasted Cabbage and Olive Vinaigrette.

    How To Cook Salmon So Even Haters Will Love It
  • How do you know when salmon is done cooking?

    According to the FDA, salmon should be cooked to an internal temperature of 145°. When working with good quality salmon, we tend to check for doneness with a fork rather than a thermometer. Once the salmon easily flakes with fork, it's good to go!

    If you’re new to cooking or not super confident in your skills, salmon can be a little intimidating. Which side do you sear first? What color pink should it be? How do you know when it’s done?! Please stop panicking, and cook more salmon.

    It's not only because you need that fish oil—which you do. It's that salmon can be one of the easiest things in the world to cook—you just have to find the method that works for you. Trust me, though it looks impressive and fancy as heck, it’s amazingly simple. Anyone can do this.

    First of all, which salmon should I buy?

    Valid question! If you're looking to make the most ethical choice, keep Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch app handy — with it you can search for the exact type of salmon that is available to you. Otherwise, go for the highest quality, freshest fish that fits in your budget. Don't forget that the nice people behind the counter have so much knowledge to share with you — they'll know what's freshest and most delicious, all you gotta do is ask!

    A note about how long to cook salmon:

    According to the FDA, salmon should be cooked to an internal temperature of 145°. When working with good quality salmon, we tend to check for doneness with a fork rather than a thermometer. Once the salmon easily flakes with fork, it's good to go! Just be sure you're checking the thickest part of the fillet.

    BROIL

    Ethan Calabrese


    Broiling salmon is one of the easiest and most hands-off techniques. To start, preheat your broiler to high and place an oven rack in the top third of your oven, so that the salmon will be about 5 inches away from the coils of your broiler.

    Place your filets on an aluminum foil or parchment-lined baking sheet (to prevent sticking!) and season thoroughly with salt, pepper, and any other seasonings you like. Here we used herbs, grainy mustard, and garlic, which is totally delish. Broil 5 to 8 minutes, depending how you prefer your fish.

    An easy way to check if the salmon is ready? Press against the corner of the filet with a fork. If the fish flakes, you’re good to go!

    BAKE

    Ethan Calabrese

    Similar to broiling, baking is super easy to master and perfect for a quick—but special!—Tuesday dinner. We especially love roasting one large filet instead of several small ones; it kills the presentation game.

    Preheat your oven to 350°F and line a large baking sheet with foil. Bake your filet skin side-down for 12 to 15 minutes, or until pink and opaque. You can go really anywhere with how you flavor it: In our classic recipe, the salmon is cooked directly on a bed of sliced lemons and seasoned with garlic, honey, and thyme. Any citrus works!

    PAN-FRY

    Brandon Bales

    If you’ve ever ordered fish at a restaurant, there’s a good chance it’s been seared, with a nice golden crust and skin so crispy you actually want to eat it. Good news: you can do it at home.

    In a nonstick or cast-iron skillet over medium-high, coat the bottom of your pan with the fat of your choice (we’re talking butter, veggie or olive oil) and get the pan HOT. Place your filets skin side-up (you should hear a sizzle) and cook until the filets naturally release from your pan with a spatula. (If it doesn't release, don't force it!) When the crust is fully formed, in about 6 minutes, it’ll be an easy flip.

    After flipping, let the skin get nice and crispy and cook for about 4 more minutes. (If your skin is getting too crispy and the center of your fish is still looking a little pink and firm, pop the whole skillet in a 350° oven and roast for 5 minutes.) The result? Restaurant-quality fish without the price tag.

    POACH

    Poaching is an easy way to ensure nice and moist salmon every. single. time. First, season the salmon fillets on both sides. In a large skillet, bring 1 cup water 1 cup dry white wine to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and add salmon. Cover and cook for about 10 minutes. Remove salmon carefully with a fish spatula or large slotted spoon.

    If you want to add extra flavor, throw some fresh herbs and garlic cloves into the skillet. Fresh dill tastes especially amazing.

    GRILL

    When it's nice out, you gotta grill. Those char marks = smoky flavor. There are two grilling techniques that we love when preparing salmon.

    First, up: how to cook salmon straight on the grill (or grill pan). As always, season your fish first. Heat grill over medium-high heat, and oil grates (to make flipping easier). Add salmon skin-side down and let cook 6 to 8 minutes, or until the bottom half of the fish looks opaque and the skin easily releases from the grill. Flip and cook 4 to 6 minutes longer, or until the entirety of the fish is cooked through.

    Grilled salmon foil packs are next! We love 'em because you can basically prepare your whole meal in one packet. And it's a really fun way to serve dinner to guests.

    First, choose your veggies and flavor components. You'll want to pick quick-cooking options, or slice things nice and thin. Zucchini, bell peppers, onions, asparagus, and thinly sliced potatoes are all great. As for the flavor bombs, we almost always add some sort of citrus, hearty herb (like thyme or rosemary), and garlic. Adding a tab of butter to each packet is always a wise move.

