Results for: How many people die from the flu each year

20 search results for how many people die from the flu each year is presented below.

Are you looking for how many people die from the flu each year? The official links that we have supplied below are the simplest method to do so. All of our links are kept up to date at all times.

thepumphandle.org

by revere, cross-posted from Effect Measure There have been questions in the comments about where the CDC estimate of 36,000 to 40,000 influenza related deaths a year …

quora.com

For the 2018–2019 season, approximately 34,000 Americans died from complications arising partly from influenza. For the 2019–2020 season, that figure was approximately 22,000. See: …

treatmentactiongroup.org

While flu viruses can circulate all year-round, flu peaks between December and February. On October 6, President Trump minimized deaths from the COVID-19 by comparing …

People also ask
  • How does the flu actually kill people?

    The "regular" flu kills about 35,000 people every year, mostly infants and the elderly. I think pneumonia is the main complication that causes deaths. Those at most risk have co-morbidities. If someone has COPD their respiratory function is already compromised so it doesn't take much more to push them over the edge.
    How does the flu kill people?? - Disaster Preparation
  • How many people are hospitalized from flu every year?

    While the effects of flu varies, it places a substantial burden on the health of people in the United States each year. CDC estimates that flu has resulted in 9 million – 41 million illnesses, 140,000 – 710,000 hospitalizations and 12,000 – 52,000 deaths annually between 2010 and 2020.
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    The flu, or influenza, is a contagious respiratory illness caused by viruses that infect the nose, throat, and sometimes the lungs. The flu spreads mostly from person to person, and people with flu are most contagious in the first three to four days after their illness begins.

    The flu can come on suddenly. Early symptoms can include fatigue, body aches and chills, cough, sore throat, and fever. For most people, influenza resolves on its own, but sometimes, the flu, and its complications, can be deadly.

    Flu viruses travel through the air in droplets when someone with the infection coughs, sneezes, or talks. You can inhale the droplets directly, or you can pick up the germs from an object and then transfer them to your eyes, nose, or mouth. People with flu can spread it to others up to about six feet away.

    At the time of publishing this article, influenza activity in the United States for the 2018-2019 flu season remained low. The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness increased slightly to 1.7 percent, which is below the national baseline of 2.2 percent.

    The 2017-2018 flu season, however, was one of the deadliest in decades, with high levels of outpatient clinic and emergency department visits for flu-like illness and high flu-related hospitalization rates.

    You can find out more about flu facts and statistics, below.

    There are four types of influenza viruses: A, B, C, and D. Human influenza A and B viruses cause seasonal epidemics almost every winter in the United States.

    Influenza C infections generally cause a mild respiratory illness and are not thought to cause epidemics. Meanwhile, influenza D viruses primarily affect cattle and are not known to infect or cause illness in humans.

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    Most people who get sick with flu will have mild illness, will not need medical care or antiviral drugs, and will recover in less than two weeks. People at higher risk of developing flu complications include:

    • children younger than age 5, especially those younger than age 2
    • adults older than age 65
    • residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities
    • pregnant women and women up to two weeks postpartum
    • people with weakened immune systems
    • people who have chronic illnesses, such as asthma, heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease, and diabetes
    • people who are very obese, with a body mass index of 40 or higher

    The flu has resulted in 9.3 million to 49 million illnesses each year in the United States since 2010. Each year, on average, five to 20 percent of the United States population gets the flu.

    It is estimated that the flu results in 31.4 million outpatient visits and more than 200,000 hospitalizations each year.

    During the severe 2017-2018 flu season, one of the longest in recent years, estimates indicate that more than 900,000 people were hospitalized and more than 80,000 people died from flu.

    Additionally, as of late October 2018, 185 pediatric deaths had been reported to CDC during the 2017-2018 season. Approximately 80 percent of these deaths occurred in children who had not received a flu vaccination.

    Last season took the greatest toll on adults age 65 years and older. About 58 percent of the estimated hospitalizations occurred in that age group.

    The flu costs an estimated .4 billion a year in direct medical expenses and another .3 billion in lost earnings annually.

    Additionally, the flu causes United States employees to miss approximately 17 million workdays due to flu, which costs an estimated billion a year in sick days and lost productivity.

    One report put the estimate of the cost of lost productivity to employers due to the flu in 2017-2018 at more than billion, according to employment consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. Moreover, an estimated 25 million workers got sick, while 5.68 was the average amount of wages lost due to missing shifts.

    A 2018 report estimated the average annual total economic burden of seasonal influenza to the American healthcare system and society was .2 billion. Direct medical costs were estimated to be .2 billion and indirect costs billion.

    The single best way to protect against the flu is to get vaccinated each year. The CDC recommends an annual flu shot for everyone older than six months old.

    The flu vaccine is available as an injection or as a nasal spray. The most common way that flu vaccines are made is using an egg-based manufacturing process that has been used for more than 70 years.

    There is also a cell-based production process for flu vaccines, which was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2012. A third type of vaccine was approved for use in the United States in 2013; this version involves using recombinant technology.

    While the annual influenza vaccine isn’t 100 percent effective, it’s still the best defense against the flu. Vaccine effectiveness can vary from season to season and among different age and risk groups and even by vaccine type.

    Recent studies, however, show that flu vaccination reduces the risk of flu illness by between 40 percent and 60 percent among the overall population during seasons when most circulating flu viruses are well-matched to the flu vaccine.

    During the 2016-2017 influenza season, the CDC estimates that flu vaccine prevented an estimated 5.3 million illnesses, 2.6 million medical visits, and 85,000 hospitalizations associated with influenza.

    A 2017 study concluded that flu vaccination reduced the risk of flu-associated death by half among children with underlying high-risk medical conditions. For healthy children, it cut the risk by nearly two-thirds.

    Another study published in 2018 showed getting a flu shot lessened the risk of severe flu among adults and also reduced the severity of illness.

    Among adults who were admitted to the hospital with flu, vaccinated adults were 59 percent less likely to have a very severe illness that resulted in intensive care unit admission than those who had not been vaccinated.

    The overall vaccine effectiveness of the 2017-2018 flu vaccine against both influenza A and B viruses is estimated to be 40 percent. This means the flu vaccine reduced a person’s overall risk of having to seek medical care at a doctor’s office for flu illness by 40 percent.

    For the last several seasons, flu vaccination coverage among children age 6 months to 17 years has remained steady, but has fallen short of national public health goals, which is 80 percent.

    During the 2017-2018 season, coverage dropped to 57.9 percent compared with 59 percent the year before. In the same time period, flu vaccination coverage among adults was 37.1 percent, a decrease of 6.2 percentage points from the year before.

    For the 2018-2019 season, vaccine manufacturers have estimated that up to 168 million doses of influenza vaccine will be available in the United States.

    Most people who get flu will recover anywhere from a few days to less than two weeks, but high-risk children and adults may develop complications such as:

    • pneumonia
    • bronchitis
    • asthma flare-ups
    • sinus infections
    • heart problems
    • ear infections

    The flu is a common cause of pneumonia, especially among younger children, the elderly, pregnant women, or those with certain chronic health conditions or who live in a nursing home. In 2016, influenza and pneumonia were the eighth-leading cause of death in the United States.

    People 65 years and older are at greater risk of serious complications from the flu. Estimates of the number of flu patients who also develop a bacterial infection range from as low as 2 percent to as high as 65 percent, according to one 2016 report.

    It is estimated that between 70 and 85 percent of seasonal flu-related deaths have occurred in people 65 years and older. Between 50 and 70 percent of seasonal flu-related hospitalizations have occurred among people in that age group.

    In addition to the flu shot, the CDC recommends everyday preventative actions like staying away from people who are sick, covering coughs and sneezes, and frequent handwashing.

    If you do get the flu, antiviral drugs — which can make the illness milder and shorten the time you are sick — can be prescribed by a doctor and can mean the difference between having a milder illness versus a very serious illness that could result in a hospital stay.

    Frequently Asked Questions about Estimated Flu Burden
  • What are the chances of dying from the flu?

    Adults 65 years and olderChildren younger than 2 years old 1AsthmaNeurologic and neurodevelopment conditionsBlood disorders (such as sickle cell disease)Chronic lung disease (such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] and cystic fibrosis)Endocrine disorders (such as diabetes mellitus) More items...

    A recent short article in Scientific American Mind looked at the following question: suppose you have a 5 percent chance of dying from a flu vaccine but a 10 percent chance of contracting and dying of the flu when an epidemic strikes. Do you take the flu shot? Surprisingly often, people do not. (See "Which Flu Risk Would You Take?," by Nicole Garbarini, in Head Lines, Scientific American Mind, Aug./Sept. 2006).

