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How much do you tip your barber or hair stylist? Page 2 of 2 [ 25 posts ] Go to page Previous 1, 2 Previous topic | Next topic : Author Message; RadioNut39 Post subject: Re: How much do you tip your barber or hair stylist? Posted: Apr Sat 09, 2022 1:08 pm . Member: Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am

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If you happen to have an appointment during the holiday season, it’s nice to increase your usual gratuity as a gesture of cheer and thanks. “The standard 18 to 20 percent tip will be more than ...

How Much to Tip Your Hairdresser: Our Complete Guide

How Much to Tip Your Stylist Cristina Cianci When it comes to tipping, "the standard practice among satisfied clients tends to be 20%" according to Tran and Stenson.

Hairstylists are so much more than just “that person who cuts my hair.” Case in point: that time you used your appointment as your personal therapy session and vented about your roommate issues for the entire duration of your cut (no judgment). In the end, we want to make our hairstylists happy, because they, in turn, make us very, very happy.

But beyond standard tipping rules, there’s a lot of gray area—which is exactly why we asked four celeb hairstylists all the questions you might feel too awkward to ask on your own. Hairstylists Anh Co Tran, Tanya Abriol, Nick Stenson, and Matthew Monzon give us the scoop on what you should really do if you’re running late or unsatisfied with your cut, how much to tip your hairdresser, and more. Keep scrolling to read what they want clients to know about hair salon etiquette.

 Sunny Eckerle / Byrdie

Sure, we all want to be on time, but the reality is that, well, things come up. Your hairdresser will understand, won't they? I mean, there has to be a grace period for hair appointment tardiness, right? Tran says, "Typically, 15 minutes is too late because we work in 15-minute intervals here at the salon. If a client shows up super late, it causes me to run late the rest of my day." Abrio agrees: "Showing up 15 minutes late really is the limit, taking in consideration that typically each service takes an hour. Consulting what you want to change about your look, getting washed, and settled in takes another 15 minutes… At that point, it has run into 30 minutes of your appointment time."

Sweenshots & Shaymone / Stocksy

So in case you find yourself running a bit behind for your hair appointment, Monzon recommends "you should really call the salon and let them know. It’s a courtesy that really helps all people involved: the stylist, the receptionist, the next client, and yourself." As to when you should call, Abrio says, "at least 30 minutes before [your] appointment time. Stylists will, at that point, need to adjust the rest of their day so clients after them aren’t waiting." And if you happen to know earlier in the day that you're going to be late to your appointment, it's better to give the salon a heads up then or "ASAP," says Tran.

Based on how late you expect to be, Stenson recommends "Clients should give the salon a courtesy call and be given the option of rescheduling." If you find yourself creeping over the 15 to 20-minute grace period, well, "don’t always expect your stylist or the receptionist to be able to sort it out," says Monzon. He adds, "If you’re running more than 30 minutes late, you should plan on either rescheduling your appointment or know that you may have to wait some time. Know that your hairdresser wants to make you happy and help make you beautiful. But by being late, you’re cutting into everybody else’s time."

Know that your hairdresser wants to make you happy and help make you beautiful. But by being late, you’re cutting into everybody else’s time.

Today, with technology on overdrive, so much of our lives can be spent without any real human interaction (think: online shopping, food delivery apps, and the list goes on). And while we are proponents of convenience, there's something satisfying about in-person experiences—sometimes a visit to the salon is just what the doctor ordered. For many of us, our hairdressers are more than just stylists, they can serve as soundboards for our pent-up frustrations or even act as great sources of sage advice. But how do stylists feel about their client's chit-chat?

Alexander Kozlovich / Stocksy

Stenson says, "Listening is part of the business of a hairdresser. We expect to know things about our clients, and frankly, we’re here to listen." But, when it comes to oversharing, Monzon says, "Depending on your relationship with your stylist, it can be a bit awkward when you share intimate or personal information. As relationships continue and you get to know someone better, maybe then a bit more information is acceptable. But if you think it may be a bit too risqué or politically charged, it probably is."

Overall, "The salon experience is different for everybody. Some prefer to just take the time for themselves and not chat; some may want to chat about the latest gossip. The most important thing is to start a conversation with your stylist about the service that you want done with your hair," says Monzon.

Bring pictures and references to show what is inspiring you so that you and your stylist are clear on what the finished result should be. That should always be the first conversation.

Stenson believes in making the most of your salon visit, especially when it comes to getting your stylist's professional advice. He says, "I especially enjoy when clients are interested in making sure to take the best precautions to take care of their hair and ask me for recommendations. Right now I’m loving Matrix Biolage ExquisiteOil Protective Treatment (). It provides a lightweight replenishment and is great for all hair types. I recommend it to all of my clients!"

Nowadays, our cell phones have become extensions of ourselves. We take them everywhere we go, including the salon. Abrio acknowledges the trend and says, "Being on the phone texting during an appointment is such a common thing now. I think if you’re in the middle of a conversation, it’s rude, but if it’s not affecting the stylist and their work, it’s fine."

As for phone calls, however, Tran takes a firmer position: "It’s not okay. It gets in the way almost 100% of the time." Stenson adds, "Talking on the phone makes it difficult for a hairdresser to work and is very rude. The stylist and client need to have a mutual respect."

If you are expecting an important phone call, it's best to tell your hairstylist. They might not have a problem with it as long as you you're courteous and let them know beforehand.

Monzon adds, "Texting and cell phone usage have changed the way hairdressers work." He goes on to offer us his advice when he says, "Timing is important. For example, if you’re getting color applied, most likely it’s fine. If you're getting a sharp, one-length haircut where the balance is important, it’s definitely not a good time to be chatting or texting. But being in the salon, you should use the time to unplug, relax, and enjoy the experience of being taken care of."

Cristina Cianci

When it comes to tipping, "the standard practice among satisfied clients tends to be 20%" according to Tran and Stenson. Abrio adds, "Tips are a funny thing. I personally always tip according to my experience. I hate the percentage rule. It’s a good guideline, but a tip is a gift, and it’s such a personal situation."

Typically, it's not just your stylist who is serving you, but their assistants, as well. Whether you should be tipping the person shampooing your hair, Trans responds, "Absolutely. My assistants work very hard to keep my day running smoothly and help the client have a satisfactory experience at the salon. Anywhere from to ."

Monzon explains, "When it comes to the assistants, know that these people are training to become better and more knowledgeable hairdressers. They’re living on the tips that they’re making. When someone knows how to rinse all that color out of your hair and gives you an amazing shampoo and scalp massage, all while keeping you dry, that’s when you can decide how much it’s worth. I know many clients think of the shampoo and scalp massage as their favorite part of the salon experience."

But what about if you're unsatisfied? Should you still tip then? And if so, how much? Our four celeb stylists all agreed that they don't expect clients to tip if they are not satisfied. "If a client is still unhappy after I’ve tried fixing their haircut, I wouldn’t expect them to tip. I would expect little or no tip until you redeem yourself the next time," says Abrio.

Maingaila Muvundika / Stocksy

Unfortunately, not all salon visits meet your expectations. Sometimes your new 'do can leave you feeling underwhelmed, if not, disappointed. Just know this: If you find yourself unhappy with your cut or style, all is not lost. Our hairstylists all agree that if you're not satisfied with your hair, you should definitely speak up immediately so the issue can be resolved. "Clients should never leave the salon unhappy," says Stenson. And while the earlier you say something the better, Abrio adds, "Even if a client calls up two weeks later, they should feel comfortable calling and speaking up. Trust me, we’d rather make you happy than lose you as a client… most of the time."

So let's say that a client does decide to come back to the salon to fix a haircut or color they were unsatisfied with, should they still tip? Stenson believes, "If it’s a return visit, tipping is again a personal preference based on the circumstances. It’s always appreciated but not expected."

Monzon elaborates, "If a client wants to change their long hair to a more modern length and then decides two days later they don’t like it, I think expecting any sort of compensation or refund would be completely inappropriate. But if they’re returning to fix or modify a haircut and the outcome is positive, I think the tip is at the client’s discretion."

While hairstylists are happy to oblige unsatisfied clients on a return visit, this is not ideal for them nor the client. Ideally, clients would be happy after their original appointment. "A client being unhappy is an unfortunate situation," says Monzon. So to ensure clients leave satisfied, he emphasizes "this is why references and inspiration pictures are important. Also, being upfront about the past history of your hair is very, very important, especially when it comes to chemical services."

People also ask
  • How much tip should you give a hair stylist?

    You love the results of your salon visitYou and your stylist have a good relationshipYou want to forge a good relationship with a new stylistYour stylist worked you in when there were no appointments availableYou don’t visit the salon very often, but always come to the same stylist More items...

    How much to tip hairdresser… that’s the question I’m asked on a daily basis. Don’t worry — I’ll answer this in great detail and cover all you need to know in my complete tipping etiquette guide below.

    How Much Should You Tip a Hairdresser?

    Hair Salon Tipping Cheat Sheet showing a few different rules of thumb

    Tipping is a common and often expected practice in hair salons. But do you know how much to tip a hairdresser? Maybe you’ve been to the hair salon and gotten a cut, color, or style you love and want to show your appreciation.

    Or maybe you visited a new salon and didn’t really dig the results. Is a tip still warranted? If you’re like most people, you want to offer an acceptable tip to your stylist – without undertipping or overtipping.

    You could leave 10%, 15%, 20%, or more. So where’s the sweet spot?

    The Quick Answer:

    Hairdressers rely on tips for additional income and to indicate how satisfied their clients are with their work. Tip your hairdresser at least 10%, but preferably 15% or 20%.

    If it’s an exceptional cut, color, or style, you can tip more than 20% to show your appreciation. Ten percent tips are considered low, but if you didn’t love the results or if your hair is very short, it’s acceptable.

    If you had a bad experience at the salon and won’t be returning, or if an honest mistake was made and you may still come back, this amount may be appropriate. 

    Fifteen to 20% tips are always welcomed and appreciated – you can’t go wrong with these amounts. If you liked or loved the results, are a regular or plan to be, or if it’s your first time at a new salon with a stylist you like, tip at least 15%.

    Twenty percent is even better. Situations that warrant not leaving a tip are rare, but you don’t necessarily need to leave a tip if something went horribly wrong.

    In this post, we explain the salon etiquette for tipping your hairdresser. We’ll show you how to decide which amount is right for your situation and when it’s appropriate to skip tipping altogether.

    Then we’ll give a few examples to show how much you might tip in different scenarios. Be sure to read until the very end — you don’t want to gyp your stylist out of a hard-earned tip.

    Salon Tipping Quick Reference

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    If you’re in a hurry, refer to the above salon tipping guide. Just find your bill (always round up), pick your level of service, and you’ll know exactly how much to tip. And be sure to read the rest of this post. It’ll help you score big points with your stylist!