    Season everything generously with salt and pepper, and place on top of a large strip of foil. Fold the foil in half then fold up the edges to seal the packet. Place packets on preheated grill and cook until the salmon is cooked through and veggies are tender, 10 to 12 minutes.

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    How To Cook Salmon in the Oven - How Long to Cook Salmon
chefsandrecipes.com

Instructions Follow the instructions on the packaging for defrosting salmon. Add the salmon skin-side down to a large nonstick or cast-iron pan heated over medium heat with 1 tablespoon of …

newcookeryrecipes.info

Get ready to grill amazing salmon after watching this video. Nicole uses a soy sauce and brown sugar marinade, with hints of lemon and garlic, and it makes an ideal …

montalvospirit.com

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Season salmon with salt and pepper. Place salmon, skin side down, on a non-stick baking sheet or in a non-stick pan with an oven-proof …

justcooked.com.au

This Vietnamese salmon noodles recipe is a clever and healthy addition to lunch and dinner menus. Salmon, flavoured with ginger, lime zest, red chilli and garlic is sure to …

rossgastronomica.com

Always Start with the Fillets Skin- Side Down While the salmon will cook on both sides, the process should always start by adding the fish to the pan skin- side down. The skin …

rossgastronomica.com

Notes. *The FDA recommends cooking salmon to an internal temperature of 145°F, measured in the thickest part of the salmon filets. How long does it take to cook …

ulalda.nym.airlinemeals.net

How long does it take to cook a salmon fillet from frozen? How to cook frozen salmon in the oven: Preheat the oven to around 200°C, Fan 170°C, Gas Mark 6. Place the salmon in a …

quatodo.nym.airlinemeals.net

A quick pop under the oven broiler will give you a nice finish on the top of the fish and cook it through the rest of the way. Do you cook salmon in the oven covered or uncovered? Bake …

quatodo.nym.airlinemeals.net

A quick pop under the oven broiler will give you a nice finish on the top of the fish and cook it through the rest of the way. Do you cook salmon in the oven covered or uncovered? Bake …

ulalda.nym.airlinemeals.net

How long do I cook my salmon? Directions Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Season salmon with salt and pepper. Place salmon, skin side down, on a non-stick baking sheet or in a non …

How to Cook Salmon 7 Ways

This heart-healthy fish takes to all different types of cooking methods.

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This heart-healthy fish takes to all different types of cooking methods.

Each product we feature has been independently selected and reviewed by our editorial team. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

Yes, salmon hits the dinner-time trifecta. Delicious and easy to prepare, salmon is also good for you. It's a fatty fish with plenty of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, plus protein and an abundance of vitamins, including B vitamins, and the antioxidant vitamin E. To find out the difference between fresh and farmed salmon, check out Fresh Salmon Vs. Farmed Salmon: What's the Difference?

And versatile? You bet. Salmon is tasty baked, broiled, or tossed on the grill; smoked, poached, or cast into stews; fashioned into fish cakes and burgers, added to salads, or whipped up into dips and spreads. Salmon does it all. So let's get to it!

Fresh salmon should never smell fishy. The flesh should be bright and moist and not discolored along the edges. If you're buying a whole salmon, its eyes should be bright and clear; the skin should be silvery, shiny, and resilient to the touch.

Salmon in skillet with a nice sear

A terrific method for salmon fillets, it's quick and easy and develops a crispy, crunchy skin, too. In its simplest form, pan-fried salmon is simply salt-and-pepper seasoned fish, a little butter or olive oil, and a hot skillet over medium-high flames. Here's how:

Start skin-side up in the hot skillet with a little butter or oil. Don't touch it. Let the fillet sizzle for about 5 or 6 minutes. Then slip a wide spatula underneath the salmon, turn it, and cook skin-side down for about 3 minutes. A little squeeze of lemon, and you're golden.

Sautéed salmon fillets are a secret weapon for fast weeknight dinners. Here are several salmon fillet meals that are ready in less than 30 minutes:

  • Pan Seared Salmon I
  • Blackened Salmon Fillets
  • Chef John's Salmon

Tip: If you find a good deal on flash-frozen wild salmon fillets, buy a bunch; store them in your freezer, and thaw them during the work week for quick meals. No time to thaw? Here are tips on how to cook with frozen seafood.

A quick, no-nonsense way to cook salmon is oven roasting. And if you're cooking for a group, it's easier to fit several fillets or salmon steaks in a baking dish or sheet than a skillet. Here's a basic roasting method:

Season salmon with a little salt and pepper, and place skin-side down in a lightly greased baking dish or sheet pan; then bake in the oven at 400 degrees F for about 12 to 15 minutes. No need to flip the fish. Give some of these top-rated recipes a try:

  • Baked Dijon Salmon
  • Salmon with Dill
  • Chef John's Baked Lemon Pepper Salmon
Planked Salmon_Testing the flake

So quick, it's the don't-stray-from-the-kitchen method.