    This apparent irrationality is commonly attributed to "omission bias"-people often prefer inaction to action, even if inaction carries some greater risk. But I think there are other reasons, too. For one thing, authorities commonly have a bias toward action, if only to justify their own existence. If so, the consequences of the flu may be overstated or the risks of the vaccine are understated.

    But even if the listed probabilities are to be believed and the bias toward inaction is corrected, there is the observation that the risk of being unvaccinated decreases if most other people take the flu vaccine.

    Suppose in fact that your likelihood of dying from the flu when unvaccinated goes down according to the following formula: if a fraction f (excluding you) of the population takes the flu shot, then your probability of dying from the flu is just (1-f)*10%. For example, if 65 percent of the people take it and you are among the 35 percent who do not, then the probability of your dying from the flu is only 0.35 * 10% = 3.5%.

    Warm-Up:

    Suppose a government official could require 60 percent of the people to take the vaccine. Then what would be the average risk of death for the entire population due to the flu?

    Solution to Warm-Up:

    Recall that if the official doesn't allow anyone to take the vaccine, then the death toll is 10 percent. If the official forces everyone to take it, the death toll is 5 percent. If 60 percent take the shot, then those people have a 5 percent chance of dying, but the others have only a 40 percent chance of dying from the flu, so the death toll among them is 4 percent. The overall death toll therefore is (0.6 * 5%) (0.4 * 4%) = 4.6%.

    1. As long as the government is in a compelling mode, what fraction should be required to take the vaccine to minimize the average risk overall?

    On the other hand, suppose that the government feels it cannot compel people to take the shot. Instead, the government offers each person the flu shot in turn. If a person refuses, then there is no second chance. Each person knows how many people took the flu shot among those already offered. Each person believes and knows that everyone else believes the government's risk figures (5 percent if a person takes it; 10 percent modified by the f formula above if a person doesn't). Each person will take the flu shot if and only if it helps him or her. There is no regard for the greater good.

    2. Under those conditions, what percentage of people will take the flu shot?

    The government looks at the results and decides that a little benevolent disinformation is in order. That is, the government will inflate the publicized risk of death from the flu to a number R that is greater than 10 percent, but the decrease in risk will also be adjusted to use R instead of 10 percent-that is, to (1-f)*R. The exaggerated risk strategy is a carefully guarded secret, so everyone believes the government and knows that everyone else does too.

    3. Again, the government will compel nobody. To which percentage should the risk of disease be inflated to achieve the optimum vaccination level you determined in your answer to question 1?

    Disclaimer: The actual death rates associated with the flu and flu vaccines are typically far smaller than the numbers used in these examples. The scenario of benevolent disinformation is purely invented. Purely.

    What are the chances of dying from the flu at 16?
  • What is the survival rate of flu?

    To Fauci, given how infectious the new coronavirus has proven to be, that is a very dire figure. A 1% mortality rate “means it is 10-times more lethal than the seasonal flu,” Fauci said. “I think that’s something people can get their arms around and understand.” A 99% survival rate might sound promising.

    A Facebook meme states COVID-19 has a 98.54% survival rate and characterizes it as “Positive vs. Panic.” COVID-19 is the respiratory illness caused by the novel coronavirus.

    It’s an argument that echoes what Dr. Ben Carson, the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, said on Fox News on April 9. Carson, a pioneering brain surgeon turned politician, said about 98% of people infected with the new coronavirus are going to recover.

    “They’re going to do quite well, and we need to really start talking that up, and talking about what we can do,” Carson told Fox News host Martha MacCallum. “We can’t operate out of hysteria. When people are hysterical, they don’t do logical things.”

    What a 1% mortality rate means

    The figures cited on social media aren’t far off from mainstream projections. They may even be pessimistic about how likely someone is to survive a bout of COVID-19.

    Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testified to Congress in March that the mortality rate may be as low as 1% when accounting for people who are infected but don’t develop symptoms severe enough to be tested. To Fauci, given how infectious the new coronavirus has proven to be, that is a very dire figure.

    A 1% mortality rate “means it is 10-times more lethal than the seasonal flu,” Fauci said. “I think that’s something people can get their arms around and understand.”

    A 99% survival rate might sound promising. But when it’s scaled out to the rest of the country – all 329 million residents – a 1% survival rate takes on a different meaning.

    The attending physician for Congress and the U.S. Supreme Court predicted early in the pandemic that 70 million to 150 million U.S. residents would contract COVID-19. A 1% mortality rate at that scale of infection is between 700,000 and 1.5 million dead – roughly the population of Washington, D.C., on the low end or the entire population of Hawaii on the high end.

    COVID-19 mortality rate depends on age, spread of disease

    The exact mortality rate of COVID-19 in the United States isn’t yet known. Outcomes depend on many factors, from the level of strain on the health care system to an infected person's health history and age.

    "You really need to look at this by age, because there is an enormous age gradient for risk of death per infected case,” said Dr. Theo Vos in an interview with USA TODAY. He is a professor of health metrics sciences at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluations at the University of Washington and one of the developers of a highly cited model on the potential spread of COVID-19.

    Reports of deaths from the disease by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show a clear correlation to age. Older people are far more likely to die of the disease. 

    Vos cautioned against using the reported figures to infer universal mortality rates. Outcomes are too variable across age groups, and too many people may have had the disease but were never formally tested.

    “Those are based on the numbers of people who happen to have been tested, not the true number of cases in the community,” Vos said. “With these antibody studies, we’re seeing a considerable gap between people who have had a positive test and the number of people we think have truly been in contact with the virus.”

    Stopping the spread can improve outcomes

    Yumou Qiu, assistant professor of statistics at Iowa State University, helped develop a model measuring the rate of spread around the globe. He found that once social distancing efforts took hold, the number of people each carrier infected started to drop. The United States reached its peak rate of spread, about 4.4 new people infected per carrier, on about March 11. It is now at about 0.98, meaning the spread is slowing.

    He also tracked death rates and found that countries where the health care system was overwhelmed, such as Italy, experienced a spike in that metric. He referenced flattening the curve, or slowing the spread of the disease so it never creates a peak medical need that’s higher than the country’s capacity to deliver care.

    “(The observed mortality rate) varies country to country,” Qiu said. “That’s why epidemiological experts say to flatten the curve. If we don’t control the curve, then we can overwhelm the health care system.”

    Our ruling: Partly false

    It is true that the overall rate may be 1% or lower, when factoring in those infected by the coronavirus who were never tested. But definitive statements about the mortality rate are misleading to the point of falsehood. We rule the claim that COVID-19 has a survival rate of 98.5% to be PARTLY FALSE, based on our research.

    There are too many factors that affect the outcome if people are infected with the new coronavirus to make a blanket statement about mortality rates. A person’s age or underlying health conditions, and if there’s capacity in the health care system for proper care are key among them.

    Further, too little is known about the disease, including the true reach of its spread.

    Our fact-check sources:

    • Congressional testimony by Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease
    • Interview with Dr. Theo Vos. Vos, professor of health metrics sciences at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluations at the University of Washington
    • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    • Interview with Yumou Qiu, assistant professor of statistics at Iowa State University

    Thank you for supporting our journalism. You can subscribe to our print edition, ad-free app or electronic newspaper replica here.

    Our fact check work is supported in part by a grant from Facebook.

    • Flu mortality rate in U.S. by age
This Is How Many People Die From the Flu Each Year ...

Globally, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the flu kills 290,000 to 650,000 people per year. Those numbers can vary so much from year to …

Flu season in the US, which runs from October through May, normally claims tens of thousands of lives every year. But there's never an exact number of flu deaths for any year—that's because the flu is not a reportable disease in most states, and not everyone who develops the flu seeks care or gets tested, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Instead, the agency develops estimates based on rates of laboratory-confirmed, flu-associated hospitalizations.

how-many-people-die-flu , Portrait of young woman wearing patient cloths sneezing in tissue at hospital. - Conceptual of sickness woman feeling when admitted in the hospital.

Last year, however, as the COVID-19 pandemic dominated the US, influenza cases were at an all-time low: Data from the CDC, supplied to JAMA, shows that out of 1.3 million specimens collected by labs between October 3, 2020 and July 24, 2021, only 2,136 were positive for influenza. Of those 2,136 influenza cases, there were only 748 flu-related deaths.