    How Much to Tip a Hairdresser

    A tip is a percentage of the total bill, and is paid directly to the stylist. It’s paid in addition to the cost of the services you had done at the salon. Most salons don’t include tips or gratuity in the cost of their services, so you’ll need to decide how much you want to leave.

    When to Leave a 10% Tip

    When to leave a 10% tip for your hair stylist graphic

    Leaving a 10% tip isn’t the norm in hair salons. After putting in time and effort to get the results you wanted, be aware that some stylists will consider a 10% to be a personal slight against them, or a sign that you’re too cheap to tip “properly.” 

    It’s also not uncommon for stylists to share tipping information with others in the salon, possibly making it harder for you to book an appointment afterward.

    Ten percent is considered a low tip, but it is still acceptable in some situations. A tip of 10% might indicate: “I feel obligated to leave a tip, but I don’t want to leave much.” 

    You can leave a 10% tip if…

    • You just came in for a quick trim or small service
    • Your hair is very short and didn’t take long for the stylist to do
    • You’re coming back in a short time for a more expensive service
    • You didn’t love the results of your cut, color, or style and won’t be returning

    When to Leave a 15% Tip

    When to tip 15% graphic, found in a piece on how much to tip hairdressers

    A 15% tip is the average amount left by clients for their stylists. This is a common tipping percentage in different industries. A 15% tip is always appropriate and appreciated.

    If you’re on the fence about how much you should tip, opt to leave this amount. A 15% tip might indicate: “You did a good job on my hair, and you deserve a little something extra for your work.” 

    You should leave a 15% tip if…

    • You came in for a regular salon visit
    • It’s your first time at a new salon
    • You liked the stylist/results
    • You’re unsure how much to tip your hairdresser
    • Your visit took an average amount of time
    • Your service was expensive, and you need to stay within a budget

    When to Leave a 20% Tip

    For a piece on how much to tip hairdresser, a graphic explaining when to tip 20%

    A 20% tip is a little higher than the norm. But many salon regulars who have a good relationship with their stylist report leaving 20% tips each time they visit. In fact, I always tip my stylist 20%.

    A 20% tip helps you forge a relationship with a new stylist by showing them how much you appreciate their expertise and time. A 20% tip might indicate: “You did a great job, I love the results, and I’ll be coming back.” 

    You should leave a 20% tip if…

    • You love the results of your salon visit
    • You and your stylist have a good relationship
    • You want to forge a good relationship with a new stylist
    • Your stylist worked you in when there were no appointments available
    • You don’t visit the salon very often, but always come to the same stylist
    • Holidays or a stylist’s special occasion is coming up (wedding, baby shower, birthday, etc.)
    • Your stylist spent extra time on your hair to give you the results you wanted

    When to Tip More Than 20%

    When to tip hairdresser more than 20 percent graphic

    It doesn’t happen as often, but clients do tip more than 20% for their stylists in some situations. A big tip higher than 20% really stands out to a hairdresser.

    It indicates, “My visit today was really something special. I’m blown away by the results, and I’m definitely coming back.” 

    You should leave a tip more than 20% if…

    • Your stylist perfectly executed the cut/style/color you wanted, and you’re thrilled with it
    • The price of your visit was much lower than you expected and you feel it was worth more
    • Your stylist worked you in when there were no appointments available, or came in at a time they don’t usually work to make it convenient for you
    • Your stylist came to you or did your hair (or multiples) for a very special occasion 
    • Holidays or a stylist’s special occasion is coming up and you want to do something really special for them
    • Your stylist has been going through a rough patch (illness, finances, relationships, etc.) and you’re in a position to offer a larger tip in their time of need

    When to Skip the Tip

    Graphic showing the reasons to skip a tip when at a hair salon

    Let’s get this out there: Situations that warrant skipping the tip entirely are rare. Only the most dire of salon circumstances would call for leaving no tip at all.

    Even if leaving the salon slightly dissatisfied with the results, most customers will still leave a 10% tip at minimum. But these situations do happen occasionally, and if you think one of them has happened to you, feel free to skip the tip.

    You don’t have to leave a tip if…

    • The stylist says they don’t accept tips
    • The stylist ignored or “overrode” your wants (i.e., you asked for a 1” trim and they took off 3”) and it can’t easily be fixed 
    • The stylist genuinely damaged your hair with chemicals or heat and there’s no way to make it right
    • You’re back in for a “fix-it” visit from a previous mistake the stylist made
    • Another stylist or manager had to fix a big mistake your stylist made (in this case, you should tip the other stylist)

    Flat Rate Tips

    Tips don’t always have to be a figured-up percentage of the total cost of the service. Some customers find it easier to leave a flat rate dollar amount tip each time. It’s easier than figuring up a tip percentage each time and often results in a higher-than-average tip. 

    This is especially useful if you’re paying in cash. Just make sure you’re leaving a tip that equals at least 15% of the total. 

    Hairdresser Tipping Examples

    Hair salon tipping examples graphic

    You don’t always know exactly how much you should tip your hairdresser. Here are a few scenarios where you might be unsure of your tip amount. 

    Example 1: Good Stylist, Unsatisfactory Results

    You really like your stylist, and they always do a good job. But today, something went wrong and your hair is not quite looking like you’d imagined. What should you do? 

    Let your stylist know how you feel. One of the perks of having a regular hairdresser is developing honest and open communication.

    If you don’t like something new they tried, or if they made a mistake, tell them. If it’s something they can fix for you, they’ll want to ensure you leave satisfied. 

    You should still leave a 15% tip, or the amount you usually do. Everyone has an off day and makes mistakes – don’t let a one-off unsatisfactory experience mess up your relationship with a good stylist.  

    Example 2: New Hairdresser and You’ll Come Back Often

    If you’re visiting a new stylist and they really nail what you asked for, you’re probably feeling very appreciative. You’d like to leave a good tip, but plan on coming back often and don’t want to set the bar too high.

    How much should you tip them? Finding a new stylist who “gets it” is such a wonderful experience. Finally, a place you can go and feel comfortable knowing they’ll bring your ideas to life as you envisioned them!

    There’s a lot to be said for getting off on the right foot with a new stylist by leaving a good tip. But if you’re planning on coming in regularly after this visit, you may not want to leave such a large tip that your future tips seem cheap by comparison.

    You can leave a 20% tip in this situation. Even if it brings the total a little higher than you planned for, the convenience and benefits of having a great stylist will far outweigh the cost.

    After your initial visit, you can move to 15% tips, especially if you’ll be visiting regularly. Stylists understand that you’re spending more by coming in often and don’t expect big tips every time.

    Example 3: Bad Results and They Can’t or Won’t Fix It

    You visit a new salon or stylist and they’ve messed up your hair in a way that can’t be ignored. Maybe they cut too much off, dyed it the wrong shade, or gave you a style that’s wildly different from what you requested.

    You let them know it’s a problem that needs to be fixed, but they either can’t fix it or refuse to. How do you handle the tip in this scenario? It really depends on the attitude of the hairdresser here.

    If your stylist made an honest mistake and is apologetic about it, but there’s nothing they can do to fix it right away, be lenient.You can always withhold the tip.

    But if you’re not truly upset, you should leave at least 10%. Mistakes do happen. If you have a stylist who apologizes for the problem and does what they can to make it right, it’s worth leaving a tip. 

    If your stylist “doesn’t see the problem,” gets upset when you point it out, wants to charge you more to fix it, or just refuses to do anything to make it right, you don’t have to leave a tip.

    Salons are social, customer-centric businesses and stylists rely on tips to indicate how satisfied their clients are. Maybe you’re dealing with a hairdresser who doesn’t care about your dissatisfaction.

    In this case, they’ve already broken the salon etiquette. So you should feel obligation to leave a tip. But, as we said before, these instances are rare.

    So, How Much Should You Tip at a Hair Salon?

    Rule of thumb explaining how much to tip hairdresser

    So, how much should you tip a hair stylist? Well, that really depends on the service you got. To recap:

    • Poor Service: 10% tip
    • Average Service: 15% tip
    • Amazing Service: 20 % tip

    Remember: Stylists are doing a service for you, and it’s important to them that you leave satisfied. After all, once you’re out of the salon, your mane becomes a mobile billboard for their business.

     If the stylist did a good job, you should tip at least 15%. 20% is always appreciated, and even more than that will make their week. Always try to give your stylist the benefit of the doubt, and they’ll be sure to return the favor down the road.

    Click for Frequently Asked Questions

    When tipping a hairdresser, the general rule of thumb is to tip 10 to 20 percent. So if your hairdresser did a great job on your hair color, you could give them a tip. If they didn’t do as well as you would have liked, you could give them .

    In general, there’s no fixed price for a hairdresser’s tips. The easiest thing you can do is set your own price based on the service the hairdresser provides. For a service that costs 0, you could leave a to (15% to 20%) tip, depending on how satisfied you were with the service.

    If you tip 20%, you will leave a tip. If you tipped 15%, you would leave an .75 tip, or you could round it up to or .

    In general, you should tip 15% to 20% of the entire bill. So if your service costs , you will tip .75 to .

    There are many ways to tip a hairdresser, but most prefer to get tips in cash. Other options include writing a personal check, using Venmo or Paypal, placing the tip in an envelope, or leaving it with the person at the front desk so the hairdresser can pick it up after you leave. It’s also fine to ask the hairdresser how they prefer to receive their tips.

    While You’re Here…
    How Much to Tip Your Hairdresser for Proper Salon Etiquette
  • How much do you Tip Your barber or hair stylist?

    Other Important Barbershop EtiquetteArrive to Your Appointment on Time. It is simply good manners to arrive for your haircut at the time to which you agreed. ...Come With Clean Hair. Be sure to come to your appointment with clean hair. ...Stay Off Your Phone. ...Know What Style You Want. ...Tell Your Barber Your Concerns. ...
    How Much Should You Tip a Barber? (Barbershop Etiquette)
  • How much should I tip for a haircut?

    Gone are the days when tipping 10 percent was the norm. To answer 'how much do you tip for a haircut' you should tip between .25 and on a haircut, depending on how good your haircut was and how much tip you'd like to leave. .25 is a 15% tip and is a 20% tip.
    How Much Do You Tip for a Haircut - Answered!
  • How much are you suppose to tip the hairstylist?

    When it comes to tipping your hairstylist, always go with the golden rule of 20 percent, says Daniel Post, spokesperson for the Emily Post Institute. "Remember that just like servers in restaurants, hairdressers depend on tips as part of their income," he says.