  1. Turn the oven to broil, and place seasoned fish on a sheet pan or untreated cedar plank (; Amazon) soaked in water.
  2. Slide it onto the top rack of the oven under a red-hot-glowing broiler -- about 3 inches from the heat source.
  3. Check the fish after 3 minutes. If it's done on the outside but you like it slightly more well done in the center, turn the broiler off and let the salmon sit in the oven for a few more minutes.

Related: Browse our entire collection of Broiled Salmon Recipes.

Can't decide between stovetop or oven-roasted salmon? Do both.

  1. Start with the salmon in an oven-proof skillet -- this time skin-side down; sizzle it for about 3 minutes in olive oil or butter.
  2. Then transfer it to a lowish-heat oven, about 275 degrees F, and cook for about 20 minutes.
  3. Now it's back to the stovetop for the final crisping! Give it some high heat for about 3 minutes until the skin is crispy. If time is of the essence, you can raise the oven temp to 400 degrees F for the roasting phase, and cook it for about 10 minutes in the oven.
Grilled Salmon with Simple Sauce

Can you handle yet another simple way to cook salmon? Grilling. It's not just for summer anymore. The smoky flavor it imparts on salmon fillets and steaks is a serious bonus. Grilling also makes for quick clean-up work. So unless the grill is buried under 6 feet of snow, consider it in the fall, winter, and spring. Here's how:

  1. Start with hot coals, and place a lightly oiled fish skin-side down on the grate.
  2. Give it a flip after 5 minutes. To turn, slide a spatula beneath the fish; if the flesh is sticking to the grate, let it go another minute or two, then try again.
  3. Cook the flipped salmon for another 5 minutes and check for doneness.

Related: 12 Ways to Enjoy the Best Grilled Salmon

Don't want the added calories of cooking fats? Poaching is a fat-free cooking method. It's also a great way to go when you're planning on saucing your salmon -- or are turning fresh salmon into salmon cakes.

A basic poach involves fish fillets simmered in water flavored with a pinch of salt, a few whole peppercorns, maybe a bay leaf. There's not much to it.

  1. Add enough water (white wine or chicken stock also work) to cover the fillet.
  2. For a gentle poach, bring the water or other liquid to a simmer, then slide the fish in, and cover the pan.
  3. Turn the heat off, and let the salmon cook gently for about 25 minutes.
  • Poached Salmon II
  • Pan-Poached Alaskan Salmon Piccata
  • Poached Salmon I

We could also call this salmon en papillote, but we'd have to charge a dollar more. It sounds elegant, but en pappillote is just French for "wrapped up in parchment." Regular old foil, it should be noted, works fine, too. It's a baking method that uses steam to cook a perfectly moist salmon.

  1. To cook your salmon in parchment, add the fish, along with seasonings (say, dill) and flavorings (lemon slices, perhaps), to parchment or foil.
  2. Close the parchment around the goodies, and bake in a 400 degree oven for about 12 to 15 minutes.
roasted salmon topped with herbs and lemon slices on a white platter

Get the recipe: Easy 5-Ingredient Roasted Salmon

  1. Air-frying salmon makes for an incredibly crispy exterior in minutes. Use whatever salmon recipe you like best, and simply finish with your air fryer versus the other methods.
  2. Make sure your appliance's basket is well coated with nonstick spray, and if you choose to use skin-on salmon, place the skin side down to ensure even cooking.
  1. Basic Beurre Blanc | This wine, cream, and shallot reduction sauce is finished with butter.
  2. Bearnaise Sauce II | A simple cream, wine vinegar, and tarragon sauce, it takes just 10 minutes to make.
  3. Basil Cream Sauce | Essentially a pesto sauce simmered with a little cream.

Here's a simple technique for homemade cured salmon. The brine requires just 3 ingredients: water, loads of kosher salt, and sugar.

Soak slices of center-cut salmon fillet (sliced to about 1/4-inch thick) in the brine for 3 minutes, pat the fish dry, and put it in the fridge to firm up. That's all there is to it. To the basic brine, you can add smoked salt, smoked paprika, or chipotle, if you like, to give it more of a smoked flavor.

Don't think you're cheating when you cook with canned salmon. There are at least 7 benefits to canned salmon -- among them: canned stays fresh longer, is typically cheaper, and has the same nutritional value as fresh salmon. Canned salmon is also super easy to work with. Browse our entire collection of Canned Salon Recipes.

Fresh salmon is best when eaten the same day you buy it. But it will stay for a day or two tightly wrapped in plastic and stored in the coldest part of the fridge.

You can freeze salmon for up to 6 months. To thaw, take it from freezer to fridge the night before you intend to eat it. Or if time is an issue, submerge fillets in cool water; frozen fillets should be completely thawed in about an hour or two. Never thaw salmon at room temperature because bacteria can build up in the thawed outer portions even as the center remains frozen.