That's a huge difference from the rates of the 2019–2020 flu season. Per the CDC, there were an estimated 35 million flu-related illnesses—that number includes 16 million medical visit for the flu; 380,000 flu-related hospitalizations; and 20,000 deaths due to influenza.

Of course, those data are only from two specific years—and they show two very different ways the flu impacted the US population. Here's what you need to know about how many people die from the flu each year, on average, what infectious disease experts are expecting for the upcoming 2021–2022 flu season, and how to protect yourself.

RELATED: Why Do Some People Die From the Flu? 

According to data collected by the CDC from 2010 to 2020, the agency estimates that the flu has caused 12,000–52,000 deaths annually. During that time, the flu also caused 9 million–41 million illnesses, and 140,000–710,000 hospitalizations. Globally, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the flu kills 290,000 to 650,000 people per year.  

Those numbers can vary so much from year to year, because what we know as "the flu" isn't one specific thing—it's actually made up of different influenza strains that circulate. "How many people die of the flu each year of the flu is definitely related to the strains that are circulating, how accurately researchers were able to predict what should go into the flu vaccine, and how many people are vaccinated," Anjali Mahoney, MD, MPH, family medicine specialist with Keck Medicine of USC, tells Health.

Certain influenza strains can also be more severe than others. "Sometimes there are years where there are big genetic shifts, and we can see a very different virus," Cassandra Pierre, MD, MPH, an infectious disease physician at Boston Medical Center, tells Health. Robert L. Murphy, MD, a professor of infectious diseases at Northwestern Medicine Feinberg School of Medicine, agrees, saying that the flu virus is always changing. "[Sometimes] it can be a nastier strain," he tells Health. "It goes up and down."

It's far too soon to say, but experts are still worried about what could happen. "We're mildly terrified about how things could unfold with flu season this year," James H. Conway, MD, FAAP, a pediatric infectious disease specialist and associate director for health sciences at the Global Health Institute of UW-Madison, tells Health.

This is for a few reasons. First: Australia—which has its winter and flu season during summertime in the US—didn't have a flu season this year. While that could be good news for a less severe season in the US, it also spells trouble for vaccine formulation. "Usually when the powers that be are trying to figure out which strains to put in the vaccine, they are basing it on what circulated in the southern hemisphere during summer," says Dr. Conway. "They didn't have any flu season, so the powers that be couldn't figure out prevalent flu strains."

The low numbers of flu cases last year could also negatively impact this year's flu season. With lower-than-usual rates of both flu vaccinations and flu cases, the US population is "relatively immunologically naive," says Dr. Conway—that means we don't have any leftover immunity from last flu season. Pair that with more people going out into public more often with lessening mask restrictions, and it could lead to a potentially more severe flu season than last year.

The straightforward answer here: Get vaccinated ASAP. "The only protection people can get is getting vaccinated and being careful about respiratory viruses," says Dr. Conway.

The CDC recommends that everyone 6 months and older get a flu vaccine every year. It's the first and most important step that people can take to guard against the flu and its complications. The flu can be harder to fight off for specific populations, such as infants and young children, the elderly, and people who are immunocompromised due to chronic illnesses such as HIV or cancer—so it's especially for those populations to get vaccinated, possibly with a high-dose flu shot, if approved by their doctor.

Those recommendations put in place for protection against COVID-19 can also come in handy when preventing the flu virus. "Everybody masking during winter months could help a lot with preventing flu deaths," says Dr. Conway. "That's done pretty regularly in some areas of the world. That may be as much a part of our major protection as major vaccines." In addition to that, Dr. Conway suggests that people remain vigilant about staying home from work and school when they're ill. Proper handwashing and disinfecting surfaces can help keep illnesses at bay, as well.

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How many people die from the flu?

How many people die from the flu? The CDC estimates that an average of 36,000 people died of the flu each year over the past decade. The worst recent flu season was 2017-2018, when 61,000 people died from the flu.

With the COVID-19 vaccination effort continuing and the infection rate declining, the nation might soon return to something like normal. But the US still contends with viruses like the seasonal flu annually. While much less deadly than the COVID-19 pandemic, the average flu season kills thousands of Americans each year, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

When is the flu season?

The CDC determines the start and end of flu season by monitoring flu activity — illnesses, medical visits, and hospitalizations — through its influenza surveillance systems. Most seasons begin in October, peak between December and February, and continue through May. The 2019-2020 flu season was unusual in that flu activity began to decline in March. According to the CDC, this was “perhaps associated with community prevention measures for COVID-19.”

The CDC estimates that an average of 36,000 people died of the flu each year over the past decade. The worst recent flu season was 2017-2018, when 61,000 people died from the flu. Around 22,000 people died of the flu during the shorter 2019-2020 season — the second lowest death total in the past 10 years, after the 12,000 flu deaths in the 2011-2012 season.

Even accounting for the fact that the COVID-19 pandemic has lasted a year instead of eight months, it has taken an average of 36,000 more lives per month when compared to the 2017-2018 flu season.

Disease Burden of Flu

06-01-2022 · While the effects of flu varies, it places a substantial burden on the health of people in the United States each year. CDC estimates that flu has resulted in 9 million – 41 million illnesses, 140,000 – 710,000 hospitalizations and 12,000 – 52,000 deaths annually between 2010 and 2020.

06-01-2022

Each year CDC estimates the burden of influenza in the U.S. CDC uses modeling to estimate the number of flu illnesses, medical visits, hospitalizations, and deaths related to flu that occurred in a given season. The methods used to calculate these estimates are described on CDC’s webpage, How CDC Estimates the Burden of Seasonal Flu in the U.S.

CDC uses the estimates of the burden of flu in the population and the impact of flu vaccination to inform policy and communications related to flu.

graphic of flu burden cases

The burden of flu disease in the United States can vary widely and is determined by a number of factors including the characteristics of circulating viruses, the timing of the season, how well the vaccine is working to protect against illness, and how many people got vaccinated. While the effects of flu varies, it places a substantial burden on the health of people in the United States each year.

CDC estimates that flu has resulted in 9 million – 41 million illnesses, 140,000 – 710,000 hospitalizations and 12,000 – 52,000 deaths annually  between 2010 and 2020.

Symptomatic Illnesses Medical Visits Hospitalizations Deaths
Season Estimate 95% U I Estimate 95% U I Estimate 95% U I Estimate 95% U I
2010-2011 21,000,000 (20,000,000 – 25,000,000) 10,000,000 (9,300,000 – 12,000,000) 290,000 (270,000 – 350,000) 37,000 (32,000 – 51,000)
2011-2012 9,300,000 (8,700,000 – 12,000,000) 4,300,000 (4,000,000 – 5,600,000) 140,000 (130,000 – 190,000) 12,000 (11,000 – 23,000)
2012-2013 34,000,000 (32,000,000 – 38,000,000) 16,000,000 (15,000,000 – 18,000,000) 570,000 (530,000 – 680,000) 43,000 (37,000 – 57,000)
2013-2014 30,000,000 (28,000,000 – 33,000,000) 13,000,000 (12,000,000 – 15,000,000) 350,000 (320,000 – 390,000) 38,000 (33,000 – 50,000)
2014-2015 30,000,000 (29,000,000 – 33,000,000) 14,000,000 (13,000,000 – 16,000,000) 590,000 (540,000 – 680,000) 51,000 (44,000 – 64,000)
2015-2016 24,000,000 (20,000,000 – 33,000,000) 11,000,000 (9,000,000 – 15,000,000) 280,000 (220,000 – 480,000) 23,000 (17,000 – 35,000)
2016-2017 29,000,000 (25,000,000 – 45,000,000) 14,000,000 (11,000,000 – 23,000,000) 500,000 (380,000 – 860,000) 38,000 (29,000 – 61,000)
2017-2018 41,000,000 (35,500,000 – 53,000,000) 21,000,000 (18,000,000 – 27,000,000) 710,000 (560,000 – 1,100,000) 52,000 (3,000 – 95,500)
2018-2019 29,000,000 (25,000,000 – 40,000,000) 17,000,000 (11,500,000 – 18,500,000) 380,000 (300,000 – 66,000) 28,000 (19,000 – 97,000)
Preliminary estimates* Estimate 95% UI Estimate 95% UI Estimate 95% UI Estimate 95% UI
2019-2020* 35,000,000 (30,000,000 – 49,000,000) 16,000,000 (14,000,000 – 22,000,000) 380,000 (312,000 – 630,000) 20,000 (18,000 – 80,000)

* Estimates from the 2019-2020 season are preliminary and may change as data are finalized.

graphic of flu burden by season

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Supporting Research

Here’s How Many People Actually Die From the Flu Each Year ...