    This might sound familiar: You hit the hair salon for a color, cut, and blow-out, you're looking gorgeous and feeling fierce—and then you get to the check-out desk and freeze. Suddenly you realize you have no idea whom to tip—not to mention how much to tip everyone. You might already know conventional tipping etiquette requires you tip your hairstylist, but what about the person who washed your hair or dried it for you while your stylist cut someone else's hair? And what if you used a discount offer—how much do you tip then? So many questions. Here’s everything you need to know about how to tip a hairdresser—and everyone else who helped you at the salon.

    When it comes to tipping your hairstylist, always go with the golden rule of 20 percent, says Daniel Post, spokesperson for the Emily Post Institute. "Remember that just like servers in restaurants, hairdressers depend on tips as part of their income," he says. The only time this isn't true is during the holiday season: Tip your hairdresser a little extra around the holidays (an additional 10 percent should do it) as a generous bonus.

    Many salons don't allow you to leave a tip on a credit card, so be sure to bring enough cash with you when you arrive at your appointment. "Our society is slowly becoming cashless, but in the world of tipping, cash is king,” says Sharon Schweitzer, international etiquette expert and the founder of Protocol & Etiquette Worldwide.

    Most salons also have their own websites with a list of services and prices, or at least price ranges (sometimes service rates vary by who's cutting your hair—the salon owner, a senior stylist?—and how long, coarse, or thick your hair is). Look up prices before you go to gauge how much cash you might need to have on hand.

    While tipping your hairdresser is definitely considered proper etiquette, you should also feel good about giving gratuity. "Remember that the word ‘gratuity’ comes from 'gratitude,'" says Post. "Think of tipping less as an obligation and more of a way of being thankful for someone who is pampering you and making you look and feel your best."

    Plus, being a reliable tipper often pays off in other ways. "When you tip well, your generosity will be remembered the next time you come back," says Post, who points out that your hairstylist might offer you perks such as free bang trims or touch-ups.

    How much should you tip your colorist or the person who washed your hair (and gave you that unexpectedly amazing scalp massage)? Remember the golden rule: “You should tip 20 percent on the entire service cost, not per individual,” says Schweitzer.

    So if your haircut and blow-dry cost total, and your color was , your total service cost comes to 0. That means you should tip divided between the colorist and stylist. That said, if an assistant blow-dried or shampooed your hair, you should give them - since they're likely getting paid minimum wage and really rely on tips.

    Post recommends simply asking the person ringing you up at the front desk to help you calculate tips and distribute them to the correct people. "When you have three separate people helping you, it can be confusing to monitor their names and what they should be tipped, so defer to the front desk or manager to help you distribute your tips or explain the system this particular salon uses," he says. Ask if small envelopes are available for individual tip distribution. "Tipping is something that, when done discreetly, is classy. You shouldn’t be searching the salon for three or four different people making a show of your gratuity,” he says.

    If you’re using a coupon or bought your service from a discount site like Groupon, ask the person at the front desk to tell you the true cost of the service you received. "Tip 20 percent on the true total cost of the service, not the discounted cost," Schweitzer says. "The hairdresser did the same amount of work, so they deserve the same amount of tip."

    Post says that most small business owners don’t expect a tip, and if the owner is present in the salon, but didn't work on your hair, there's no reason to tip.

    But if they worked on your hair they'd still appreciate it. If you’re not sure, speak up. Just ask, "I know this is your place—do you accept tips?" The salon owner might gladly take it, turn it down, or go on to share it with their stylists, so always err on the courteous side and offer the standard 20 percent.

    The only time you shouldn’t tip: When you buy product. "If you decide to buy some styling products or some shampoo, don’t let the receptionist add that to your final bill," says Schweitzer, who points out that salon products are pricey and can really drive the price of your bill up. Instead, ask for her to ring them up as a separate transaction so that there is no confusion when it comes to gratuity for your services.

    Otherwise, even if your service wasn't the best, always tip something. "Use the standard 20 percent as a mental marker and you can go up or down from there," says Post, who says you can tip less if your experience wasn't quite how you expected it to be, or more for a phenomenal experience.

    • By Cari Wira Dineen
    • By Maggie Seaver
    How Much to Tip Your Hairdresser for Proper Salon Etiquette
Hair salon etiquette: How much should you tip your ...

Stylists in some small-town beauty shops, however, report 15% as the norm. Those who work in mall or drop-in hair salons, and are less likely to have a …

Not sure how much to tip your hairstylist? You're not alone. After all, the relationships you form in a salon can be the most intimate in your life. Who else but your hairdresser can examine your gray or damaged hair with such practical indifference? As for bikini waxing, she may not be your friend, but she is your ... bikini waxer. It doesn't get much closer than that.

We asked Tahnee Seiler, student services coach at the Aveda Institute, and Elie Camoro, a top stylist at Frederic Fekkai, to tell us the right way to tip. They also share some customers' faux pas.

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How to find the best haircut for your face shape

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What customers do: In Aveda's informal poll, the lowest tip was 10% and the highest was 25%, but most women said they stick to 20. In and around big cities, the percentage was more generous, even though the services cost more. Women with super short hair, which they get cut and colored every four to six weeks, don't always give a huge tip because their annual beauty bill is so high to begin with. Stylists in some small-town beauty shops, however, report 15% as the norm. Those who work in mall or drop-in hair salons, and are less likely to have a loyal clientele, sometimes get tips of even less.

What salon staff wants you to do: Start from 20% to be fair. Young mothers up the ante if their preschoolers are in on the haircut. If you arrive late or have a toddler with you, you should increase your tip. Other reasons to tip more: if the salon squeezes you in at the last moment, your styling includes a shoulder massage or your manicure includes a hand massage. The bottom line: If you like your hairstylist, tip at least 20%. It helps build relations with the salon and is especially helpful in procuring a last-minute appointment.

Says Camoro: "You want to get the best personal care, and build up a rapport. You don't want to fall into the other category at a big-scale salon, where every service is by appointment only. You want to be one of those clients who can call on a whim when you're flying out of town and ask if we can fit you in."

What customers do: It's confusing. Many give a 20% tip and figure that the stylist will share it with the shampoo washer. Several women compared it to eating out at a fancy restaurant with both a wine steward and a waiter, where they give just one tip and assume the restaurant divides it.

What salon staff wants you to do: Forget the restaurant idea. Tip everyone separately. In big salons, give at least to to the hair washer. The more the shampooer does (such as apply toner or other special products), the more you should give. But in smaller towns, like Brewer, Maine, a tip for a shampoo would seem excessive, since the price for a shampoo, conditioning, cut and blow-dry at Defining Design is , and stylist Roxie Boudreau does it all herself.

Should you tip the shampooer separately? Digital Vision/Rayman/Getty Images

What customers do: The commonly held belief is that you shouldn't tip the salon owner if she or he does your hair. But more and more customers do.

What salon staff wants you to do: That rule really doesn't apply anymore. Go ahead, tip the owner.

What customers do: In the age of smartphones, customers do too much in the stylist's chair. But they may not know how much it bothers the stylists.

What salon staff wants you to do: Be on time. Don't cancel within 24 hours of your appointment. Don't show up so sick that you are coughing throughout the haircut. And don't sit glued to your cell phones and tablets. Your body has to be in the right position for a good haircut. Sit up and face forward and no hunching over a keypad or magazine.

What if you feel like just zoning out and not talking? No problem, stylists say. They understand that some people just want to chill and get pampered. And if you snooze during the hair-coloring process, so be it.

What customers do: When they're attached to a stylist, customers give both money and gifts at the holidays. Presents can be handmade items, like a craft or cookies. Store-bought items are acceptable, too.

What salon staff wants you to do: Stylists appreciate the thanks and recognition during the holidays. Even a card works. "Write a note on it, and don't forget to put your name. We always read them," says Camoro.

This story was originally published Jan. 1, 2013.

How Much to Tip Your Hairdresser for Proper Salon Etiquette

How Much to Tip for a Haircut? The general rule of thumb is to give 15-20 percent gratuity to your hair stylist or barber. Say, if your haircut costs , it’s recommended to tip around . Related Post: How to Get a Perfect Haircut. How …

Undoubtedly, having your hair done is so much more than just a new haircut or a fresh set of highlights – these are a few hours of pure, unrefined indulgence. We all once need to sit back, have a cup of good coffee and a relaxing head massage, and enjoy that delightful feeling of being listened to and looked after.

When you are being pampered and given more than just a hair service, inevitably, you want to give back more in return. However, while tipping is a nice way to show your gratitude and appreciation to your stylist, it can often seem awkward and uneasy. The main reason for it is a lack of transparency about how much to tip the hairdresser and who else you need to tip. To bring in some clarity, we have compiled main salon tipping etiquette guidelines for you.

Should I Tip My Hairdresser?

Think about gratuity as a gesture of good will rather than obligation. Whilst salon etiquette suggests tipping your hairdresser, it certainly is a matter of your personal preference. We’d like to reassure you that no one is expecting you to pay any extras if you don’t feel like it.

Are you still puzzled and not sure what to do? Here’s a quick checklist to help you:

  • Are you genuinely pleased with your new hair?
  • Have you had any special services, not included in your bill, e.g., a longer head massage or a special hair treatment?
  • Did the hairdresser had to squeeze you in for a last-minute appointment? Was it extra early or late?
  • Was your hair stylist nice to you and do you like them as a person?

If you answered positively to one or more of those questions, probably the right answer is “yes” – it would be nice to tip your hairdresser. At the end of the day, the whole idea of tips is about expressing your recognition of the excellent work of your hair stylist and building a relationship with them.

Hairdresser Blow Drying Client’s Hair

Freepik / @senivpetro

How Much to Tip for a Haircut?

The general rule of thumb is to give 15-20 percent gratuity to your hair stylist or barber. Say, if your haircut costs , it’s recommended to tip around .

Related Post: How to Get a Perfect Haircut

How Much to Tip for Hair Color?

The same 20 percent standard tip applies to hair color services. However, if you spent long hours in the salon and your hand-painted balayage or a set of immaculately seamless highlights look like a piece of art, you may be willing to increase your tip amount.

This particularly applies to the situations where your hairdresser needs to deal with some challenges like a box color that has gone wrong, three-inch roots or an overgrown haircut.

Who Should You Tip?

It is standard practice to tip separately for cutting and coloring services if those were provided by different stylists; however, giving some gratuity to the assistant is highly recommended, too. Often, they take on such important responsibilities as applying your toner and rinsing it all out just on time and blow-drying your hair, not to mention the head massage, which for many of us is the favorite part of the whole appointment. Therefore, passing a few dollars is a nice way to reward someone who looks after your hair.

Washing Hair at Hair Salon

Freepik / @diana-grytsku

Should You Tip if You Are not Happy with Your Haircut or Color?

The short answer is no, you don’t have to. Although gratuity is a deeply ingrained social norm, hairdressers won’t expect to be tipped when the service didn’t work out quite as great as expected. Also, you don’t have to tip for the correction of the service that initially went wrong (unless you go to a different stylist).