Check out our collection of Salmon Recipes.

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How to Cook Salmon: Best, Safest, Most Popular Ways

21-03-2022 · To poach salmon, follow these steps: Pat salmon fillets dry. Season with salt and pepper or other desired seasonings. Combine 1 cup (240 mL) water with 1 cup (240 mL) dry white wine in a large skillet over medium heat. Let the liquid warm... Add salmon fillets to the skillet. Sprinkle in aromatics ...

21-03-2022

Written by Lizzie Streit, MS, RDN, LD on March 21, 2022Medically reviewed by Adrienne Seitz, MS, RD, LDN, Nutrition

  • Nutrition
  • How to cook
  • Safety
  • Bottom line

Salmon is an excellent source of protein and other nutrients. Plus, you can incorporate it into many types of meals.

Some people may feel intimidated by cooking salmon. However, there are many ways you can cook this delicious fish to fit your abilities and preferences.

Here’s an overview of the most popular methods of cooking salmon, salmon’s nutritional information, and safety tips.

A person seasons salmon that they are cooking in a pan.Share on Pinterest
Photography by Aya Brackett

A 3-ounce (85-gram) serving of cooked sockeye salmon provides (1):

  • Calories: 133
  • Protein: 23 grams
  • Fat: 5 grams
  • Carbohydrates: 0 grams
  • Vitamin B12: 158% of the Daily Value (DV)
  • Vitamin D: 71% of the DV
  • Vitamin B6: 41% of the DV
  • Potassium: 8% of the DV
  • Magnesium: 7% of the DV

Salmon is known for being rich in healthy fats. In particular, it contains the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

These fatty acids are thought to contribute to many health benefits, such as reducing the risk of heart disease and certain cancers (2).

Salmon is also a great source of lean protein. Getting enough protein in your diet is necessary for maintaining muscle mass and supporting other important functions (3).

Finally, salmon provides vitamin D, a fat-soluble nutrient that isn’t found in many foods. You need vitamin D to maintain healthy bones and proper immune system function (4).

Summary

Salmon is rich in heart-healthy fats, lean protein, and micronutrients such as vitamin D.

If you’re preparing salmon at home, you can use any of the methods below. Salmon is also available precooked, such as canned or smoked salmon.

How to fry salmon in a pan

This cooking method is usually referred to as pan-frying or searing. It’s a healthier option than deep-frying and still produces a crispy exterior.

To cook salmon in a pan, follow these steps:

  1. Pat salmon fillets dry. Season with salt and pepper or other desired seasonings.
  2. Heat oil or butter in a skillet over medium heat. For best results, use a nonstick skillet and enough butter or oil to coat the pan.
  3. Once the pan is hot, add salmon fillets skin-side up. Cook for 4–6 minutes.
  4. Flip fillets and cook skin-side down for another 3–5 minutes.

Cooking salmon in a pan is one of the easiest methods of preparation and does not require much time. However, it can be messy. Consider using a splatter guard to limit grease splatter.

It’s also important to use a cooking fat that’s stable at high temperatures. Extra-virgin olive oil and avocado oil are good options (5).

Some people find that pan-seared salmon does not cook evenly, depending on the shape and size of the fillets. For this reason, you may prefer to start salmon in a pan and then finish cooking it in the oven.

To do this, use a cast-iron or other ovensafe skillet and follow steps 1–3 above. After step 3, transfer the skillet to an oven preheated to 400°F (200°C) and bake for 6–8 more minutes.

How to roast salmon in the oven

Instead of pan-frying salmon before finishing it in the oven, you can cook it completely in the oven.

To roast salmon, follow these steps:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C).
  2. Pat salmon fillets dry. Brush with oil and season with salt and black pepper or other desired seasonings.
  3. Place salmon skin-side down in an oiled baking dish or on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and brushed with oil.
  4. Bake for 12–15 minutes.

Baking salmon in the oven is healthy, fast, and easy to clean up. However, this method won’t produce fillets with a crispy exterior like you would get with pan-frying.

How to grill salmon

You can cook salmon directly on grill grates or in foil packets over the grill.

To cook salmon directly on a grill, follow these steps:

  1. Prepare a marinade of your choice. You can make a basic marinade with 2 tablespoons (30 mL) soy sauce, 2 tablespoons (30 mL) extra-virgin olive oil, 1 tablespoon (15 mL) honey, and 1 minced garlic clove.
  2. Place salmon fillets in a dish, flesh-side down. Pour marinade over fillets, cover, and refrigerate for 30–60 minutes.
  3. Preheat the grill to medium-high (375–400°F or 190–200°C). Spray or brush the grates generously with cooking spray or oil.
  4. Remove salmon from marinade. Place salmon skin-side up on the greased grates. Cover and cook for 6–8 minutes.
  5. Flip salmon, cover, and cook for another 6–8 minutes.