22-12-2021 · Flu activity remains low for the 2020-2021 season due to COVID-19 prevention efforts. But how many people die from the flu each year? Doctors explain.

22-12-2021
  • The flu is back this winter, after an unusually mild season last year.
  • Flu season, which runs from October through May, usually results in millions of infections and thousands of deaths.
  • Doctors explain how COVID-19 prevention efforts have diminished flu-related deaths this year.

For nearly two years, the world has obsessively pored over news and statistics on COVID-19. While cases of COVID-19 have risen and fallen over time, we saw a pretty mild flu season last year. This year, numbers are already trending much higher.

Last fall, epidemiologists warned of an oncoming “twindemic” of COVID-19 and seasonal influenza. Now, cases of COVID-19 are exploding this winter, and there is also increased flu activity happening across the country.

It’s still flu season in the U.S., which runs from October through May, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). And like COVID-19, the flu can cause unpleasant symptoms, have lingering side effects, and even be deadly. While there were shockingly few confirmed cases of the flu last year, case counts are definitely up this year over the last. Here’s everything you need to know about the flu’s mortality rate, plus how it’s spreading this year.

How many people die from the flu each year?

The answer is slightly complicated: The CDC doesn’t have an exact count of the number of people who die from influenza each year. Instead, the federal agency develops estimates based on rates of confirmed hospitalizations from the flu.

For that reason, it’s difficult to compare flu deaths with those of COVID-19, which are actual documented deaths, says Mark Hicar, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of infectious disease at the University at Buffalo in New York. In fact, COVID-19 deaths are being tracked by confirmed cases, “but there are still going to be numbers of unconfirmed cases so the deaths from COVID-19 are probably higher then what is being reported,” Dr. Hicar says. So far, nearly 51 million Americans have been infected with COVID-19, resulting in more than more than 803,000 deaths, per the latest data from the CDC.

Compared to the 2019-2020 flu season, for example, the CDC estimated that more than 38 million became sick with influenza, leading to 400,000 hospitalizations and 22,000 deaths. That’s slightly lower than the 2018-2019 season (34,200 deaths) and significantly less than the 2017-2018 season (61,000 deaths).

Why can the flu be so deadly?

The flu is a contagious respiratory illness that’s caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs, the CDC explains. There are two main types—influenza A and B—that regularly circulate each year. While plenty of people get the flu, have a miserable period of illness, and then recover, others can actually die of the virus.

“Influenza is a respiratory virus that has the ability to kill at a very high rate, even in the modern era,” says infectious disease expert Amesh A. Adalja, M.D., a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. “In severe cases, it causes pneumonia that can be complicated with a secondary bacterial infection.”

Other possible serious complications triggered by the flu, per the CDC, can include:

  • inflammation of the heart (myocarditis)
  • inflammation of the brain (encephalitis)
  • inflammation of the muscle tissues (myositis, rhabdomyolysis)
  • multi-organ failure (like respiratory and kidney failure)
  • Sepsis, a life-threatening response to an infection

Who is most at risk of dying from the flu?

The CDC has a list of people who are at a higher-than-average risk of getting seriously ill with the flu and even dying of it:

  • Adults 65 and up
  • Pregnant people
  • Young children
  • Young children with neurological disease

Certain health conditions can also put people at a higher risk of severe flu, the CDC says, including:

  • Asthma
  • Heart disease and stroke
  • Diabetes
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Cancer
  • Chronic kidney disease

“The flu tends to kill people at the extremes of age: very young and very old,” Dr. Adalja says. “The very young and the old may have very low physiological reserve when it comes to fighting influenza off.”

How many total flu-related deaths are expected for the 2021-2022 season?

So far this flu season, 131 people have died from the virus, per the CDC. There have also been 7,516 positive flu cases this season, which is already a big jump over last year, per CDC data.

The numbers are higher than last year, which isn’t shocking, says William Schaffner, M.D., an infectious disease specialist and professor at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. “People are getting out more and taking less precautions” than they did last flu season, he says.

Still, the same disease-prevention practices we’ve mastered to slow the spread of COVID-19 can also impact impacted flu transmission, says David Cennimo, M.D., assistant professor of medicine-pediatrics infectious disease at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. While flu rates are higher than last year’s extraordinarily low numbers, they’re still lower than your average flu season. That’s “a byproduct” of efforts like masking, hand-washing, and social distancing, Dr. Cennimo says.

Flu deaths have also “depend on how many people get the flu vaccine,” says Richard Watkins, M.D., infectious disease physician and professor of medicine at the Northeast Ohio Medical University. Millions more doses than usual were distributed this winter, hinting at a higher rate of flu vaccination among the COVID-19 vaccine rollout.

How to protect yourself from the flu

If you haven’t already gotten your flu shot, Dr. Schaffner recommends doing it ASAP, as it takes time to build immunity. Flu season continues through May, after all. “It’s still not too late to get vaccinated,” he says.

The following precautions can also protect you from the flu:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces and objects.

Methods that help prevent the spread of COVID-19, like wearing a mask when you’re around people who aren’t in your household and practicing social distancing, can also help you prevent a cold, flu, and other respiratory illnesses. “The flu’s impact on deaths in the U.S. may well be blunted by our behaviors in trying to avoid COVID-19,” Dr. Schaffner says.

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Most years, the flu causes anywhere from 12,000 to 52,000 deaths. However, last year—at the height of the coronavirus pandemic—numbers dropped a bit.

How Many Americans Die From The Flu Each Year ...

06-10-2020 · Yesterday, President Trump claimed that "sometimes over 100,000" people die from the flu annually but CDC data shows that the true death toll is significantly lower, even in seasons that are ...

06-10-2020

As flu season gets underway in the United States, the futile debate about whether influenza viruses are deadlier than Covid-19 has already reared its ugly head on social media. Yesterday, President Trump tweeted that many people die from the flu every year, "sometimes over 100,000". The claim was quickly debunked and Twitter hid the president's post, marking it with a tag stating that it violated its rules about spreading misleading and potentially harmful information related to Covid-19. Up to October 07, the pandemic had claimed approximately 211,000 U.S. lives, a toll that is expected to continue rising steadily over the course of the winter months. So just how wrong was the president and how many Americans actually die from the flu each year?

Seasonal influenza viruses are detected year-round in the United States but they hit the country hardest during the fall and winter months, peaking between December and February. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that the 2019-2020 season involved two waves of activity and moderate severity with an estimated 38 million people falling ill, 18 million visiting a health care provider, 400,000 patients hospitalized and 22,000 lives lost. That being said, case counts do tend to run higher due to the fact that not everybody gets diagnosed for flu and cases/deaths are invariably missing from official totals. Still, the CDC's tally is significantly lower than the number quoted by President Trump on Twitter. Over the past decade, even the deadliest flu season had a death toll significantly lower than Trump's claim with the CDC estimating that 61,000 people died in 2017-2018.

*Click below to enlarge (charted by Statista)

Estimated number of deaths due to influenza in the U.S. by season

Statista
cdc.gov

13 rowsThese pages includes information about the estimated burden of influenza from past …

These pages includes information about the estimated burden of influenza from past seasons, including tables of the estimated influenza disease burden (and 95% credible interval [Cr I]) by age group. Information on how these estimates are calculated can be found on CDC’s web page How CDC Estimates the Burden of Seasonal Influenza in the U.S.