Average Wedding Hair Tip

Tip just as you normally would in a hair salon. Still, consider adding some extra if there happen any tricky situations that can make your hair stylist feel under pressure: like if you are running late or any of your bridesmaids is being extremely particular about their hair.

Elegant Wedding Hairstyle for Lond Blonde Hair

Freepik / @bristekjegor

Do You Tip for a Bang Trim?

Even though it is a quick, often free, service, it still requires time and effort from your hairdresser to do it right (just imagine your fringe cut too short or uneven!) or gratuity would be sufficient to show your gratitude for the favor.

Do You Tip the Owner of a Hair Salon?

This is a controversial question – as well as whether you should tip a mobile hairdresser or the stylist who is renting a chair in a salon and doesn’t have to split the money with their employer.

Let’s look at it from the perspective of why you actually want to tip. Would you do it only because you think they don’t make enough money, or would you like to praise your hairdresser for that extra mile, to bond with them and show them how happy you are with your new hairstyle?

We believe that it doesn’t matter if your hair stylist owns the salon; they still deserve to be tipped for their hard work.

When Is a Holiday Tip Appropriate?

We all know that around the Christmas season hair stylists are working their fingers to the bone to fit everyone in, so it is appropriate to reward them with some extra gratuity. On the other hand, holiday time involves a lot of spending, so if it’s difficult for you, just stick with your regular tip.

Stylist Creating a Hairstyle for Special Occasion

Freepik / @cookie-studio

Other Ways to be Grateful

Don’t worry if you are experiencing financially tough times – there are some alternative ways to pay back and show that you care about your hair stylist. Leaving them a banging review on social media is worth gold and will be highly appreciated. Also, little presents like a hand-written card for Christmas, or a small but thoughtful present won’t cost a fortune but will make your hairdresser feel special.

Featured Image via Freepik / @Racool_studio

How Much to Tip Hairdressers and Stylists

Exactly How Much to Tip Your Hairdresser When it comes to tipping your hairstylist, always go with the golden rule of 20 percent, says Daniel Post, spokesperson for the Emily Post Institute . "Remember that just like servers in restaurants, hairdressers depend on …

This might sound familiar: You hit the hair salon for a color, cut, and blow-out, you're looking gorgeous and feeling fierce—and then you get to the check-out desk and freeze. Suddenly you realize you have no idea whom to tip—not to mention how much to tip everyone. You might already know conventional tipping etiquette requires you tip your hairstylist, but what about the person who washed your hair or dried it for you while your stylist cut someone else's hair? And what if you used a discount offer—how much do you tip then? So many questions. Here’s everything you need to know about how to tip a hairdresser—and everyone else who helped you at the salon.

When it comes to tipping your hairstylist, always go with the golden rule of 20 percent, says Daniel Post, spokesperson for the Emily Post Institute. "Remember that just like servers in restaurants, hairdressers depend on tips as part of their income," he says. The only time this isn't true is during the holiday season: Tip your hairdresser a little extra around the holidays (an additional 10 percent should do it) as a generous bonus.

Many salons don't allow you to leave a tip on a credit card, so be sure to bring enough cash with you when you arrive at your appointment. "Our society is slowly becoming cashless, but in the world of tipping, cash is king,” says Sharon Schweitzer, international etiquette expert and the founder of Protocol & Etiquette Worldwide.

Most salons also have their own websites with a list of services and prices, or at least price ranges (sometimes service rates vary by who's cutting your hair—the salon owner, a senior stylist?—and how long, coarse, or thick your hair is). Look up prices before you go to gauge how much cash you might need to have on hand.

While tipping your hairdresser is definitely considered proper etiquette, you should also feel good about giving gratuity. "Remember that the word ‘gratuity’ comes from 'gratitude,'" says Post. "Think of tipping less as an obligation and more of a way of being thankful for someone who is pampering you and making you look and feel your best."

Plus, being a reliable tipper often pays off in other ways. "When you tip well, your generosity will be remembered the next time you come back," says Post, who points out that your hairstylist might offer you perks such as free bang trims or touch-ups.

How much should you tip your colorist or the person who washed your hair (and gave you that unexpectedly amazing scalp massage)? Remember the golden rule: “You should tip 20 percent on the entire service cost, not per individual,” says Schweitzer.

So if your haircut and blow-dry cost total, and your color was , your total service cost comes to 0. That means you should tip divided between the colorist and stylist. That said, if an assistant blow-dried or shampooed your hair, you should give them - since they're likely getting paid minimum wage and really rely on tips.

Post recommends simply asking the person ringing you up at the front desk to help you calculate tips and distribute them to the correct people. "When you have three separate people helping you, it can be confusing to monitor their names and what they should be tipped, so defer to the front desk or manager to help you distribute your tips or explain the system this particular salon uses," he says. Ask if small envelopes are available for individual tip distribution. "Tipping is something that, when done discreetly, is classy. You shouldn’t be searching the salon for three or four different people making a show of your gratuity,” he says.

If you’re using a coupon or bought your service from a discount site like Groupon, ask the person at the front desk to tell you the true cost of the service you received. "Tip 20 percent on the true total cost of the service, not the discounted cost," Schweitzer says. "The hairdresser did the same amount of work, so they deserve the same amount of tip."

Post says that most small business owners don’t expect a tip, and if the owner is present in the salon, but didn't work on your hair, there's no reason to tip.

But if they worked on your hair they'd still appreciate it. If you’re not sure, speak up. Just ask, "I know this is your place—do you accept tips?" The salon owner might gladly take it, turn it down, or go on to share it with their stylists, so always err on the courteous side and offer the standard 20 percent.

The only time you shouldn’t tip: When you buy product. "If you decide to buy some styling products or some shampoo, don’t let the receptionist add that to your final bill," says Schweitzer, who points out that salon products are pricey and can really drive the price of your bill up. Instead, ask for her to ring them up as a separate transaction so that there is no confusion when it comes to gratuity for your services.

Otherwise, even if your service wasn't the best, always tip something. "Use the standard 20 percent as a mental marker and you can go up or down from there," says Post, who says you can tip less if your experience wasn't quite how you expected it to be, or more for a phenomenal experience.

  • By Cari Wira Dineen
  • By Maggie Seaver
How Much to Tip Your Hairdresser (with Calculator)

16-10-0000 · Should you tip the hairdresser assistant? You should compensate the hairdresser assistant for their labor and service. If the assistant is only washing your hair, you can tip

- , and if they're brushing out your hair and drying it, then - is a good amount.

16-10-0000

You probably already know you should tip your hairdresser - but how much? Keep reading for the proper hair salon etiquette.

A bad haircut can ruin your confidence and take weeks to grow out. That's why finding your perfect hairdresser is important. When you find someone you connect with, you always go back.

But if you're not sure how much to tip your hairstylist, you're not alone. The amount you tip can vary depending on the service.

Find out just how much you should tip with this handy guide.

How much should you tip your hairdresser?

Most people tip 20% at the hair salon. At the lowest end, some people tip 10%. Some folks are more generous and tip 25% - 30%.

Calculate How Much to Tip Hairdresser

You want to tip more if the stylist squeezes you in at the last minute or you need to bring your children into the salon. Basically, any reason that may require more work from the salon staff than a typical haircut.

People who have short hair or require regular color touch-ups typically tip less (like 15%) because their beauty bill is already so high.

But if you want to play it safe, a 20% tip is a good baseline for your next hair appointment.

What does Reddit say?
Users on Reddit recommend tipping 20% - 30% for the cost of your cut. This is especially important if your stylist is good and you want to build a customer relationship with them.

Folks on r/Frugal suggest tipping 15% - 20% for basic, simple haircuts that do not require coloring or styling.

How much do you tip for a 0 hair color?

You should tip 18% - 22% for good service and 25% for excellent service. A quality hair coloring requires a lot of skill and your hairdresser should feel appreciated for their hard work.

How much should you tip on a 0 hair service?

You should start at a 20% tip as a fair baseline. And if the service and the result are exceptional, you should tip 25%.

How much do you tip a hairdresser at Christmas? An additional holiday 'bonus' of - is a good way to thank your stylist for all their work throughout the year. If you've been going to them for a long time, you can even tip a little more as a more personal 'thank you'.

Hairdresser tipping cheat sheet

Here's a quick primer on what you should tip for haircuts, depending on the cost:

Haircut price

  • haircut - tip
  • 0 haircut - tip
  • 0 haircut - tip
  • 0 haircut - tip
  • 0 haircut - tip
  • 0 haircut - tip
  • 0 haircut - tip
  • 0 haircut - 0 tip

Should you tip the hairdresser assistant?

You should compensate the hairdresser assistant for their labor and service. If the assistant is only washing your hair, you can tip

- , and if they're brushing out your hair and drying it, then - is a good amount.

Bottom line

Graduation? You go to your hairstylist for the perfect bouncy curls on your big day. Bad breakup? You bring a photo of a pixie cut or edgy bob to introduce a change in your life. Maid of honor? They make sure you look good and fit the bride's wedding theme.

It's only appropriate to tip them for their expertise, skillset, and personalized service. Start at 20% as a baseline and if the service is really excellent, up to 30%.

Amber Kong is a content and creative at CreditDonkey, a personal finance comparison and reviews website. Write to Amber Kong at [email protected] Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for our latest posts.

groupon.com

How much should you tip your hairstylist if they own the salon? Wait, do you tip the owner of a hair salon? There used to be a somewhat widespread belief that you shouldn't tip the owner, but that is "kind of old-school," Jason says. Nowadays, most people tip them the same amount they would tip a nonowner-stylist. Should you tip the salon assistant separately? A salon assistant might shampoo ...

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Do you have tipping anxiety? After spending several hours in the salon, you may find that you and your new do are wondering what the appropriate tip percentage is. Although 20% is the recommended amount, that number could fluctuate. To prevent any awkwardness, we had Chicago's Red 7 Salon co-owner Jason Hall explain basic hair salon etiquette.

First things first, how much should you tip your hairstylist?

Short answer: It depends! If you’re getting your hair done by someone new, tipping between 15%-20% is considered the norm. However, if you’ve been consistently seeing your hairstylist for longer and have even developed a personal relationship, anywhere between 20%-30% would be an appropriate thank you for their hard work!

How much should you tip your hairstylist if they own the salon? Wait, do you tip the owner of a hair salon?

There used to be a somewhat widespread belief that you shouldn't tip the owner, but that is "kind of old-school," Jason says. Nowadays, most people tip them the same amount they would tip a nonowner-stylist.

Should you tip the salon assistant separately?