To grill salmon in foil packets, follow these steps:

  1. Repeat the above steps 1–3.
  2. Remove salmon from marinade. Place it on a large piece of aluminum foil. Fold the foil over the salmon and roll up the edges to create a packet.
  3. Place the foil packet on the preheated grill.
  4. Cover and cook for 14–18 minutes.

Grilling salmon directly on a grill yields tender fillets with a charred exterior. However, salmon can stick to the grates if they are not well oiled, causing you to lose half of your dinner!

Cooking salmon in foil packets on the grill does not create a charred exterior but is a good way to prevent sticking.

How to poach salmon

Salmon can also be cooked in liquid — this method is called poaching.

To poach salmon, follow these steps:

  1. Pat salmon fillets dry. Season with salt and pepper or other desired seasonings.
  2. Combine 1 cup (240 mL) water with 1 cup (240 mL) dry white wine in a large skillet over medium heat. Let the liquid warm up for a few minutes.
  3. Add salmon fillets to the skillet. Sprinkle in aromatics of choice, such as fresh dill or parsley, bay leaves, and peppercorns.
  4. Adjust the heat to maintain a simmer.
  5. Cook salmon in liquid for 10–15 minutes. Cover the pan if it looks like too much liquid is burning off.

If you don’t want to use white wine to poach salmon, you can substitute chicken or vegetable broth. Here are more substitutes for wine.

You can even use a different poaching liquid such as coconut milk, vinegar mixed with water, or red wine, depending on the flavor you want.

Poaching salmon in water, wine, or broth typically does not involve using any added fats and is a healthy preparation method.

How to cook salmon en papillote

Another popular way to cook salmon is in parchment paper, referred to as “en papillote” in French. It requires enclosing salmon in a pouch so that it steams.

To cook salmon in parchment, follow these steps:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C).
  2. Place salmon on a large piece of parchment paper.
  3. Brush with oil or add a pat of butter to each fillet. Add seasonings of your choice, such as fresh herbs, garlic, salt, pepper, or a squeeze of lemon juice.
  4. Fold the parchment paper over the salmon and roll up the edges to create a packet. If you have multiple salmon fillets, it’s helpful to make a parchment packet for each one.
  5. Place the parchment packet on a baking sheet and place the sheet on the center rack of the oven.
  6. Cook for 12–15 minutes.

You can even add soft veggies that don’t take long to cook, such as zucchini, green beans, asparagus, or cherry tomatoes, to the packets to cook with the salmon.

Baking salmon in parchment paper is one of the healthiest cooking methods. It’s also easy to prep and clean up.

However, some people may prefer the texture of pan-fried or grilled salmon over steamed salmon en papillote.

Summary

Some of the healthiest methods of preparing salmon are pan-frying (searing), roasting, grilling, poaching, and baking in parchment paper. Each method requires a different cooking time.

To avoid consuming undercooked salmon, it’s best to test the internal temperature with a food thermometer. Insert the thermometer into the thickest part of the salmon to get the most accurate reading.

Salmon should be cooked to an internal temperature of 145°F (62.8°C). Cooking to this temperature will kill any harmful bacteria that could lead to foodborne illness (6).

However, some people prefer to slightly undercook salmon and then remove it from heat to let it rest for a few minutes. It will continue cooking while resting. This method may prevent overcooking.

If you don’t have a food thermometer, you can use visual cues to estimate when salmon is finished cooking. It’s typically considered done when it flakes easily with a fork.

But keep in mind that the safest way to ensure salmon is fully cooked is to use a food thermometer.

Those at higher risk of complications from foodborne illness — pregnant people, young children, and older adults with conditions that compromise their immune system — should always cook salmon to the correct internal temperature (7).

There is no standard range for the length of time to cook salmon. Cooking times vary widely, depending on the size and thickness of a salmon fillet.

Use the times recommended in this article as a guideline, but remember that you may have to adjust them based on the piece of salmon and cooking method you use.

Summary

To ensure that salmon is safe to eat, it must be cooked to an internal temperature of 145°F (62.8°C).

You can prepare salmon in a variety of healthy ways. It’s a great source of lean protein and healthy fats to add to your diet.

Whether you’re cooking salmon for the first time or want to mix up how you usually prepare this fish, there’s something for everyone on this list. You can choose to pan-fry, roast, grill, or poach salmon or cook it in parchment.

Each method has pros and cons, so consider your cooking ability and preferences when deciding which one you’d like to try.

Last medically reviewed on March 21, 2022

foodnetwork.com

How to pan-sear, bake and grill salmon.

Follow just a few steps, and you can achieve perfectly cooked salmon: tender and buttery with crisp skin. We walk you through how to buy salmon (including the different cuts you might see in the grocery store) and three simplest ways to cook it as well.

At most seafood counters, you can buy several cuts of salmon, including a whole side, individual fillets and steaks.