Symptomatic Illnesses Medical Visits Hospitalizations Deaths
Season Estimate 95% U I Estimate 95% U I Estimate 95% U I Estimate 95% U I
2010-2011 21,000,000 (20,000,000 – 25,000,000) 10,000,000 (9,300,000 – 12,000,000) 290,000 (270,000 – 350,000) 37,000 (32,000 – 51,000)
2011-2012 9,300,000 (8,700,000 – 12,000,000) 4,300,000 (4,000,000 – 5,600,000) 140,000 (130,000 – 190,000) 12,000 (11,000 – 23,000)
2012-2013 34,000,000 (32,000,000 – 38,000,000) 16,000,000 (15,000,000 – 18,000,000) 570,000 (530,000 – 680,000) 43,000 (37,000 – 57,000)
2013-2014 30,000,000 (28,000,000 – 33,000,000) 13,000,000 (12,000,000 – 15,000,000) 350,000 (320,000 – 390,000) 38,000 (33,000 – 50,000)
2014-2015 30,000,000 (29,000,000 – 33,000,000) 14,000,000 (13,000,000 – 16,000,000) 590,000 (540,000 – 680,000) 51,000 (44,000 – 64,000)
2015-2016 24,000,000 (20,000,000 – 33,000,000) 11,000,000 (9,000,000 – 15,000,000) 280,000 (220,000 – 480,000) 23,000 (17,000 – 35,000)
2016-2017 29,000,000 (25,000,000 – 45,000,000) 14,000,000 (11,000,000 – 23,000,000) 500,000 (380,000 – 860,000) 38,000 (29,000 – 61,000)
Preliminary estimates* Estimate 95% UI Estimate 95% UI Estimate 95% UI Estimate 95% UI
2017-2018* 45,000,000 (39,000,000 – 58,000,000) 21,000,000 (18,000,000 – 27,000,000) 810,000 (620,000 – 1,400,000) 61,000 (46,000 – 95,000)
2018-2019* 36,000,000 (31,000,000 – 45,000,000) 17,000,000 (14,000,000 – 21,000,000) 490,000 (390,000 – 770,000) 34,000 (26,000 – 53,000)
2019-2020* 38,000,000 (34,000,000 – 47,000,000) 18,000,000 (15,000,000 – 22,000,000) 400,000 (350,000 – 500,000) 22,000 (18,000 – 29,000)

* Estimates from the 2017-2018, 2018-2019, and 2019-2020 seasons are preliminary and may change as data are finalized.

Facts and Statistics About the Flu

19-11-2018 · The flu has resulted in 9.3 million to 49 million illnesses each year in the United States since 2010. Each year, on average, five to 20 percent of the United States population gets the flu.

19-11-2018
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The flu, or influenza, is a contagious respiratory illness caused by viruses that infect the nose, throat, and sometimes the lungs. The flu spreads mostly from person to person, and people with flu are most contagious in the first three to four days after their illness begins.

The flu can come on suddenly. Early symptoms can include fatigue, body aches and chills, cough, sore throat, and fever. For most people, influenza resolves on its own, but sometimes, the flu, and its complications, can be deadly.

Flu viruses travel through the air in droplets when someone with the infection coughs, sneezes, or talks. You can inhale the droplets directly, or you can pick up the germs from an object and then transfer them to your eyes, nose, or mouth. People with flu can spread it to others up to about six feet away.

At the time of publishing this article, influenza activity in the United States for the 2018-2019 flu season remained low. The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness increased slightly to 1.7 percent, which is below the national baseline of 2.2 percent.

The 2017-2018 flu season, however, was one of the deadliest in decades, with high levels of outpatient clinic and emergency department visits for flu-like illness and high flu-related hospitalization rates.

You can find out more about flu facts and statistics, below.

There are four types of influenza viruses: A, B, C, and D. Human influenza A and B viruses cause seasonal epidemics almost every winter in the United States.

Influenza C infections generally cause a mild respiratory illness and are not thought to cause epidemics. Meanwhile, influenza D viruses primarily affect cattle and are not known to infect or cause illness in humans.

10468-The_Flu-_Facts_Statistics_and_You-1296x1789-Infographic-1.jpg?w=1155&h=3756Share on Pinterest

Most people who get sick with flu will have mild illness, will not need medical care or antiviral drugs, and will recover in less than two weeks. People at higher risk of developing flu complications include:

  • children younger than age 5, especially those younger than age 2
  • adults older than age 65
  • residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities
  • pregnant women and women up to two weeks postpartum
  • people with weakened immune systems
  • people who have chronic illnesses, such as asthma, heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease, and diabetes
  • people who are very obese, with a body mass index of 40 or higher

The flu has resulted in 9.3 million to 49 million illnesses each year in the United States since 2010. Each year, on average, five to 20 percent of the United States population gets the flu.

It is estimated that the flu results in 31.4 million outpatient visits and more than 200,000 hospitalizations each year.

During the severe 2017-2018 flu season, one of the longest in recent years, estimates indicate that more than 900,000 people were hospitalized and more than 80,000 people died from flu.

Additionally, as of late October 2018, 185 pediatric deaths had been reported to CDC during the 2017-2018 season. Approximately 80 percent of these deaths occurred in children who had not received a flu vaccination.

Last season took the greatest toll on adults age 65 years and older. About 58 percent of the estimated hospitalizations occurred in that age group.

The flu costs an estimated .4 billion a year in direct medical expenses and another .3 billion in lost earnings annually.

Additionally, the flu causes United States employees to miss approximately 17 million workdays due to flu, which costs an estimated billion a year in sick days and lost productivity.

One report put the estimate of the cost of lost productivity to employers due to the flu in 2017-2018 at more than billion, according to employment consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. Moreover, an estimated 25 million workers got sick, while 5.68 was the average amount of wages lost due to missing shifts.

A 2018 report estimated the average annual total economic burden of seasonal influenza to the American healthcare system and society was .2 billion. Direct medical costs were estimated to be .2 billion and indirect costs billion.

The single best way to protect against the flu is to get vaccinated each year. The CDC recommends an annual flu shot for everyone older than six months old.

The flu vaccine is available as an injection or as a nasal spray. The most common way that flu vaccines are made is using an egg-based manufacturing process that has been used for more than 70 years.

There is also a cell-based production process for flu vaccines, which was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2012. A third type of vaccine was approved for use in the United States in 2013; this version involves using recombinant technology.

While the annual influenza vaccine isn’t 100 percent effective, it’s still the best defense against the flu. Vaccine effectiveness can vary from season to season and among different age and risk groups and even by vaccine type.

Recent studies, however, show that flu vaccination reduces the risk of flu illness by between 40 percent and 60 percent among the overall population during seasons when most circulating flu viruses are well-matched to the flu vaccine.

During the 2016-2017 influenza season, the CDC estimates that flu vaccine prevented an estimated 5.3 million illnesses, 2.6 million medical visits, and 85,000 hospitalizations associated with influenza.

A 2017 study concluded that flu vaccination reduced the risk of flu-associated death by half among children with underlying high-risk medical conditions. For healthy children, it cut the risk by nearly two-thirds.

Another study published in 2018 showed getting a flu shot lessened the risk of severe flu among adults and also reduced the severity of illness.

Among adults who were admitted to the hospital with flu, vaccinated adults were 59 percent less likely to have a very severe illness that resulted in intensive care unit admission than those who had not been vaccinated.

The overall vaccine effectiveness of the 2017-2018 flu vaccine against both influenza A and B viruses is estimated to be 40 percent. This means the flu vaccine reduced a person’s overall risk of having to seek medical care at a doctor’s office for flu illness by 40 percent.

For the last several seasons, flu vaccination coverage among children age 6 months to 17 years has remained steady, but has fallen short of national public health goals, which is 80 percent.

During the 2017-2018 season, coverage dropped to 57.9 percent compared with 59 percent the year before. In the same time period, flu vaccination coverage among adults was 37.1 percent, a decrease of 6.2 percentage points from the year before.

For the 2018-2019 season, vaccine manufacturers have estimated that up to 168 million doses of influenza vaccine will be available in the United States.

Most people who get flu will recover anywhere from a few days to less than two weeks, but high-risk children and adults may develop complications such as:

  • pneumonia
  • bronchitis
  • asthma flare-ups
  • sinus infections
  • heart problems
  • ear infections

The flu is a common cause of pneumonia, especially among younger children, the elderly, pregnant women, or those with certain chronic health conditions or who live in a nursing home. In 2016, influenza and pneumonia were the eighth-leading cause of death in the United States.

People 65 years and older are at greater risk of serious complications from the flu. Estimates of the number of flu patients who also develop a bacterial infection range from as low as 2 percent to as high as 65 percent, according to one 2016 report.

It is estimated that between 70 and 85 percent of seasonal flu-related deaths have occurred in people 65 years and older. Between 50 and 70 percent of seasonal flu-related hospitalizations have occurred among people in that age group.

In addition to the flu shot, the CDC recommends everyday preventative actions like staying away from people who are sick, covering coughs and sneezes, and frequent handwashing.

If you do get the flu, antiviral drugs — which can make the illness milder and shorten the time you are sick — can be prescribed by a doctor and can mean the difference between having a milder illness versus a very serious illness that could result in a hospital stay.

Flu vs. Coronavirus (COVID-19): Mortality Rates and Deaths ...

The death rate decreased earlier in the summer but has increased again recently. According to data collected by Johns Hopkins University, over 180,000 people have died so far in the U.S. due to COVID-19. Many people want to know how the mortality (or death) data for COVID-19 compare with that of a regular flu season.