A salon assistant might shampoo your hair, help your colorist, or perform other treatment-related tasks, so it makes sense to tip them. However, many people don't because they assume that their stylist "tips out," i.e., gives a portion of their tips to assistants. That's not necessarily the case, which is why Jason recommends asking your stylist if they do tip out, then increasing your gratuity from 20% to 22% or 23% if they say yes. If they say no, be sure to throw a couple bucks the assistant's way. Jason says that while tipping them around is polite, you can always tip more if they're exceptionally attentive.

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Is it rude to answer a phone call? What about texting?

Unless the call absolutely can't wait, don't pick up or make a phone call at the salon. It's hard for the stylist to cut or color your hair when they have to avoid your phone or earbuds. Jason has personally seen some clients conduct business calls during their shampoo, but he thinks "it's disrespectful" to the stylist, who has to try to keep the water and suds away from the phone. And while some texting is fine, don't sit there scrolling through Instagram the whole time. Your body has to be in the right position for a good haircut, which means sitting up straight and facing forward, not crouched over a screen, or a magazine for that matter.

Do I have to make small talk?

It may seem like small talk is the only option when you can't text or read, but there's no pressure to chat if you'd rather just zone out. Still, small talk isn't just meant for passing the time—it also helps the stylist to get to know you. "Over time, it will help to dictate [the client's] look," Jason says. For example, if a client mentions time-consuming job responsibilities, the stylist may double-check to make sure they still want a high-maintenance 'do. Just don't try to shout over the blow dryer.

Is it OK to go in with dirty hair?

Jason calls unwashed hair "lived in", rather than dirty. In most cases, he says, stylists prefer that you don't wash your hair the morning of your appointment. Freshly washed hair won't hold color foils as well as lived-in locks. If you're getting an updo, it's a little different. Some stylists prefer unwashed hair because the natural oils can give the hair some texture and grip. Others prefer clean hair because they can use styling products to add texture. Err on the side of mostly clean and follow Jason's suggestion: shampoo the night before an appointment to have at least a little bit of grip to your hair that can be enhanced with texturizer or dry shampoo if necessary.

Drop a quarter into your own tip jar if you can french-braid your hair in 90 seconds.

What do you do if you're running late?

Contact the salon. If you're going to be more than 15 minutes late, call and see if they still have time to take you. A lot of salons will book back-to-back clients for a popular stylist, and if you're more than 15 minutes late, you start cutting into another person's time. A lot of stylists will still try to accommodate their regulars, but it's up to them to decide how to do that at that point.

Is there anything else my stylist wants me to know?

Instead of describing what you want, show the stylist a visual aid. "A picture is great because it gives a shortcut to breaking down what the client is looking for," Jason says. Sometimes, though, clients can get caught up in a fad and don't consider how it will work for them. "Remember when Charlize Theron had the really short blond pixie? We had clients who brought in pictures of that, but those clients did not look like her. She has very predominant cheekbones; she has very fine- to medium-texture [hair]. Maybe the client's face shape is more round and the hair texture is more thick." If you do bring in a picture, it's best to manage your expectations and view it as a flexible template, not a must-have goal.

Need some ideas to bring to your stylist? Show them one of these seven common haircuts for women or talk to them about going gray on purpose.

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Hairdresser Tip Calculator

How Much Should You Tip Your Hairdresser? If you’re happy with your hairdresser’s service, you should tip them between15 to 20 percent of the total amount of the haircut. Tipping your hairdresser is considered a common courtesy and makes up a large portion of their income.

Hairdresser Tip Calculator

Are you having your hair done by a hairdresser? Do you need to figure out how much you should tip? That’s where we come in with our easy-to-use hairdresser tip calculator. Just enter how much the hairdresser is charging you along with the tip percentage you’d like to leave. We’ll do the rest. Tipping made simple!

For our hairdresser tip calculator, we’ve used Square’s average costs and tip percentage for a woman’s haircut at a salon. Square says the average woman’s haircut costs and a 20% tip is left. If you had coloring, highlights, extensions, etc that will add to the cost so just put in what you’ve paid. A tip of 15 to 20% is considered appropriate if you’re happy with the job your hairdresser’s done.

How Much Should You Tip Your Hairdresser?

If you’re happy with your hairdresser’s service, you should tip them between15 to 20 percent of the total amount of the haircut. Tipping your hairdresser is considered a common courtesy and makes up a large portion of their income. Of course, feel free to tip for amazing service or not at all if you aren’t happy with the results. Gone are the days when tipping 10 percent was the norm in the service industry.

What’s The Average Cost of a Woman’s Haircut?

According to Square, the people behind the white swivel credit card machine, the average price of a woman’s haircut is . Behind that average, though, are places where haircuts cost much more or less. It just depends on your location. The cost of coloring, highlights, extensions and blowouts varies just as much and can add a lot to the cost of just a basic haircut.

How Much Is The Average Hairdresser Actually Tipped?

According to Square, hairdressers receive an average tip percentage of 20%. Remember that Square also reported that the average woman’s haircut cost ? That means that the average hairdresser tip amount is .

How Much To Tip Hairdresser on 0?

If your hairdresser charges you 0, you should tip to . A tip of is a 15% tip while is a 20% tip. According to Square, the average tip for a hairdresser is 20% so if you want to tip the average amount, you’ll need to leave . Your hairdresser will appreciate your generosity.

How Much to Tip at the Hair Salon: Your Ultimate Guide ...

22-05-2018 · Tipping Made Easy. If you’re unsure on exactly how to show your stylist how much you value them, we asked our panel to break it down to the basics. The usual gratuity for your stylist or ...

22-05-2018

In some cases, stylists can also make money by convincing clients to buy a product that was used on them during their service. However, this represents a minuscule amount of revenue says Shira Devash Espinoza, a freelance stylist based in New Jersey. “When working in a salon, you’re constantly pushed and ‘rewarded’ to sell, but only earn maybe 10 percent of it if you’re lucky,” she says.

How They Spend It

So what happens to Krzyminski’s hypothetical 0? The majority of it, she says, goes toward licensing fees, personal supplies, and tools (blow-dryers, flatirons, curling irons), and continuing education classes. That means even on a jam-packed day, a stylist may only make enough take home pay to cover the essentials of food, shelter, and clothing.

Tips, on the other hand, help pay for the supplemental benefits that those not in the service industry take for granted. Says Stephanie Brown, a colorist at Manhattan’s Nunzio Saviano Salon, “It’s a physically demanding job, and most salons are too small to provide health benefits or paid vacations and sick days.”

Ladda Phommavong, a stylist at Third Space Salon in Austin, Texas, says that those gratuities are what helped her become the in-demand stylist she is today. “The tips I received from clients meant being able to take outside courses to hone my craft,” she says. “If clients knew I was saving up to take the master colorist course and that their tipping was directly contributing to me becoming a better stylist for them, I think they would definitely want to be a part of that.”

Freelance Isn’t Free

Many stylists choose to forgo the commission-based life and instead strike out on their own by renting booths in salons. This basically means paying a weekly or monthly fee—our stylist sources said they generally pay around 0 a week or 0 a month, depending on where they are based—to reserve a semipermanent spot to see clients. In these cases, stylists keep 100 percent of their service fee as well as their tips. The downside? “We pay for absolutely everything—refreshments, cups, capes, color bowls, foils, brushes, scissors, styling products,” says Jennifer Riney of Brushed Salon in Oklahoma City. They are also on the hook for paying liability insurance and credit card fees.

Freelancers like Sarah Finn, who rents a chair at The Ritz Day Spa & Salon in Watertown, New York, say that one big perk of being on their own is an uptick in tips. “I've worked at salons where my clients paid at a cash register and their tips went through many hands," says Finn. "I don’t know if it's just because they're paying me face-to-face or if tips went missing at other places, but I definitely make more as a booth renter.”

Another option for freelancers is the coworking salon. Arturo Swayze, the founder and CEO of ManeSpace in NYC, is a pioneer of this relatively new setup. He provides short-term rentals for stylists who don’t need or want a regular stint in a salon. Stylists reserve a time slot, use an app to unlock the space, and see their clientele as needed. But even in this scenario, says Swayze, there is still uncertainty.

quora.com

Answer (1 of 4): I think you should tip what you can afford to tip. You should never feel any pressure on you to tip. If your hairdresser is charging 0 dollars for highlights, believe me honey she is raking in the money. She is probably getting 90% of that money. Do your best and do not feel ...

Do you tip hair stylist that comes to your house?

DIS Veteran. Joined. Apr 4, 2005. Apr 3, 2018. #7. gotomu212 said: Since it’s customary not to tip the owner of a business I don’t think I’d tip her for a home visit she’s doing on the side- especially if you’re having to provide all the supplies. (Are you saying with her fee plus supplies it’s 0 or just her fee is 0? If it ...

Stylist does work in a salon but does work on the side. DD is having her dye her hair at our house. I think my daughter is paying for the supplies and with her fee it is 0. We are not sure we tip her too. How much?

DisneyHardin

When the guy I go to was between salons, he came to my house once. I tipped him, but he did provide the supplies.

Poohforyou

I'd definitely tip her. Is she charging less because she won't have to share anything with her salon? I would tip whatever percentage is normal at the salon.

shoney

I would tip the same. 20%.

Since it’s customary not to tip the owner of a business I don’t think I’d tip her for a home visit she’s doing on the side- especially if you’re having to provide all the supplies.

(Are you saying with her fee plus supplies it’s 0 or just her fee is 0? If it’s just her fee that seems high to me since the supplies aren’t cheap for a one time dye.)

gillep

I would tip my usual 20%.

shoney

Since it’s customary not to tip the owner of a business I don’t think I’d tip her for a home visit she’s doing on the side- especially if you’re having to provide all the supplies.

(Are you saying with her fee plus supplies it’s 0 or just her fee is 0? If it’s just her fee that seems high to me since the supplies aren’t cheap for a one time dye.)

I have never seen dont tip the owner in practice. Every one I know tips the owner of salons.

Marchand63

Since it’s customary not to tip the owner of a business I don’t think I’d tip her for a home visit she’s doing on the side- especially if you’re having to provide all the supplies.

(Are you saying with her fee plus supplies it’s 0 or just her fee is 0? If it’s just her fee that seems high to me since the supplies aren’t cheap for a one time dye.)

The fee of 0 is for the supplies and the work to dye daughters hair.

jiminyC_fan

I tip my waxer who works out of her basement, I’d tip more if she came to me.

It would never occur to me not to tip. I'd tip 20% and be very happy the service was provided at your home.

SharonZ

I would tip at least 20% for someone coming to my home.
How Much To Tip Your Hairdresser: A Quick Reference Guide ...

23-08-2021 · 7 rows  · How Much Should You Tip a Hairdresser? The short answer is 10% to 20%. If their service was ...

