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7 rowsThe nickel is a US coin worth five cents or 1/20 dollar = 5 pennies. Twenty nickels make a ...

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CoinCoins Per RollRoll Total Value
Penny (1 cent or 1/100 US$) 50

.50
Nickel (5 cents or 1/20 US$) 40
Dime (10 cents or 1/10 US$) 50
Quarter (25 cents or 1/4 US$) 40
Kennedy Half-dollar (50 cents or 1/2 US$) 20
Native American One Dollar (100 cents or 1 s or 1/2 US$) 25
Presidential One Dollar (

piece)
25

Examples of Coin Conversions

100000 cents to dimesHow much is 10 dimes worth?nickel to dimesHow much is 30 cents worth?How much is 325 pennies worth?How much is 420 dimes worth?3 cents to pennies851 quarters to dollars

The penny, nickel, dime, and quarter are the circulating coins that we commonly use today.

References

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20 nickels is how much money?

20 nickels is how much money? Wiki User. ∙ 2010-04-26 22:49:27. See Answer. Best Answer. Copy. one dollar. Wiki User. ∙ 2010-04-26 22:49:27. This answer is:

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convertunits.com

How many nickels in 1 dollars? The answer is 20. We assume you are converting between nickel and dollar bill. You can view more details on each measurement unit: nickels or dollars The main non-SI unit for U.S. currency is the dollar. 1 nickels is equal to 0.05 dollar. Note that rounding errors may occur, so always check the results.



How many nickels in 1 dollars? The answer is 20.
We assume you are converting between nickel and dollar bill. You can view more details on each measurement unit:

nickels or dollars


The main non-SI unit for U.S. currency is the dollar. 1 nickels is equal to 0.05 dollar. Note that rounding errors may occur, so always check the results. Use this page to learn how to convert between nickels and dollars.

Type in your own numbers in the form to convert the units!


›› Quick conversion chart of nickels to dollars

1 nickels to dollars = 0.05 dollars

10 nickels to dollars = 0.5 dollars

20 nickels to dollars = 1 dollars

30 nickels to dollars = 1.5 dollars

40 nickels to dollars = 2 dollars

50 nickels to dollars = 2.5 dollars

100 nickels to dollars = 5 dollars

200 nickels to dollars = 10 dollars



You can do the reverse unit conversion from dollars to nickels, or enter any two units below:

nickels to quarter
nickels to hundred dollar bill
nickels to five dollar bill
nickels to dime
nickels to half dollar
nickels to penny
nickels to ten dollar bill
nickels to two dollar bill
nickels to twenty dollar bill
nickels to cent


›› Metric conversions and more

ConvertUnits.com provides an online conversion calculator for all types of measurement units. You can find metric conversion tables for SI units, as well as English units, currency, and other data. Type in unit symbols, abbreviations, or full names for units of length, area, mass, pressure, and other types. Examples include mm, inch, 100 kg, US fluid ounce, 6'3", 10 stone 4, cubic cm, metres squared, grams, moles, feet per second, and many more!

People also ask
More FAQs for 20 nickels is how much
  • How much is 20 Nickels equal to?

    How much is a 100 nickel worth? 100 nickels also equals to: 5 dollars. 100 nickel ÷ 20 = 5 dollars. 20 quarters. 100 nickel ÷ 5 = 20 quarters. 50 dimes. 100 nickel ÷ 2 = 50 dimes. 500 pennies.


    How many nickels in 1 dollars? The answer is 20.
    We assume you are converting between nickel and dollar bill. You can view more details on each measurement unit:

    nickels or dollars


    The main non-SI unit for U.S. currency is the dollar. 1 nickels is equal to 0.05 dollar. Note that rounding errors may occur, so always check the results. Use this page to learn how to convert between nickels and dollars.

    Type in your own numbers in the form to convert the units!


    ›› Quick conversion chart of nickels to dollars

    1 nickels to dollars = 0.05 dollars

    10 nickels to dollars = 0.5 dollars

    20 nickels to dollars = 1 dollars

    30 nickels to dollars = 1.5 dollars

    40 nickels to dollars = 2 dollars

    50 nickels to dollars = 2.5 dollars

    100 nickels to dollars = 5 dollars

    200 nickels to dollars = 10 dollars



    You can do the reverse unit conversion from dollars to nickels, or enter any two units below:

    nickels to quarter
    nickels to hundred dollar bill
    nickels to five dollar bill
    nickels to dime
    nickels to half dollar
    nickels to penny
    nickels to ten dollar bill
    nickels to two dollar bill
    nickels to twenty dollar bill
    nickels to cent


    ›› Metric conversions and more

    ConvertUnits.com provides an online conversion calculator for all types of measurement units. You can find metric conversion tables for SI units, as well as English units, currency, and other data. Type in unit symbols, abbreviations, or full names for units of length, area, mass, pressure, and other types. Examples include mm, inch, 100 kg, US fluid ounce, 6'3", 10 stone 4, cubic cm, metres squared, grams, moles, feet per second, and many more!