People in the U.S. and around the globe are intently following news reports and other data about the COVID-19 pandemic. Most of us are eager to know when there might be an end in sight, but unfortunately, Americans continue to die at an alarming rate. The death rate decreased earlier in the summer but has increased again recently. According to data collected by Johns Hopkins University, over 180,000 people have died so far in the U.S. due to COVID-19. 

Many people want to know how the mortality (or death) data for COVID-19 compare with that of a regular flu season. But it may not be an “apples to apples” comparison, as you’ll see below. 

COVID-19, which stands for coronavirus disease of 2019, is an infection caused by a type of coronavirus called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The infection we know as “the flu” is caused by the influenza virus. Both are viral, respiratory illnesses, but they are not the same thing. 

Both coronavirus and influenza are spread by respiratory droplets and close contact. There are some other similarities between the two, including overlapping symptoms, which you can read about here. But because coronavirus and influenza are different viruses, a vaccine or treatment for one won’t have any effect on the other. In other words, the flu vaccine will not prevent you from getting COVID-19. That is one of the biggest differences between the two right now: A flu vaccine exists, whereas a COVID-19 vaccine does not. 

Other differences include length of time between infection and symptoms and how long the symptoms last. 

The first thing to know is that deaths due to COVID-19 and the flu are not counted in the same way. This means comparing the numbers isn’t as straightforward as we would like.  

Each death due to influenza in the U.S. does not have to be reported, so there is never a direct count. Each flu season, the CDC estimates deaths from the flu based on in-hospital deaths and death certificate data. They continue to update the data on their website as they collect it. Therefore, numbers from the last two flu seasons are not considered final just yet.

Conversely, each death due to COVID-19 is being recorded. The numbers you see and hear about are not estimates. So you can see how comparing mortality rates between the two isn’t exact at this point.

That said, here’s a quick look at the number of cases and deaths for the last two flu seasons (again, not final) and COVID-19 to date:

2017-2018 Flu 2018-2019 Flu COVID-19
Cases 45 million 35 million 5 million
Deaths 61,000 34,157 180,000

Breaking down the data

As with most topics in epidemiology, interpreting the numbers is complex. The data should be sound before any comparisons can be made. For example, health organizations are collecting data on COVID-19 differently. Should they look at only confirmed cases? Or also probable cases? How do they account for undertesting, especially in the first few months of the pandemic? Or delays in reporting?

Additionally, there are differences in how the numbers are reported. For example, this dashboard reports data collected from various state and county health departments, whereas the CDC uses a different process to confirm deaths before reporting. 

But there are other ways to evaluate the numbers. In the spring of this year, this paper found that weekly death counts of COVID-19 were much higher — on average 20 times higher — than weekly deaths from the last several seasons of the flu at its peak. 

Fortunately, weekly deaths from COVID have decreased in recent months. As you can see here, recent weekly deaths in the U.S. are not as high as they were in the spring, which is obviously good news. The decrease in the number of deaths is likely due to better protection of people over 65 years old, earlier diagnosis, and better treatment.

Mortality rate measures how frequently people die in a specific population during a specific time period. One way of looking at that is with the case fatality ratio. This is the proportion of people with confirmed cases of a particular condition who die due to that condition. 

According to this dashboard, the case fatality ratio of COVID-19 in the US is 3.1%. The case fatality rate for influenza will obviously change year to year. But news reports and the World Health Organization often estimate it at around 0.1%. While the medical community is still learning about mortality from COVID-19, it does appear to be more deadly than the flu. 

There is obviously a wide range in COVID-19 case fatality numbers by country. This can be due to many things, such as how much testing is going on, the age of the population, and access to healthcare. For example, if more people are being tested, the case fatality ratio will decrease.

It’s also too early to determine anything about seasonal patterns, since this pandemic has been going on for less than a year. What we do know is that certain people are at higher risk for complications, including death, from COVID-19. This is true of the flu as well. When comparing COVID-related deaths in different geographic areas, it becomes clear that age plays a role. In addition to older age, certain medical conditions can increase people’s risk for having more severe disease and complications (including death). 

Although COVID-19 and influenza may look the same to some people, they are definitely not. The COVID pandemic continues to be a danger to public health and should be treated as such.

If you think you might have COVID-19 or the flu, it’s best to limit your contact with others for the time being to avoid spreading your illness. Contact your healthcare provider to inquire about next steps and testing. Read here for more information on when to seek immediate help for symptoms.

Flu Cases, Deaths, and Vaccine Stats

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suspended data collection and assessment of influenza cases in the United States for the 2020-2021 flu season. As a result, current statistics may not capture the full picture of flu activities. For example, the cases and deaths might be undercounted, and data ...

sick on couch with cats

Natalie_ / Getty Images

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suspended data collection and assessment of influenza cases in the United States for the 2020-2021 flu season.

As a result, current statistics may not capture the full picture of flu activities. For example, the cases and deaths might be undercounted, and data from some states might be inconsistent or delayed.

In any flu season, the data that gets reported by the CDC each week is always preliminary and it can change as new information becomes available.

As of December 11, 2021, the CDC reported increasing influenza-like illness (ILI) activity in most of the country. At the end of the week of December 4, only New Mexico had reported high ILI activity, while Georgia, South Carolina, Missouri, Kansas, New York, New Jersey, and Washington D.C. reported moderate activity. The number of positive flu tests in the U.S. is small but increasing.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Clinical laboratories in the U.S. tested 58,767 specimens for flu viruses, of which 2.6 % were positive. Among the positive results, 97.2 % were for influenza A.

Public health laboratories in the U.S. also reported data about specimen testing to the CDC. Of the 22,062 samples tested, 567 were positive for the flu.

Influenza patterns vary according to the specific flu virus strains that are circulating in a given year, as well as human behavior. For example, some of the changes that the pandemic brought about—such as mask wearing and social distancing—slowed down the flu spread last year.

Another factor that affects flu patterns is vaccination. Annual flu vaccines are a safe and effective way to help curb the spread of the flu and to prevent hospitalizations and deaths.

The CDC tracks LIL activity levels in each state and presents a weekly flu surveillance report. LIL activity levels are defined as the following:

  • Minimal (levels 1-3)
  • Low (levels 4-5)
  • Moderate (levels 6-7)
  • High (levels 8-10)
  • Very High (levels 11-13)

State health departments track flu data provided by hospitals, clinics, clinical laboratories, and healthcare organizations. These reports can include information like the number of flu tests conducted, positivity rates, and the number of flu-like illnesses that providers saw in the patients they treated.

Data on ILI activity can give you a sense of how many people have respiratory symptoms in your state.

If the activity level is high in your area, it could mean that the flu is "going around" in your community. You can be more cautious and take preventive steps, such as washing your hands frequently and getting a flu shot, to help reduce veryour risk of getting sick.

If you're showing flu-like symptoms yourself, call your physician to see if you should go in for a test. In the meantime, you can take antiviral medications such as Tamiflu to help lessen your symptoms. You can wear a mask and avoid close social contact to stop the spread.

The flu and COVID-19 are different, though they do have similar symptoms that can make it hard to tell them apart. One of the key ways that we can keep track of all the data is by testing people who have symptoms to find out if they have the flu, COVID, or another kind of respiratory illness.

Clinical labs (like those used by doctor's offices and hospitals) and public health departments both test specimens to look for signs of the flu, but each has a different goal.

Clinical labs are more geared toward providing a flu diagnosis (or ruling out the flu) while public health labs are looking at the larger trends in flu illness—for example, which subtypes of the flu are circulating and how quickly cases of the flu are growing in different places and among different groups of people.

Public health departments often test samples that were already tested in clinical labs to look for a diagnosis, which is why the CDC tracks specimens tested by each type of lab separately to make sure that the numbers are not duplicated (if they were, it could make it seem like there is more flu activity in a community than there really is).

Some specimens tested for the flu might also be tested for COVID at the same time, or, if the flu test is negative, a person might need a COVID test next. This will probably be more common in the winter months when both types of viruses end up circulating at the same time.

Eventually, we may reach a point where we have a recurring "COVID season" like the annual flu season. For now, public health authorities are trying to follow both illnesses as they move through communities and report the data separately.

Thanks for your feedback!

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Yes. The “flu” kills more children, every year, but it is not pandemic. How many children die of influenza every year? It is not reported. “flu” is reported. Why is “covid” treated so different, Colin Powell died “with covid”. He also had “flu” symptoms, and diabetes symptoms, and insanity and dementia symptoms.