23-08-2021
Rear view shot of handsome hairdresser cutting hair of male client.
Jacob Ammentorp Lund / Getty Images/iStockphoto

Since it can take hours upon hours for hairstylists to style, cut and color hair, the expectation is they’ll be compensated appropriately. In 2020, hairstylists earned a median pay of ,630, so tips go a long way.

Tipping is common etiquette, and you should know how much to tip a hairstylist since it will save you awkwardness and calculations while you’re getting your hair done.

This article will outline the basic hairstyling etiquette and tips on how much you should tip your stylist.

Why Should You Tip Hairdressers?

Think of it this way: it’s your hairdressers’ job to cut, style and/or color your hair. If they choose to go out of their way to clean the space for you, make small talk, give you compliments about your hair and offer a complimentary drink, it’s courteous to tip them for their services.

By tipping a service provider, you show them your appreciation and strengthen your relationship with them. However, most people aren’t familiar with the proper tipping rate for hairstylists. If you’re sometimes uncertain what to tip your hairstylist, this guide is for you!

How Much Should You Tip a Hairdresser?

The short answer is 10% to 20%. If their service was reasonable, leave a 10% tip, but if it was above average, make it 15%.

Likewise, if you’re thrilled with the job they did with your hair, leave a 20% tip.

For instance, if your total bill is 0, the tip will be:

  • 10%:
  • 15%:
  • 20%:

percentages showing how much you should tip your hairdresser

If you have your phone with you, it’s pretty easy to calculate the tip. For example, if you want to tip 20%, divide 20 by 100 and multiply it by your total bill. That should give you the amount you need to tip.

Here’s a table to help you out:

Total Bill Bad Services Good Service Excellent Service
.50 .75
.00 .50 .00
0 .00 .00 .00
0 .00 .50 .00
0 .00 .00 .00
0 .00 .50 .00
0 .00 .00 .00

Easy, right?

How Much Should You Tip Your Hairstylist According to Service?

The amount you tip can also depend on the type of service provided to you. Some people may tip 10% to 15% on the total bill, while others may choose to leave no tip at all. However, you should only do that if the service was absolutely terrible. Not tipping is a rude money habit.

It is ultimately up to you how much you want to give your hairdresser as a gratuity, but here’s a rough guide if you’re unsure:

10% Tip

You should leave a 10% tip in the following instances:

  • You were in the salon for a very simple or less time-consuming service.
  • Your hair is short and easy to manage; thus, the hairdresser did not have to spend much time or effort on it.
  • It was a preliminary service, and you will be coming back for a more expensive hair treatment later.
  • You were not satisfied with the quality of service provided and plan on not coming back to the salon.

However, it’s important to note that some hairstylists may not consider 10% an acceptable tip, thinking of it more as an ‘obligation’ on your part rather than an act of gratitude. So be sure to think twice before leaving a  tip.

15% Tip

You should tip your hairstylist 15% if:

  • It’s a regular salon visit from you.
  • You’re at a new salon for the first time.
  • You’re satisfied with the results.
  • You’re not exactly sure about how much to pay, so you split the difference on the common - range.
  • If the service itself was expensive and you don’t want to spend too much, you can leave a 15% tip.

15% is a sweet spot for most hairdressers since it’s not too high and not too low. It’s a way to show your hairstylist that they did a decent job on your hair and you’re happy with the results.

20% Tip

Finally, 20% is an excellent tip for a hairstylist, and you should do so when:

  • You’re over the moon about the quality of service and how your hair looks.
  • You are on good terms with your hairstylist and want to let them know they are appreciated.
  • You want to create a good relationship with the hairdresser because you love their services.
  • You want to tip extra for the holiday season.

20% is higher than what most people tip a hairdresser. However, you may want to tip this much every once in a while if you are on good terms with your regular hairdresser.

More Than 20%

It’s not common for hairdressers to be tipped more than 20%. But, you should tip more if:

  • Your hair is challenging to manage, but the hairstylist did a great job at it.
  • You came in for a difficult hair color or cut.
  • You feel the price for the actual service is less than other salons, and you want to make sure the hairdresser gets their effort’s worth.
  • Your hairstylist spent more time on your hair than they were required to.

How Much Should You Tip Your Hairstylist for Hair Color?

If you go in for hair color, you should tip at least 20%, since the process is time-consuming and your hairdresser would have to put other things on hold to cater to you.

Moreover, if someone other than the hairstylist is shampooing and conditioning your hair, you should tip them somewhere between to .

You should tip more than 20% if:

  • Your hairstylist is also bleaching your strands.
  • If you’ve opted for a difficult hair coloring technique.
  • If your hairstylist is adding highlights.
  • If you’re served a complimentary drink or snack while you wait for the hair color to set it.

Moreover, the tipping percentage can differ according to your location since the salon services are priced differently in each state.

You should opt for tipping a certain percentage rather than sticking to a or flat amount since you might be paying just for a 0 service while the actual 20% tip for it would be .

How Much Do You Tip a Hairdresser?

How much you should tip a hairdresser depends on the service, experience and your budget. But, generally, aim for 20%. That’s for a haircut and for a 0 service.

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Not sure how much to tip your hairstylist? We asked three etiquette experts, two salon professionals and a certified financial planner. Most of these experts suggest leaving 15% to 20%, depending on the service and your satisfaction.

Going with 20% is nice for the stylist and you because that math is pretty simple.

Nerdy tip: To find 20%, start by finding 10%, then double that amount. So, if your haircut costs .00, find 10% by moving the decimal one digit to the left. Ten percent of is . Then double that to arrive at your 20% tip: .

Or, go even simpler and try our tip calculator.

For many hairstylists, tips make up a significant portion of their earnings. That amount “affects the way they think about their income and how they’re going to allocate it for their expenses,” says Steve Waldman, technical artistic director and product consultant for Hair Cuttery Family of Brands.

Tips also show appreciation for your hairdresser, whose job has likely changed and become riskier during the pandemic.

“There’s so much more that has to be done for employees to protect themselves and to protect [customers],” says Crystal L. Bailey, director of The Etiquette Institute of Washington, which is in D.C. “So, if nothing else, we should make sure that we are properly tipping them, considering the grand efforts that they’re going through.”

Sure, 15% to 20% is the general rule (and is also how much to tip a massage therapist.) But if you can afford to tip a little more than 20%, Waldman suggests doing so for styles that are “really intuitive and relying on the creativity and expertise of your stylist.” For example, he says, consider tipping more for hand-painted highlights, corrective coloring and hair extensions.

By contrast, it’s acceptable to tip closer to 15% for simpler styles, like a routine barber cut, Waldman says.

If you're not pleased with how your hair turned out, it’s OK to leave closer to 15%, but do not skip the tip, says Diane Gottsman, founder of The Protocol School of Texas. After all, she says, the professional still put in the time and effort and may not even realize there’s a problem.

Forgoing a tip or silently leaving the salon won’t make your hair look better — but speaking up could. As Waldman puts it: “Give the salon professional an opportunity to get you to a place where you’re happy with your hair.”

Talk privately with your hairstylist about what, specifically, you’re dissatisfied with and ask what could be done differently, suggests Elaine Swann, founder of the Swann School of Protocol, based in Carlsbad, California. “This way, there’s a dialogue, and you’re seeking a resolution.”

Maybe you can schedule a follow-up appointment to adjust the color, for example, or your professional can offer styling tips or products to spruce up an unfortunate cut.

A general rule offered by both Waldman and Gottsman is to tip anyone who touches your hair. So, no need to tip the salon coordinator who checked you into the appointment. But if you can, give about to to the assistant who shampoos your hair or rinses color from it.

» MORE: How much to tip just about everyone

Our experts offered a couple of different views on what to do if you can't afford the tip. Let’s start with the dissenting opinion. While tipping is a “very, very nice gesture,” Swann says, “if you’re not able to leave a tip, then so be it.” In other words, say thank you and leave without tipping.

The cost of the service is all that’s owed, says Swann, who used to own a beauty salon.

Niki Moon, who owns Niki Moon Salon & Spa in Naperville, Illinois, has a similar view. “Tips are always appreciated, but never expected,” she says. “We would never want a client to not come see us because they couldn’t afford to pay the tip on top of their service.”

Gottsman has a different answer. “Gratuity is not optional,” she says. “It’s not a to-go order — they’re cutting your hair.” She points out that you’re choosing to get this experience, which involves tipping. So it would be best if you planned to do so.

Pamela Capalad, a New York-based certified financial planner, is in the same camp. “You can’t just pay what it says on the cash register,” Capalad says. “If you are planning to use these services, you need to add a tip to your budget.”

Before making an appointment, look at the money you have free to spend. For example, if the service you want is 0, do you feel comfortable spending 5 or 0 total to account for a 15% or 20% tip?

“If you are in a financial bind, perhaps you may rethink your experience,” Gottsman says. Maybe you stick with that 0 expense but go to the salon less frequently. Or perhaps you look into a less expensive service or salon. For example, a service plus 20% tip would still keep you in the double digits at .

Or you may try to tweak the way you manage your money. For example, perhaps you find an opportunity to spend less on other expenses to free up money for the salon. Or regularly stash cash in a salon fund to save up for these services.

Whichever way you pay for salon services, aim to tip — and show kindness. For example, use your hairstylist’s name, Gottsman says, and if you’re stoked about your new do, let their manager know or post a glowing online review.

birchbox.com

A: The standard tip for all beauty services is 20 percent —whether it’s a manicure, massage, blowout, or haircut. “One thing that people often forget is that the cost of a …

How Much Should I Tip My Hair Stylist?

13-02-2020 · Hair stylists can do a world of wonder for your hair from color, to cut, to fantastic and fun up-dos. Hair stylists however, can only do so much for clients and the health care of summer hair. Strong, sturdy and beautiful hair looks and feels great but they all have one thing in common; upkeep. Amazingly, an entire head of hair can hold up to 12 tons of weight. Also, healthy hair on average ...