A whole side is exactly what it sounds like: it’s an entire side of the salmon. Typically, it’ll weigh four to five pounds and serve about ten people. Sides of salmon are well-suited to grilling because they don’t dry out, but you can also roast them in the oven.

Fillets of salmon are simply pieces cut from a side of salmon. They can look long and skinny or squarer, depending on the way the side was cut. They typically weigh six to eight ounces and feed one person each. This is the most common type of salmon cut you’ll find in the store, mostly because it’s the most versatile: you can pan-sear it, bake it, poach it or grill it.

Finally, salmon steaks are thick slices of salmon that are cut from the entire body of the salmon — perpendicularly to the spine. They weigh eight to ten ounces and feed one person each. Pan-searing and grilling are the most common preparations for salmon steak (check out Food Network Kitchen's lovely recipe for Grilled Salmon Steaks and Summer Beans).

Pull the salmon from the refrigerator about ten minutes before you plan on cooking, so it comes to room temperature and cooks evenly. Place it skin-side down on a plate lined with two layers of paper towels to soak up moisture. Eliminating moisture makes for super crispy skin.

When it’s cooked well, salmon is so tasty that you need not add flavorings other than salt, pepper and olive oil (although of course if you’d like to get creative, full steam ahead). Brush the salmon in olive oil and generously season both sides with salt and pepper.

Pan-frying salmon is one of the fastest and easiest methods to cook it. It makes for super crispy skin and tender flesh. Here’s how you do it. Start with a large nonstick skillet, which will ensure the delicate salmon skin doesn’t stick and tear in the pan. Heat it over medium-high, then place the salmon skin-side up in the pan. Cook until golden brown on one side (about four minutes for five ounce filets). Flip the salmon with a large thin flexible spatula (slotted fish spatulas are quite useful if you plan on cooking salmon often) and cook until it feels firm to the touch and the skin is crisp (about three more minutes).

Baking salmon is convenient because it’s hands-off and there’s very little mess or smell. This technique is not only great for fillets, but also larger pieces of salmon. Here’s what you do. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F and line a baking sheet with foil. Place the salmon skin-side down on the baking sheet and crimp all four sides of the foil to create a border around the salmon: this will help collect the juices so they don’t spread and burn. If you’d like, you can place lemon slices on the salmon, brush the surface with Dijon mustard or season the flesh with your favorite spices at this point. Bake until the outside is opaque and slightly firm to the touch and the inside flakes easily. Insert a small paring knife between layers to check; the color will vary from bright pink (rare) to pale pink to orange (well-done ).

Best for smoky flavor and super crisp skin, the grill is a great way to cook salmon when the weather’s fair. Just make sure you clean the grates of your grill and oil them before starting to cook, otherwise your salmon can easily stick. Preheat the grill to medium high, place the sinless side of salmon down on the grates and let the salmon cook. Don’t touch it — it’ll release itself from the grill when it’s ready. When it does, use a flat spatula to flip the salmon over. Need some inspiration? Check out Food Network Kitchen's Sweet and Spicy Grilled Salmon, Grilled Cedar Plank Salmon and Indoor-Grilled Salmon. Alternatively, if you value smoky flavor but not the stress of your salmon potentially sticking to the grates, you can wrap up a side of salmon in tinfoil and place the foil pack straight on the grill. For a full recipe, see Food Network Kitchen's Grilled Salmon in a Foil Pack.

Much like tuna, salmon can be cooked depending on your preference: rare, medium-rare or cooked through. Color is a great indicator of how well done your salmon is. As it cooks, the flesh turns lighter pink. A paring knife is your best friend when checking for doneness; slide the tip into the center of the fish to look at the color between the layers. When you remove it, feel the side of the knife. If it’s cool to the touch, the fish is rare; if it feels warm, the fish is medium-rare; and hot means the fish is cooked through.

Related Links:

Our Best Salmon Recipes

Our Best Grilled Salmon Recipes

Healthy Fish and Seafood Recipes

How To Cook Salmon So Even Haters Will Love It

Here’s how to make Roasted Salmon with Herby-Garlic Sauce. Preheat oven to 500°F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil and drizzle with olive oil. Add the …

I'm a salmon hater too. These are my tricks for how to cook salmon I'll actually eat—plus, my full recipe. 

Each product we feature has been independently selected and reviewed by our editorial team. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

I don’t really like salmon. As a professional cook, I feel funny declaring any real culinary dislikes (I promise I only have a few), but no matter how many times I try it in a restaurant or cooking salmon myself, the fish is a hard sell for me.

I desperately want to like salmon: It’s versatile, loaded with healthy Omega 3 fatty acids, and a nice way to change up the chicken-steak-pasta program that seems to have taken hold in my house. Now, I’ve finally figured out how to cook salmon so eating it doesn't feel like a chore. It’s a two-step process that anyone can employ for the salmon lovers and haters in their household.