Heres How Many People Actually Die From the Flu Each Year ...

26-02-2022 · How many people died from the flu in 2020? After an unusually mild season last year, the flu is back this winter. Flu season, which lasts from October to May, typically results in millions of infections and thousands of deaths. Doctors explain how COVID-19 prevention efforts have reduced flu-related deaths this year.

26-02-2022

How many people died from the flu in 2020?
  • After an unusually mild season last year, the flu is back this winter.
  • Flu season, which lasts from October to May, typically results in millions of infections and thousands of deaths.
  • Doctors explain how COVID-19 prevention efforts have reduced flu-related deaths this year.

For nearly two years, the world has been obsessed with news and statistics related to COVID-19. While cases of COVID-19 have dwindled over time, we had a fairly mild flu season last year. This year, that number has trended higher.

Last fall, epidemiologists warned of a looming “dual epidemic” of COVID-19 and seasonal flu. Now, with a surge in COVID-19 cases this winter, flu activity across the country has also increased.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. is still in the midst of flu season, which runs from October to May. Like COVID-19, the flu can cause uncomfortable symptoms, have long-lasting side effects, and can even be fatal. While the number of confirmed flu cases last year was alarmingly low, the number of cases has definitely increased this year compared to last year. Here’s everything you need to know about the flu mortality rate and how it’s spreading this year.

The answer is a bit complicated: The CDC doesn’t accurately count the number of people who die from the flu each year. Instead, federal agencies are making estimates based on confirmed flu hospitalizations.

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Heres How Many People Actually Die From the Flu Each Year, According to Doctors

As a result, it’s difficult to compare flu deaths to COVID-19 deaths, which are actually recorded deaths, said Mark Hicar, MD, associate professor of infectious diseases at the University at Buffalo in New York. In fact, COVID-19 deaths are tracked by confirmed cases, “but there will still be many undiagnosed cases, so the number of deaths from COVID-19 may be higher than reported,” Dr. Dr. said. sea ​​card. So far, nearly 51 million Americans have been infected with COVID-19, resulting in more than 803,000 deaths, according to the latest data from the CDC.

For example, compared to the 2019-2020 flu season, the CDC estimates that more than 38 million people contracted the flu, resulting in 400,000 hospitalizations and 22,000 deaths. This is slightly lower than the 2018-2019 season (34,200 deaths) and significantly lower than the 2017-2018 season (61,000 deaths).

Why can the flu be so deadly?

The CDC explains that the flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by the flu virus that infects the nose, throat and lungs. There are two main types – influenza A and B – that circulate regularly each year. While many people catch the flu, get very sick, and recover, others may actually die from the virus.

“Influenza is a respiratory virus that kills at a very high rate even in modern times,” said infectious disease expert Amesh A. Adalja, MD, a senior scientist at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. “In severe cases, it can lead to pneumonia, which can be complicated by secondary bacterial infections.”

According to the CDC, other potentially serious complications from the flu can include:

  • Inflammation of the heart (myocarditis)
  • Inflammation of the brain (encephalitis)
  • Inflammation of muscle tissue (myositis, rhabdomyolysis)
  • Multiple organ failure (eg, respiratory and kidney failure)
  • Sepsis, a life-threatening infection reaction

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Who is most at risk of dying from the flu?

The CDC has a list of people who are at higher than average risk of getting the flu or even dying from the flu:

  • Adults over 65
  • pregnant woman
  • child
  • young children with neurological disorders

The CDC says certain health conditions can also put people at a higher risk for severe flu, including:

  • asthma
  • heart attack and stroke
  • diabetes
  • HIVAIDS
  • cancer
  • chronic kidney disease

“Influenza tends to kill the youngest and oldest,” said Dr. Adalia. “The very young and the very old may not have much biological reserve when it comes to fighting the flu.”

So far this flu season, 131 people have died from the virus, according to the CDC. There were also 7,516 positive cases of the flu this season, a big jump from last year, according to the CDC.

The figures are higher than last year, which is not shocking, Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist and professor at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Compared to the last flu season, “people are going out more and taking fewer precautions,” he said.

Still, the same disease-prevention measures we take to slow the spread of COVID-19 can also affect the spread of affected flu, said David Cennimo, MD, assistant professor of medicine and pediatric infectious diseases at Rutgers New Jersey School of Medicine. While flu rates are higher than last year’s extremely low numbers, they are still below the flu season average. Dr Dave said it was a “by-product” of efforts such as wearing masks, washing hands and maintaining social distancing. centimorgan.

The flu death toll “also depends on how many people have been vaccinated against the flu,” Dr. Richard Watkins is an infectious disease physician and professor of medicine at Northeastern Ohio Medical University. Millions of doses have been distributed this winter than usual, suggesting that when the COVID-19 vaccine comes out, the flu shot will be more up-to-date.

How to protect yourself from the flu

If you haven’t had the flu shot, Dr. Schaffner did this as soon as possible, because it takes time to build immunity. Flu season runs through May. “It’s not too late to get vaccinated,” he said.

The following precautions can also protect you from the flu:

  • Avoid close contact with sick people.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects.

Ways to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, such as wearing a mask and social distancing when around people outside your family, can also help you fight colds, flu, and other respiratory illnesses. “Influenza’s impact on deaths in the United States can be mitigated by our attempts to avoid COVID-19,” said Dr. conductor.

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The Flu Shot - More Risk than Protection? - Focus for Health

18-12-2015 · How many people really die from the flu each year? December 18, 2015 Barry Segal, Founder of Segal Family Foundation & Focus for Health. Every winter, we hear this terrible statistic that 36,000 of us are going to die from the flu, so we better all get flu shots.The truth is, the CDC uses an algorithm to try to guess the number, and they group the deaths together into …

18-12-2015
barry-2

Every winter, we hear this terrible statistic that 36,000 of us are going to die from the flu, so we better all get flu shots. The truth is, the CDC uses an algorithm to try to guess the number, and they group the deaths together into “influenza and pneumonia”. In 2001, they reported that 62,034 people died from “influenza and pneumonia”, but only 257 were diagnosed with the flu, and only 18 of those were actually lab-confirmed. The rest (61,777) died from pneumonia. Unfortunately, severe side effects of the flu shot are underreported. By accident, we met a 22 year old athlete who got the flu shot last January, and now is completely paralyzed in his right arm and lives with severe chronic pain. His chance of dying from the flu was almost zero, but thousands of people suffer from flu shot reactions due to a shot that was only 18 to 23% effective last year. Does that make sense?

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  • neurological autism symptoms
familiesfightingflu.org

Flu is Still Serious Just because flu mortality is lower than COVID-19 mortality doesn’t mean flu isn’t serious. CDC estimates that flu has resulted in 9 million – 41 million illnesses, 140,000 – 710,000 hospitalizations, and 12,000 …

How Many Americans Die From Flu Every Year?

In 2018-2019 between 26,000 and 53,000 people died from the flu in the US alone. Many people skip their flu shot thinking it doesn't matter, but an estimated 80% of children who die from the flu did not get their flu vaccine.

An elderly woman down with severe flu. Image credit: fizkes/Shutterstock.com
An elderly woman down with severe flu. Image credit: fizkes/Shutterstock.com

  • In 2018-2019 between 26,000 and 53,000 people died from the flu in the US alone. 
  • Many people skip their flu shot thinking it doesn't matter, but an estimated 80% of children who die from the flu did not get their flu vaccine.
  • In adults, getting an annual flu shot has been shown to decrease your chances of falling seriously sick with the flu by 40% to 60%.

Each year, the flu season comes along in the fall, and peaks somewhere in January and February in the US. Thankfully, cases eventually die down. Sometimes the flu season lasts all the way through until May however, at which point we all rest for a couple of days before worrying about sneezing our way through allergy season next. 

Influenza is uncomfortable and contagious. Did you know it can also be deadly? In 2018-2019 between 26,000 and 53,000 people died from the flu in the US alone. 

People die from the flu in various ways. Some people develop severe breathing problems, and cannot get enough oxygen to their organs, in the same way that people die from COVID-19. When this happens, their body shuts down. This is usually caused when bacterial pneumonia develops. The flu causes so much inflammation in your lungs that it damages your lung tissues. Bacteria can then get in and cause trouble.  

Other people can experience severe dehydration with the flu, such as babies, which can be deadly. Furthermore, if your immune system overreacts to the flu, you could die. This is called sepsis. Sepsis causes those cytokine storms you might have heard of in relation to the coronavirus. When your body overreacts to the flu, it can develop so much inflammation that multiple organ systems shut down, which can kill you. 