13-02-2020
iStock-638802822-1920w.jpg

Preparing for Esthetician School

By 23 Apr, 2018

Be Proactive – When you’re working with your own clients, you don’t want to find yourself in a situation where you can’t answer a client’s question. Take the initiative to stay on top of your reading, but also go beyond that by staying on top of the latest and most up to date skin trends and techniques. There’s no such thing as having too much knowledge or vocabulary in the esthetician field. It can help to be well versed on various skin care topics even before beginning an esthetician program. Make Sure You Do What You Love – Although this is true of any career choice, it’s especially true when you’re deciding on such a specialized career. Despite there being so many areas of skincare that fall under the Esthetics umbrella, having your certification in Esthetics will be useless if you hate what you’re doing. Build Your Network Early – You probably hear this all the time; network, network, network, but it really pays off! While in Esthetician school, you can work on building your clientele from the beginning. Get to know your clients, follow up with them, and once you establish loyalty, they are more likely to follow you to your salon after graduation. Already graduated? Get started on a portfolio with before and after photos of your clients. You can also branch out to Instagram to build your audience, create and distribute business cards, or even have a website designed for your practice. Be Product Savvy and Honest – Your clients are just like you – they want to be confident in their Esthetician’s recommendations and knowledge, which means you need to be on your A game. Take the time to research any product that you’re recommending or trying to sell. Be prepared to ask any question about the products that you’re recommending. Know Your Worth, And Your Market – Industry standards say that new Estheticians should charge their clients a minimum of

/minute. A 60-minute service, would then be . Another factor to consider is what other Estheticians are charging locally. Depending on your city, you may be able to get away with charging more (or less) for your services. Make sure you keep things fairly priced though, or else you may find it hard to get and retain clients if they feel like they can’t afford your services. You should also consider implementing your own personal terms, hours, and cancelation policy. Time is money, after all. Never Stop Learning – If you’re going to commit to a career in the beauty industry, then you must be comfortable with never really ending the “student” aspect of your career. You should consider learning about related topics such as nutrition for example, since so many skin ailments can be attributed to the food we are putting in our bodies. If you’re going into the medical esthetics field, you may want to consider learning about Botox or laser hair removal. Put Yourself First – Don’t be too busy in your career that you disregard taking care of yourself. Appearance is everything, and your first impression on your clients. You are after all, the face of your brand. You wouldn’t like it if you hired a lawyer and they showed up in a sweat suit, right? You’d think that they were sloppy and unprofessional. Same rule applies here. Strive to put your best foot forward each and every day that you work with your clients. Don’t forget to take time for yourself at the end of the day. Go for a walk, read that book you’ve been meaning to read, exercise, get your water in, etc. If you’re actively taking care of yourself, keeping a professional appearance will be no problem at all. People are coming to you for a relaxing treatment as a special treat to themselves. You don’t want to let personal issues interfere with your money. Interested in a career in Esthetics? Call the professionals at Texas College of Cosmetology today to get started!

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Refresh Your Hair For The Summer!

By Texas College of Cosmetology 20 Mar, 2018

Sunny summertime fun and happy healthy hair, both positive, can be one un-pretty, not so positive combination. Hair stylists can do a world of wonder for your hair from color, to cut, to fantastic and fun up-dos. Hair stylists however, can only do so much for clients and the health care of summer hair. Strong, sturdy and beautiful hair looks and feels great but they all have one thing in common; upkeep. Amazingly, an entire head of hair can hold up to 12 tons of weight. Also, healthy hair on average grows between five to six inches a year. Numbers like these can only be matched with the proper hair care during the summer. Love Those Locks Pools, beaches and soaking up the sun are sizzling-fun activities for you of course, but not so much for your hair. Aspiring hairstylists out there also take note, for informing your clients of this too can keep summertime business flowing; protect, protect, protect! Before a refreshing dip in the pool, refresh your hair with a thin coat of conditioner; the proteins in conditioner protect hair from harmful chemicals that break, discolor and dry. Washing hair after your swim with a shampoo containing an acetic acid cleanses strands and rids of chlorine. Shampooing before however, won’t do you any good: “Strips away you protective oils, leaving hair vulnerable to drying chemicals and salts”- Celebrity Stylist Adir Abergel Dear beachgoers and sunbathers, many, many days of moisturizing lay ahead of you. Hair products with silicone and SPF are stellar steps to stunning post-summer hair. The hefty heat waves of summer will dry out and cause baffling breakage throughout the hair; hair spray, shine products and others with silicone, will seal the hair with moisturizer. UV rays can create a dramatic discoloration to the rich red you intended on keeping; keep conditioners, light shampoos and mousse full of SPF, filled up in your cabinet. Products like these with ingredients like glycerin, gives hair the extra sun protection it needs. Tinkering and Tangling Put the brush down, and unplug those hair dryers. Hairstylists everywhere will tell you that taming your hair with a brush and with any heat application, especially during the summer, will only tangle your patience. Due to the excess heat, when your hair dries out it is more liable to break. Try a new look, like those pretty little pig-tail braids, or twists; dos like these will do some good by not tangling hair. Also use a detangling spray for those high temperature tangles. Since healthy hair doesn't have significant breakage, it can reach longer lengths than damaged hair can. The world record for the longest hair growth was 23 to 26 feet on a Hindu holy man in the 1940s.-“Healthy Hair Facts” Livestrong.com Food For Thought Thinking about going to your friends BBQ? Don’t hesitate for your hair loves the idea! Every hairstylist will tell you that a healthy diet, will definitely promote healthy hair. Hair is basically made of keratin, a protein! Fish Fry Friday is a huge summer splash at the supermarkets, so take advantage of feeding your hair with proteins while you shop for your moisturizing conditioner. Keep hydrated as well; by drinking plenty of water, you’re helping keep your hair hydrated and enriched. Summer is here and so is the fear for your beautiful, happy, healthy hair. But do not fear, follow these few tips and your hair will be just fine. Summer sun and heat will damage its strength and chlorine will capture its shine. Hair health for the summer months requires moisture, good care and healthy hydration; keep these in mind and the next time you go to your hairstylist for your post-season styling, they’ll ask “did you even go outside this summer?”

How Much to Tip Your Hair Stylist and Makeup Artist

How Much to Tip Your Hair and Makeup Artist. Per Hendrickson, a standard gratuity amount should fall between 15 and 20 percent of your total service fee. That service fee would not include the ...

Like all wedding vendors, your hair and makeup artists work hard on your wedding day. Early start times, long hours on their feet, the pressure to get things just right for photos—it’s not exactly a walk in the park. Showing how thankful you are for their effort will go a long way and that gratitude begins with, well, gratuity. 

"A tip helps guarantee your people show up to the best of their ability," says wedding hair and makeup pro Mia Hendrickson. "It energizes and inspires hair and makeup artists to [do things] bigger, brighter, and better."

Meet the Expert

Mia Hendrickson is the owner of Mia Farah Beautique, a Philadelphia-based onsite hair and makeup outfit that also services clients in New York, New Jersey, and Florida. She has been working with brides since 2004. 

Gratuity also helps your vendors offset any money lost from not spending the day in a salon. Think about it: Most weddings occur on the weekend, which is when hair pros will likely see the most clients in their chairs. If they’re devoting an entire Saturday to travel to you and your bridesmaids instead, they could potentially be losing out on business. So, you’ll definitely want to offer a little extra for their time, but it can be tricky to figure out the appropriate amount. Not sure how much to tip your hair stylist and makeup artist on your wedding day? Read on for Hendrickson’s expert guidance. 

Per Hendrickson, a standard gratuity amount should fall between 15 and 20 percent of your total service fee. That service fee would not include the cost of add-ons provided by the artist, such as mink lashes, hair extensions, or hair accessories, nor would it include any costs associated with travel, such as mileage or an overnight hotel stay. That said, if your artist has traveled far outside of their typical geographic area to work with you, they may be missing out on other jobs or time with their family to be at your wedding. In those instances, a little extra cash is always appreciated. 

Before you start tipping, check your contract—your vendor may have already built a service fee into your total amount, or they may have a specific method for distributing tips amongst staff. If no guidelines are stipulated, each artist should be tipped individually based on the services they perform. For example, if one artist does makeup for three bridesmaids at a rate of 0 per person, she should be tipped 15 to 20 percent of 0. Rates for each service should be discussed ahead of time, but if you are charged one lump sum for the work of multiple artists, it's best to split the total tip amount evenly amongst all of the artists present.

For easy distribution that doesn’t feel too impersonal, place cash and a quick thank you card in an envelope. No need to pen a novel—a pre-written “Thanks for making us look and feel our best!” works great.

Yes! Gratuity shows your appreciation for services rendered. If a business owner is also functioning as an artist, they deserve that appreciation.

Yes. It’s easiest for all parties involved if the person covering the cost of a service also covers the tip.

Some artists charge higher service rates for VIPs such as the bride or mother of the bride because their services may take longer or involve extras such as airbrush makeup. If your service costs more, you’ll end up tipping more, but you do not need to move beyond the 15 to 20 percent range if your artist is working on multiple people on your wedding day. If, however, the artist came out specifically for you, Hendrickson suggests tipping more to help account for any other business opportunities they may have missed out on that day.  

Each artist’s tip should be calculated based on the cost of their service. If a hair service costs more than a makeup service, then your hair stylist's tip will be larger.

"Satisfaction with our service really is connected to you allotting us enough time," says Hendrickson. So while 7 a.m. might seem like a painfully early call time, know that your vendor has plotted out a schedule that will ensure no one is rushed into a too-quick updo or an uneven contour. In the same vein, you also want to heed their guidance when it comes to booking the appropriate amount of artists for the day. "The sweet spot is four services in a five-hour block," says Hendrickson. A bride plus seven bridesmaids equates to 16 hair and makeup services total, which would require four artists.

Yes! Hair and makeup artistry requires a ton of mental and physical energy, so bring on the bagels and the caffeine. If you’re ordering breakfast for your bridesmaid group, factor in the headcount for your artists as well. And if an artist is staying late for touch-ups after the ceremony, you may also want to order them a vendor dinner. 

"When someone performs a duty that is out of the scope of the contract, you should increase their gratuity," says Hendrickson. If your artist squeezes in extra appointments last-minute or stays through the reception for a hair change or makeup touch-ups and that wasn’t previously discussed, consider adding on to their tip. 

Reviews are nice, but for Hendrickson, referrals are where it's at. So if you truly loved an artist’s services, sing their praises whenever someone asks for a recommendation. "I get excited when I get a referral because they’re likely going to be from the same like-minded pool of people," Hendrickson says. "I can let my guard down and be a little more relaxed."

How Much to Tip Your Hairstylist — The Proper Tip For A ...

22-05-2019 · How Much to Tip for a Haircut, Style, or Color Service. "If you are in a salon, plan to add a 20% tip ," says Clara Leonard, hairstylist for Book Your Look, who adds, "you can always ask the front ...

22-05-2019
How much to tip hair stylist

George MarksGetty Images

A trip to the salon is the perfect time to sit back, relax, and have a chat (or not!) with your stylist while you get a fun new hairstyle. But when it comes time to pay, there's always the slightly awkward moment: How much do you tip? And who should you tip? We asked salon pros to tell us what they expect — or at least the norm. Spoiler alert: It all depends on what service you're getting, plus special circumstances detailed here.

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"If you are in a salon, plan to add a 20% tip," says Clara Leonard, hairstylist for Book Your Look, who adds, "you can always ask the front desk what the standard is." This includes haircuts, hair color services, and styling (such as blowouts and updos). Note: Many stylists prefer cash so their tip is separate from the bill — and it isn't taxed.