First, buy frozen, not fresh. I prefer to buy frozen pre-portioned salmon filets. Because they’re frozen fast and efficiently (on the boat from which they’re caught), these pieces of fish have little chance of going bad. The longer a fish has been sitting around unfrozen, the stronger it starts to smell and taste. Freezing ASAP ensures that the fish tastes as fresh (i.e. less fishy) as can be. When it's time, I pull as many salmon filets as I want to make out of the freezer and put them in the fridge to defrost—overnight usually does the trick.

Second, stop pretending you'll acquire a taste for bare salmon. I would like to be able to enjoy the distinct flavors of the Cohos and the Kings, the Sockeyes and the Ketas, but I really just need some help. Enter sauce. Specifically, an herby, garlicky, vinegary mixture that works beautifully on a seared, broiled, or steamed fish, but also as a salad dressing, a roasted vegetable toss, or a dip for crusty bread. Here’s how to make Roasted Salmon with Herby-Garlic Sauce.

  1. Preheat oven to 500°F.
  2. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil and drizzle with olive oil.
  3. Add the salmon filets and turn to coat in the oil; season with salt and pepper.
  4. Roast until salmon is opaque on the outside and just translucent on the inside, about 5 minutes. But don’t freak out if you like well done salmon: just keep roasting for another 3 to 5 minutes until it’s opaque all the way through. This will mean a slightly dryer piece of fish, but the sauce will take care of that.

While the salmon is roasting, make the Herby-Garlic sauce.

  1. Chop 2 small handfuls of one of the following (or a combination): flat leaf parsley, chives, basil and/or mint, anything tender and leafy. Place the chopped herbs in a bowl and add enough olive oil so you just see it starting to pool around the herbs.
  2. Grate a garlic clove right into the bowl—use a microplane for super fast and easy grating, or finely chop it.
  3. Add a couple splashes of red or white wine vinegar, a good pinch of salt, and several grinds pepper.
  4. Give it a good stir and then taste it. Is it delicious? You’re there. Is it sour? Add salt. Is it salty? Add another splash of vinegar. Do this until you want to put it on everything.

When the salmon is finished cooking, transfer the filets to plates alongside a nice pile of tender lettuces. Spoon the Herby Garlic sauce over the salmon and the greens and squeeze a little lemon over top. And that’s a salmon dish even a hater would love. Need more salmon for skeptics? Check out this nifty sheet pan Salmon with Roasted Cabbage and Olive Vinaigrette.

The Best Way to Cook Salmon - We Tested 5 Methods

Salmon Method: Poached in Olive Oil. Method Details: Heat olive oil in a deep pan to 120°F. Bake the fish in the hot oil for 25 minutes. Cooking Time: 1 hour plus 25 minutes. Rating: 6/10. About this method: This less-traditional method, a kind of salmon confit, is often used to cook tuna in its own fat.

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The last time I was in Alaska, I had the most amazing, delicate, flavorful salmon fillets I’ve ever had. The flesh was buttery, melt-in-your mouth perfection, and was unlike any salmon I was used to. And that’s probably because I had, to my surprise, been cooking it wrong all along.

Popular methods for cooking salmon vary wildly from pan-seared crispness to low-and-slow roasting. Now, it must be said that there are many solid, weeknight-friendly ways of cooking salmon that we rely upon. The two easiest and most common ways of cooking salmon are in the oven on a sheet tray at 425°F (like this one) and on the stovetop with a little oil (like this one).

But what if I really wanted to reproduce the salmon I loved so much in Alaska? Which method provides the most return in the form of buttery, moist salmon, with the least chance of overcooking? I tried five different methods for cooking the most melt-in-your-mouth salmon and found one clear winner.

All tests were conducted using 6-ounce fillets of Copper River Wild Sockeye Salmon, patted dry, plus extra-virgin olive oil, kosher salt, and fresh ground pepper. When it came to rating each method, I was looking for a few things. First, I knew that I wanted that meltingly soft salmon. But an evenly cooked, perfectly flaky fillet wasn’t enough; I also wanted flavor and ease, with a method that required little time, effort, or expertise.

  • Method Details: Roast skin-down at 275°F for 15 to 35 minutes, or until fish hits temperature of 120°F
  • Cooking Time: 28 minutes
  • Rating: 5/10

About this method: Slow roasting seemed like the obvious starting point, but I was worried that the technique I chose to follow was almost too low at 275 degrees F. It did end up taking me toward the longer end of the suggested cooking time of 15 to 35 minutes, but it earned points for simplicity: Just brush the fillet with some EVOO, season it, and let the oven do its thing. 

Results: I wasn’t a fan of how often I had to keep checking the temperature of the fish, and it was tough to pull it out at precisely 120 degrees; it registered 123 degrees when I pulled it out. It certainly was moist! I almost didn’t think it was cooked, it was so juicy. The low oven temp also meant that there wasn’t a lot of carryover cooking happening once it was out of the oven either, making it next to impossible to dry the salmon out using this method. But the flesh was still bright, seafood-counter red and didn’t feel quite as firm as I’d have liked, and the flavor was just so-so. Without high temperatures to crisp skin or cook the proteins and render the fats, it was kind of bland. (If you’re still a fan of this method’s hands-off cooking, though, we think our own slow-roasted salmon recipe, which adds a lot more flavor and aromatics, may be good for you and would have ranked higher).