The scary thing about the flu is that you cannot really tell who will react very badly to it. This illness turns deadly more often for older adults over 65, and children under the age of five, however.  

History Of The Flu

The flu has been around for a while. Flu pandemics have actually been documented for hundreds of years, and experts say there are an average of 40 years of rest between each major episode, so it is best to be prepared. Strangely enough, it is not only humans who get the flu. Warm-blooded animals like birds, pigs, and horses can also catch these significant sniffles, aches and pains. 

Walter Reed Hospital flu ward during the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1918-19, in Washington DC. Image credit: Shutterstock.com

The Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918-1919 has gotten a lot of attention in the media. This is because it was a pretty big deal. This pandemic killed 675,000 people in the US and 50 million people worldwide in just about one year. (In contrast, at the time of this writing the coronavirus has killed between 500,000 and 600,000 worldwide after about 7 months of known pandemic). 

The 1918 pandemic was the most lethal influenza pandemic the world has ever seen. In most places, about 25% to 40% of people caught it. Unlike the new coronavirus that kills more elderly people than youth however, almost 100% of those who died from the Spanish flu were under the age of 65. More than half of the deaths during this pandemic were of people between 20 and 40 years old. 

Was the Spanish Flu pandemic the only of its kind? This was the most severe one, but other flu pandemics have happened in its wake. 

The H2N2 virus created a flu pandemic originating in Asia in 1957-58, and in 1968 the H3N2 pandemic started in birds in the US. Finally in 2009, the H1N1 pandemic also began in the US before spreading around the globe. 

Part of the reason why the Spanish Flu pandemic was so bad was that  people did not yet know how viruses could spread at that time. This coupled with the fact that antibiotics did not yet exist and neither did flu vaccines. This meant that doctors had few tools in their kit to treat severe cases of the flu, and pretty much had to sit back and hope for the best. This resulted in  many deaths.

Today, a serious flu pandemic could occur but at least we have some medicines up our sleeves to treat bacterial pneumonia, and the flu itself, which would save more lives. 

Flu Types

There are many types of flu viruses. These viruses were not isolated until the 1930s, and scientists are continually learning more about them, as the flu  evolves with time. 

The type of virus that causes flu pandemics is always influenza A. Aquatic birds are natural reservoirs for all known subtypes of influenza A viruses. Influenza also comes in types B, C, and D. People with influenza C usually have mild infections. Influenza D is something that only seems to attack cows at the moment, and not people. 

Are there further subtypes? Yes. Influenza A and B can both be broken down into subtypes, and then into “clades” or groups, and “sub-clades” or sub-groups. The subtypes of influenza A include A(H1N1 and A(H3N2). For type B these are B(Victoria) and B(Yamagata). 

Swine flus are not another type of flu. They are any type of influenza that can be endemic in pigs. These types can also sometimes infect humans but rarely do. 

Treatments

There is not one cure-all potion to treat influenza, but there are medicines you can take to decrease your chances of dying from the flu. The annual flu shot is something that offers you protection. Unlike other vaccines, the flu vaccine is not going to stop you from getting the flu altogether. You can still fall sick. What the flu vaccine does though, is it greatly increases your odds of surviving a strong bout of the flu. Statistics show that 80% of children who died from the flu in 2018 did not get their flu shot.

Image credit: SK Design/Shutterstock.com

In the overall population, when you get your flu shot, you reduce your risk of falling sick with the flu by 40% and 60%. 

Why is the flu shot not more effective? Scientists have to develop a new flu shot every year. In order to do so, they have to engage in some guess work to create it. Vaccinologists in North America look to South America and places like Australia before the flu season hits in North America to see what strains of the flu are making people sick in those places in any particular season. (The flu tends to start spreading in southern locations first before traveling north). They then develop a flu vaccine based on what types of flu they think will cause a problem in the North in the coming flu season.

Sometimes scientists get it right, and sometimes not so much. You can always gain an advantage during the flu season by having your flu shot, however. When you vaccinate yourself, you can also protect others around you who may be more vulnerable to the flu’s grip, and in doing so, you help your community stay healthy. 

Get your flu shot, wash your hands, and stay home if you are sick.  Avoid those who already are sick. These are your best defences against the flu. 

quora.com

Answer (1 of 14): WHO estimates that seasonal influenza results in 290,000-650,000 deaths each year due to respiratory diseases alone [1] In this era of COVID-19 it very important to understand what “due to respiratory diseases” means. It means that far more than 650,000 thousand people die ...

facts4eu.org

’Flu deaths in England 2014-2018, versus deaths “with Coronavirus” in 2020. Deaths attributed to the ’flu have varied between 11,875 and 28,330 per winter season So far this year, deaths of people who tested positive for Coronavirus total 8,937 We still have no official information on how many of these deaths were actually due to Coronavirus

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Is it cold and heartless, or caring and factual, to ask these questions?

PLEASE NOTE: What follows is the first of many articles we have published on COVID, back on 04 Mar 2020. It seems to have been linked to somewhere, by COVID enthusiasts who continue to post comments below, without reading our subsequent work. PLEASE read a selection of our full list of Coronavirus articles, available here.

Many readers will be watching the daily press briefings from No.10 each day in the late afternoon. Some readers will by now be craving information which is never asked by the BBC.

Over the months we have done our best to provide the answers to a variety of different questions which are never asked by the broadcast media. For our latest summary of more up-to-date articles please click here.

In early March we provided readers with World Health Organisation (WHO) data on deaths worldwide due to influenza. After significant research we can now provide readers with the official information on deaths in England from the ‘flu.

The information on ‘flu deaths we have provided above is the latest official and complete information available. The ‘deaths with Coronavirus’ figure is correct as of Easter Sunday, 12 Apr 2020 at 4am.

The information for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland is recorded separately and we have not been able to find comparable figures to add to what you see above. Nevertheless we think that the data for England is interesting on its own.

There’s no doubt that the Coronavirus is a vicious little blighter. By the time that most readers will have read this, the number of deaths in the UK as a whole, where the deceased also tested positive for the Coronavirus, will have topped 10,000. Our concern remains proportionality of response, as it has been from the start.

No-one ever batted an eyelid or launched a drone because of deaths from winter ’flu

In the winter of 2014/2015, England on its own lost 28,330 people due to the ’flu, to say nothing of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Neither the Government nor the media batted an eyelid. All businesses and shops remained open, as did schools, restaurants, charities, churches, parks, and everywhere else.

Flights continued as normal. No holidays, weddings, or concerts were cancelled. The plans for the General Election, the Olympic Games, the 2016 EU Referendum, and even the Eurovision song contest continued to stay on track.

The police were not employing drones to keep us all under effective house arrest. Operations for serious conditions other than the ’flu were not being cancelled. Elderly and sick people could continue to see their doctors. And the economy was not being trashed for the younger generation.

In other words, life went on, completely unchanged. 28,330 people died of the ’flu in England alone. 89% of these people were pensioners. But life went on.

This morning (at 4am when this article is being finalised ) 8,937 people have died in England who have also tested positive for the Coronavirus. We don’t know how many have died “of the Coronavirus”, we only know that 8,937 have died “with the virus”.

Let’s keep things sensible and form opinions based on facts

The ’flu kills. Massive job losses kill. Poverty and despair kill. Lack of exercise kills. Over-eating through boredom kills. Total loss of quality of life kills.

All we are asking for is for some balance in the debate. Let’s work this thing out properly. To do that we need some solid facts. If others will not provide them, then we have to. Insane that we should have to do this, when we are trying to survive on a tiny income and yet the larger media and Brexit organisations have so much money, but this is the world we now seem to live in.

If you can help us to survive in our fifth year, please donate a little something to us this Easter Sunday. Quick and secure donation methods are below. Thank you so much, and you'll get a personal email from a memnber of the team.

[ Sources: UK Government official 'flu reports including input from the Vaccines and Countermeasures Service, National Infection Service, Public Health England, with contributions from: Royal College of General Practitioners; Health Protection Scotland; West of Scotland Specialist Virology Centre; Public Health Wales; Public Health Agency Northern Ireland; Real-time Syndromic Surveillance Team, Public Health England; Flusurvey, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; Respiratory Virus Unit, VRD, MS Colindale, Public Health England ] Politicians and journalists can contact us for details, as ever.

Brexit Facts4EU.Org, Easter Sunday 12 Apr 2020

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