How Much to Tip Your Salon Assistant

Sometimes it takes a village to get a killer 'do, so don't skimp out on the salon assistant who washes your hair or helps throughout your service. But one thing to remember: Your stylist may be tipping the assistant out at the end of the day or week, so you can add that to your overall tip, asking that they share it.

Or just tip the assistant separately: "There are a good amount of people who also tip a couple of dollars to the assistants, which is always nice and really appreciated," says Sierra Bowling, a longtime salon receptionist.

Tipping for an In-Home Styling Session

If you book an in-home blowout, updo, bridal party, or styling service via a salon or through an app, Leonard recommends paying them through the service provider, then tipping 20% in cash in person.

Tipping for a Bang Trim

Many salons offer free fringe touch-ups, but still, you may want to reward your stylist for her efforts — in that case, pass on a couple dollars. Paid for a proper trim? "I recommend tipping 10% on a bang trim," says hairstylist Erick Orellana of Salon Republic in West Hollywood, California.

How Much Should You Tip a Friend Stylist?

Got a friend who's a talented stylist? Consider yourself lucky, but don't forget that this is how they make their living. "If you are getting a cut or color from a friend and you know that they're giving you a discount, up the tip to 30% in cash," advises Leonard. Otherwise, 20% is fine.

Should You Tip if You Don't Like Your Haircut?

If you were clear with your stylist about what you wanted and communicated to them that you weren't happy after your hair was done, but your stylist refused to alter your hair to your liking, then a smaller tip is merited. But if you didn't tell your stylist that you disliked like your hair nor gave them a chance to fix it, then deducting from their tip doesn't make much sense.

Feel too awkward to say anything? Check out these stylist-approved tips for communicating your feelings in a respectful way. If you head back to the salon to get the style fixed, etiquette expert Peggy Post recommends paying a 15 to 20% tip to the stylist, especially if they adjust it for free.

Should You Ever Tip More Than 20% at the Hair Salon?

There are certain circumstances when tipping more than 20% is a good idea, says stylist and HAUS Salon owner Charlie Brackney. He recommends adding a little extra if you're a new client and the stylist is spending a significant amount of time on your consultation and design, if you're doing an intensive transformation (i.e. going from blonde to brunette), or if it's a holiday.

And if you're running really late to your appointment or you've brought rowdy kids along to the salon, tipping a few extra dollars is a nice gesture that shows your stylist you care about their time. Lastly, you can also tip above the going rate if you feel like you received exceptional results and/or service.

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How Much You Should Tip Your Hairstylist, According to ...

21-07-2021 · Not quite sure how much to tip your hairstylist after a salon trip? Five hairstylists reveal how much you should tip your hairdresser!

21-07-2021

Knowing exactly how much you should tip your hairstylist isn’t as easy as it seems. Do you stick with the standard 20 percent? Should you do more? Should you tip at all?

These questions run through our minds during every salon visit, so instead of letting the anxiety get to us, we decided to go straight to the stylists themselves. From Florida to Australia, we reached out to five different stylists all across the globe to discover just how much you should tip your hairdresser. See what they had to say below!

1. Redken Brand Ambassador and Colorist Ryan Pearl Based in Boca Raton, Florida: 20%

“A lot of people don’t know we work on commission and getting tipped is a huge part of our income,” he says. “We all know standard would be 20 percent. But if you went to a restaurant and the food and service were great, plus you had a great experience, you most likely would tip more, correct? The same goes with tipping your stylist.”

2. Hair Artist Jenna Machingo Based in Los Angeles, Long Beach, and San Diego, California: Doesn’t Expect Tip

“I think tips are not something to expect,” she notes. “I feel people should tip how they feel. Sometimes getting your hair done exceeds what you thought it would be, but some people can’t drop that big number plus some.”

3. Hairstylist Amy Baines Based in Western Australia: No Tipping Culture

“In Australia, we don’t really have a tipping culture,” she mentions. “The most frequent amount we as hairdressers would receive in tips would be between and AUD. There are a few exceptions where clients may tip upwards of 0 AUD if they are super happy with their service, but generally speaking, they are visiting Australia from another country. A more common practice would actually be to gift. Most hairstylists have an established clientele with who we grow close. For special occasions, such as holidays or even just as a thank you, gifts are given to show appreciation.”

4. MCH Global Hairstylist Daniel Kim Based in Beverly Hills, California: 20%

“It really depends on the service,” he notes. “Typically, I say 20 percent of the total for the services. If it’s a free service, like bang trims and such, I would say to is pretty good.”

5. Hair Artist Alaina Morse Based in Edmonton, Alberta: 20%

“My general rule of thumb is always at least 20 percent for just any service,” she states. “But as a stylist, I never expect a tip. If someone tips, then bonus. If they don’t, oh well. And if someone leaves a massive tip, you always notice.”

How Much to Tip Your Stylist After a Visit to Your ...

01-05-2018 · How much to tip a hairdresser. Now you may be wondering,”What percentage should I tip my hairdresser?” Well, that depends on the service you’re receiving. The most agreed-upon tip is 20 percent. However, it fluctuates a little bit. If you are ever unsure, just stick to the 20 percent. But, here’s a few other standard tip percentages: Corrective color: 25%; Complimentary redo: 15-20% of ...

01-05-2018

You’re wondering how much to tip the person who just made you look and feel amazing. You’ve just visited a hair or nail salon, and you look fabulous. Your hair no longer looks like a hot mess. Your fingernails are perfection. Now what?

Figuring out what to tip can be stressful in any situation, but figuring out how much to tip your stylist is even more confusing. This is likely a person you will come to more than once, so you want them to know you appreciate them. Undertipping would be embarrassing. You’ve finally found that perfect salon near you, so, how do you figure out what to tip?

Don’t worry; it doesn’t have to cause you anxiety. (Neither does finding the perfect salon!) Once you have a few resources, you’ll be able to figure out that tip in no time, leaving you and your stylist with smiles on your faces.

How to Figure out How Much to Tip

First of all, it’s important to know that tipping at your hair or nail salon is not like tipping at a restaurant. You are going to develop a relationship with your hairstylist and visit them many times over. Today outlined how much to tip your hairstylist and manicurist:

Start from 20 percent to be fair. Young mothers up the ante if their preschoolers are in on the haircut. If you arrive late or have a toddler with you, you should increase your tip. Other reasons to tip more: if the salon squeezes you in at the last moment, your styling includes a shoulder massage, or your manicure includes a hand massage. The bottom line: If you like your hairstylist, tip at least 20 percent. It helps build relations with the salon and is especially helpful in procuring a last-minute appointment.

You want your stylist to value you as a customer. Tipping them well is your way of letting them know how much you appreciate them. In turn, they will treat you as well as you have treated them. You absolutely do not want to be the kind of person who treats your stylist as if their time did not matter to you. Frankly, you shouldn’t treat anyone in the service industry that way.

Watch this short video about tipping etiquette at the salon:

A Tip Chart: Make Tipping Easy

The good news about trying to determine how much to tip in a salon is that lots of other people have had the same question. In fact, it is such a common question that there are guides called a “tip chart” floating around out there. Stylists don’t want you to face this uncomfortable problem as much as you, so they’ve been nice enough to make these simple, downloadable charts. Here’s a couple for you to choose from.

tip chart

Image by Author, All Rights Reserved

This is a small chart that uses simple percentages. We will provide you with a tool below that helps you figure that out. But for now, this is pretty basic.

tip chart

Image by Author, All Rights Reserved

For those of you who are like me and can’t do percentages well, this is the chart for you. It provides you with actual dollar amounts and their correlating tip amounts. Both of these charts can be saved on your mobile device so that you always have them on hand. You won’t ever have to stand there nervously and do a bunch of math in your head while standing in front of the salon register.

A tip calculator: use one, they are awesome

If you have never heard of a tip calculator, you are missing out. Some of us don’t want to search through 3,000 photos on our phones to find the tip charts, so that’s where the calculator comes in. You can do a quick search on your mobile search engine and find it pretty quickly. Calculator.net and Onlineconversion.com both have simple tip calculators. You can also find one in the app store on your phone. The calculator allows you to plug in the cost of your bill, choose the percentage you would like to tip, and it does all the work for you. You will never again wonder how much to tip with one of those calculators.

How much to tip a hairdresser

Now you may be wondering,”What percentage should I tip my hairdresser?” Well, that depends on the service you’re receiving. The most agreed-upon tip is 20 percent. However, it fluctuates a little bit. If you are ever unsure, just stick to the 20 percent. But, here’s a few other standard tip percentages:

  • Corrective color: 25%
  • Complimentary redo: 15-20% of the original price
  • Trim: 10%
  • Support staff (hair washer, colorist): -
  • Child’s haircut: 15%

Remember, the more complicated the service, the more you should tip. If you are just getting a trim, tipping ten percent is perfectly fine. However, if your hairdresser just spent three hours trying to correct your hair color after you bought a box of bleach at the Dollar Store, tip them more. Often, people in the service industry rely on these tips to survive. You do not want to be the unpleasant person who tips your hairdresser five dollars after they labored over your hair for hours. Not only is it rude, but it’s also ungrateful. Nobody likes a person like that.

Do I tip if I hate my style?

You should absolutely tip even when you do not like your style. You do not have to tip 20 percent, but 10-15 percent is reasonable. Sometimes things happen in the salon that are out of the stylist’s control that may lead to you not liking the style. For instance, if you go to a salon for coloring but do not reveal that you used over-the-counter color, your hair may not look right. This isn’t the stylist’s fault, it’s yours, and you should still tip.

Other times, the stylist may not have understood exactly what you wanted, and your cut is not exactly what you were looking for. In cases like that, 10-15 percent is also reasonable.

Don’t forget, however, to speak to the stylist or manager when you’re not happy with the service. It’s more than likely that they will offer you a free appointment to fix your hair. They cannot offer to fix it, though, if you don’t tell them what’s wrong. So, speak up and let them know what is wrong. Communication is key when you are getting any service.

Don’t Stress, Learning How Much to Tip Is Simple

See? It’s not as intimidating as you thought it would be. You don’t have to freak out and worry. Just keep in mind that your stylist is providing a service for you. That service is meant to make you feel and look good. When someone makes you feel good, you want to make them feel good. Moreover, tipping well is the perfect way to foster a great relationship between you and your stylist. When you show your stylist that you care about them, they will go the extra mile for you. This will come in handy if you ever have a hair emergency and need to get to the salon right away. The people at the salon will remember that you are a fantastic customer who takes care of their stylists, and they’ll get you in as soon as possible.

If you really don’t want to tip, but want that salon-fresh look, here are some beauty tips to try at home.

This is one of those situations where the Golden Rule can make all the difference: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

Featured Image: CC by 2.0, by Nan Palmero, via Flickr