    Convert nickels to dollar - Conversion of Measurement Units
  • Which nickels are worth money?

    These are composed of iron and nickel, as opposed to the silicate rocks that ... If 16 Psyche is in fact loaded with precious metals, it could be worth an extraordinary amount of money, according to Dr Linda Elkins-Tanton, a space scientist at MIT.
    Psyche asteroid that was once thought to be full of iron, nickel and gold and worth …
  • How much is 20 Nickels worth?

    These 20 Nickels Are Worth a Combined Million A coin valued at five cents was the first official coin of the United States (in 1792), but nickels did not appear in the U.S. until 1866. On May 16 of that year, Congress passed an act to usher in the new five-cent coin, made of 25 percent nickel and 75 percent copper.

    Don't expect to find one of these nickels under your couch cushions. But if you do, don’t spend it.

    A coin valued at five cents was the first official coin of the United States (in 1792), but nickels did not appear in the U.S. until 1866. On May 16 of that year, Congress passed an act to usher in the new five-cent coin, made of 25 percent nickel and 75 percent copper.

    Over the next seven years, the Mint produced nickels and silver half dimes, before phasing out the half dimes. There are four basic nickel designs: Shield, Liberty, Buffalo and the Jefferson, with only slight variations in early coins. The 2004-05 coins commemorated Lewis & Clark’s journey and the obverse of the coin — the side with the head, typically — got a makeover in 2006.

    The value of coins varies by demand and is influenced by rarity and condition. In the U.S., two main organizations, the Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) and Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC), evaluate coins using the Sheldon Scale to assign a numerical rating, from 1 to 70. Coins rated 60 or higher are referred to as "mint" state coins. Gem coins are rated 66 or higher, and they possess exemplary strike and luster and no noticeable abrasions.

    You’re not likely to find one of the following 20 nickels under your couch cushions. But if you do, don’t spend it. They are worth a combined million.

    1880 Shield Nickel

    Sold at auction: ,125

    1880 Shield Nickel

    Only 16,000 nickels were produced in 1880, and only 100 to 150 are known to still exist.

    A raised lump just below the TE of STATES shows this coin to be one stuck for circulation rather than as a proof.

    Very few of these coins remain at the gem level, and only two are certified at a higher grade than this one.

    1867 Rays Shield Cameo Nickel

    Sold at auction: 9,250

    1867 Rays Shield Cameo Nickel

    Three different obverse dies were used to produce the 1867 Rays Shield nickel proofs. Due to a design issue, the coinage dies failed early, resulting in the decision to remove the rays from the coin mid-year.

    This coin appears to be struck from Die State 1. The frost on the surface of this coin elevates it to a cameo designation.

    Cameo is the amount of contrast between the relief (raised or recessed design) and field (background). 

    1927-S Buffalo Nickel

    Sold at auction: 5,350

    1927-S Buffalo Nickel

    While common among circulated coins, the 1927-S is rare in mint state and one of the rarest Buffalos when in gem condition, with only three other Buffalo years rarer.

    This is the highest graded coin of its type.

    1918-S Buffalo Nickel

    Sold at auction: 5,350

    1918-S Buffalo Nickel

    The 1918-S is a scarce coin in any state and rare in mint state.

    This coin is graded gem quality, making it the rarest regular strike Buffalo nickel between 1913 and 1919.

    Sold at auction: 2,250

    1867 Rays Cameo Proof Shield Nickel

    It’s believed that the original proofs were struck on Feb. 8, 1867 and there are no more than 10 known to remain from the original 25.

    Restrikes were apparently produced later. This coin has a frost, which provides a cameo effect on each side.

    1917-S Buffalo Nickel

    Sold at auction: 8,000

    1917-S Buffalo Nickel

    The majority of 1917-S nickels were not well struck and show significant die erosion.

    This coin, the finest certified by both major services, is well struck with an unusually sharp image and has only a small amount of die erosion.

    1920-D Regular Strike Buffalo Nickel

    Sold at auction: 8,000

    1920-D Regular Strike Buffalo Nickel

    About 9.5 million nickels were produced at each of the Denver and San Francisco Mints in 1920, compared to more than 63 million in Philadelphia.