  • Method Details: Heat olive oil in a deep pan to 120°F. Bake the fish in the hot oil for 25 minutes
  • Cooking Time: 1 hour plus 25 minutes
  • Rating: 6/10

About this method: This less-traditional method, a kind of salmon confit, is often used to cook tuna in its own fat. As the directions specified, I seasoned the fillet and let it come to room temperature before placing it in an oven-safe pan and covering it with olive oil. It’s really important to fully submerge the entire fillet if you want it to cook evenly, and that can mean a lot of oil. Heat over low heat until the oil reaches 120 degrees F, at which point you’ll transfer the entire pan to a 225-degree F preheated oven for 25 minutes.

Results: I will admit that this method yielded the best-tasting salmon — but what would you expect from cooking something in fat? The oil infused the fillet with flavor and kept it moist, but not wet, and cooked it to just-yielding perfection. But the technique is fussy, and messy, and expensive (you can reuse the oil, but how often are you really poaching fish?) and despite starting the fish at room temperature, I felt the cooking was still uneven, with some spots flakier and others more rare. 

  • Method Details: Cook in a sealed sous vide bag at 120°F for 30 minutes
  • Cooking Time: 30 minutes plus at least 30 minutes marinade time
  • Rating: 8/10 

About this method: If you’re treating salmon like steak (as you should), then sous vide might be your jam. Fans of this technique, which is basically cooking vacuum-sealed proteins gently in a water bath, love its precision, which allows you to choose the exact doneness of your fish. I opted for 120 degrees F, which the accompanying chart described as “very moist, tender, and flaky.” After bringing the pot of water to that temperature and attaching my Joule sous vide, I placed my seasoned, oil-coated salmon in a bag into the water and set the timer. The device kept the water temperature at a constant while I walked away and did other things. 

Results: The cook time of 30 minutes is a bit longer than other methods, but you don’t need to pay attention and can use that time to prep side dishes. There’s also no cleanup involved after, and the salmon was superb and just as described. I prefer my salmon a little firm and flaky and maybe this close to being overdone, and this hit that mark exactly. The only fussy bit is needing to use a marinade if you want to add any aromatics or flavors. Also, of course, needing a sous vide setup, which is still not a common piece of gear for most home cooks.

  • Method Details: Bake in a crimped-shut parchment paper packet at 375ºF for 12 to 14 minutes.
  • Cooking Time: 15 minutes 
  • Rating: 8.5/10

About this method: Cooking en papillote is the fancy French way for saying “in paper.” Parchment packets are designed for cooking individual portions, and basically steam the contents so everything comes out moist and delicious. I followed this method, but only added salmon and oil, no vegetables, to the parchment oval, then crimped the edges and put the whole baking sheet in a 375-degree F oven.

Results: Now this is a foolproof method, and fast, too. I reduced the cooking time slightly since I was doing salmon solo, but even at 12 minutes a thermometer read 144 degrees. I thought for sure my fillet would be overcooked and dry, but was surprised to discover it was far from it. Some areas were pinker than others, but overall it was tasty, plenty moist, yet still slightly firm. And the cleanup was effortless. 

  • Method Details: Brine for 15 minutes in salt water. Sear in a nonstick pan over medium-high heat for 12 to 16 minutes total, flipping once.
  • Cooking Time: About 30 minutes total 
  • Rating: 10/10

About this method: Wet brining has always worked wonders on chicken for me, and salmon spends half its life in salt water anyway, so this method made sense to me. After a quick 15-minute soak, I patted the fillet off and placed it in a dry, cold pan, fired the heat to medium-high, and cooked it for six minutes per side. Boom, done.

Results: I love anything you can start in a cold pan because I’m too impatient for pre-heating. This method didn’t use fat but somehow still managed to deliver the fish that was almost as flavorful as the fillet cooked in oil. The combination of brine and higher heat produced a moist, flaky fillet with a still-pink and tartare-esque center, like a perfectly medium-rare steak. It was fast, easy, and delicious. Winner, winner, salmon dinner.  

Want to see how to properly pan-sear and cook a piece of fish on the stove? You must watch this Cooking School video.

What do you think of our results? Do you have another foolproof method you swear by that we missed? Tell us!

Jill Waldbieser

Contributor

How Long to Cook Salmon

According to the USDA, fish and shellfish should be cooked to a minimum internal temperature of 145 degrees F (63 degrees C). However, the internal temperature will continue to rise after cooking, so if you prefer, you can cook your salmon to 130 degrees F (54 degrees C) and allow it to rest for several minutes.

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