    It’s estimated that only 80 of these coins exist in mint state. This nickel is rarer that all of the 1924 to 1938 D nickels with the exception of the 1927 D, which is equally as rare.

    1913-D Buffalo Nickel — Type 2

    Sold at auction: 3,750

    1913-D Buffalo Nickel — Type 2

    The 1913 Type 2 nickels from both the Denver and San Francisco Mints had a low mintage.

    While the 1913-D is not quite as rare as the 1913-S, it is one of the most difficult Buffalo nickels to find in any condition.

    This coin is of the highest quality and as such is equal in rarity to most other early nickels from these mints.

    1918/7-D Buffalo Nickel

    Sold at auction: 5,250

    1918/7-D Buffalo Nickel

    This coin is one of the finest examples of its kind.

    With only a faint fleck of carbon seen before the Indian’s chin, it is rated as a gem.

    1916 Doubled Die Obverse Nickel

    Sold at auction: 3,000

    1916 Doubled Die Obverse Nickel

    Graded the seventh finest nickel of its type, this coin is in mint condition.

    1918/7-D Buffalo Nickel

    Sold at auction: 1,000

    1918/7-D Buffalo Nickel

    One of only two coins in its grade, this coin is the fifth finest example of the 1918/7-D Buffalo nickel.

    A small carbon spot on the neck likely contributes to its grade that is just short of a gem.

    1880 Shield Nickel

    Sold on eBay: 5,000

    1880 Shield Nickel

    At only 16,000, the 1880 Shield Nickel had one of the lowest mintages of the Shield series.

    This mint condition coin is one of two determined to be of the highest grade for a nickel of this year.

    1916 Doubled Die Obverse Buffalo Nickel

    Sold at auction: 4,500

    1916 Doubled Die Obverse Buffalo Nickel

    In circulated condition, there are only 100 to 150 of these nickels, with no more than 10 coins in mint condition.

    Though it has a small corrosion mark on the obverse, it is still considered one of the finest examples that remain.

    1916-D Buffalo Nickel — Doubled Die Obverse

    Sold at auction: 1,750

    1916-D Buffalo Nickel — Doubled Die Obverse

    Only about 200 examples of this coin are known to exist, with less than 15 in mint condition. This coin is one of the two finest examples.

    The doubling can be seen both on the date and on the Indian chief's lip and chin.

    1926-S Regular Strike Buffalo Nickel

    Sold at auction: 2,000

    1926-S Regular Strike Buffalo Nickel

    The 1926-S is the rarest non-variety Buffalo nickel, even in circulated grades. A 7 can be seen under the 8 in the date.

    Only 970,000 coins were struck, compared to over a million in other years.

    Only 17 nickels are certified to be gem condition as this one is.

    1918/7-D Buffalo Nickel

    Sold at auction: 0,750

    1918/7-D Buffalo Nickel

    Since so many World War I soldiers overseas had at least a few small coins in their pockets, there was a shortage of nickels in 1917 and 1918. The rush to produce more coins resulted in a hubbing error in late 1917.

    A die that had already been impressed with "1917" was also impressed with "1918," resulting in an overdate. While the exact mintage is uncertain, it is estimated at 100,000 coins. An estimate of those surviving in mint condition is about two dozen.

    Those that were circulated often are dateless due to wear. Seven are graded at the gem level like this one, but only one other nickel is of as high quality.

    1964 Jefferson Mirror Brockage on Reverse

    Sold on eBay:

  • ,150,000

    1964 Jefferson Mirror Brockage on Reverse

    Listed as a "two headed" coin, (only one of these is known to exist, a 2000 Jefferson Nickel) this coin is actually a brockage, an error where a mirror image of a coin is struck on each side of a coin.

    In this case, two "head" sides of the coin appear, making it unique.

    1913 Liberty Head Nickel

    Sold at auction: ,172,500

    1913 Liberty Head Nickel

    The third of the five coins currently in private hands, the Walton specimen and the McDermott coin (which is displayed at the ANA Money Museum in Colorado Springs) are the only two that are flatly struck across the coin on the reverse.

    A collector and dealer, George O. Walton repeatedly denied owning the coin, instead saying he had "access to the coin whenever he wanted to display it." He also had a fake coin that he passed around casually.

    This original 1913 coin was sold at auction 30 years after his death, having passed through several owners.

    1913 Liberty Head Nickel

    Sold at auction: ,737,500

    1913 Liberty Head Nickel

    One of the five 1913 Liberty Head Nickels, the Olsen Specimen passed hands several times since it was split from the Green Collection.

    At one time, this coin was sold to King Farouk of Egypt, who considered it redundant since he had already acquired the Norweb coin that currently resides at the Smithsonian Institution.

    1913 Liberty Head Nickel

    Sold at auction: ,560,000

    1913 Liberty Head Nickel

    The 1913 Liberty Head Nickel is one of the most coveted coins in U.S. coin collecting history. Only five examples of uncirculated coins are known to exist, and as early as 1920, all five were owned by one individual, Samuel W. Brown, and later sold to Col. Edward H.R. Green.

    After Green's death, they were purchased from his estate and then disbursed. This coin was purchased by Louis E. Eliasberg Sr. in 1948. Two are now held by public institutions.

    This one, known as the Eliasberg specimen, is the finest of the five and possesses a surface like that of a proof coin.

    Related: Most Valuable Quarters l Most Valuable Dimes l Most Valuable Pennies

    How Much is 20 Nickels Worth?
  • How many Nickels make 20 dollars?

    how many 5 cents to make a dollarWays to Make
  • .00 using Quarters, Dimes, Nickels and Pennies. How to make a dollar (in coins) two ways.Mathematics – Equivalence to 5 cents and 10 centsDollars and Cents – Math Tutorial
how many 5 cents to make a dollar
convertunits.com

1 nickels is equal to 0.05 dollar. Note that rounding errors may occur, so always check the results. Use this page to learn how to convert between nickels and dollars. Type in your own numbers in the form to convert the units! ›› Quick conversion chart of nickels to dollar. 1 nickels to dollar = 0.05 dollar. 10 nickels to dollar = 0.5 dollar



How many nickels in 1 dollar? The answer is 20.
We assume you are converting between nickel and dollar bill. You can view more details on each measurement unit:

nickels or dollar


The main non-SI unit for U.S. currency is the dollar. 1 nickels is equal to 0.05 dollar. Note that rounding errors may occur, so always check the results. Use this page to learn how to convert between nickels and dollars.

Type in your own numbers in the form to convert the units!


›› Quick conversion chart of nickels to dollar

1 nickels to dollar = 0.05 dollar

10 nickels to dollar = 0.5 dollar

20 nickels to dollar = 1 dollar

30 nickels to dollar = 1.5 dollar

40 nickels to dollar = 2 dollar

50 nickels to dollar = 2.5 dollar

100 nickels to dollar = 5 dollar

200 nickels to dollar = 10 dollar



You can do the reverse unit conversion from dollar to nickels, or enter any two units below:

nickels to penny
nickels to quarter
nickels to twenty dollar bill
nickels to ten dollar bill
nickels to five dollar bill
nickels to half dollar
nickels to dime
nickels to cent
nickels to two dollar bill
nickels to hundred dollar bill


›› Metric conversions and more

ConvertUnits.com provides an online conversion calculator for all types of measurement units. You can find metric conversion tables for SI units, as well as English units, currency, and other data. Type in unit symbols, abbreviations, or full names for units of length, area, mass, pressure, and other types. Examples include mm, inch, 100 kg, US fluid ounce, 6'3", 10 stone 4, cubic cm, metres squared, grams, moles, feet per second, and many more!

online-calculator.org

100 rowsHow many cents is a nickel? 5 cents is a nickel, or 1 nickel = 5 cents. Nickels.

Online Calculators > Conversion > How many cents is a nickel

Nickels to cents conversion calculator converts nickels to cents and vice versa. To calculate how many cents is a nickel, multiply by 5.

Nickels Conversion

Nickels:

Cents:

Dollars:

Dimes:

Quarters:

Tens:

How many cents is a nickel?

5 cents is a nickel, or 1 nickel = 5 cents.

Nickels Cents
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100 500

markets.businessinsider.com

Conversion. Nickel Price. Price. 1 Ton = 1,000 Kilograms. Nickel Price Per 1 Kilogram. 19.98 USD.

Nickel Values Guide - U.S. Nickel Prices - The Spruce Crafts

Find out how much your U.S. nickels are worth in these easy to use, nickel coin value and price guides. An overview of each type of nickel is given.

The U.S. nickel values and price tables listed below have coin values and prices based on how much you can realistically expect a dealer to pay you for your nickels if you wanted to sell them today. When you try to determine the value of your nickels (or any other coins), keep in mind the difference between price and value. There is nothing worse than counting on your collection being worth a certain amount of money, and then getting a very rude awakening when you go to sell it, all because you consulted the wrong type of coin value guide when you made your appraisal.

Jefferson nickel's values are so low that I feel they represent an excellent investment opportunity in the highest grades. Additionally, Jefferson nickels are one of the best coin types for new collectors because you can just about complete the entire Jefferson Nickel series right from circulating coinage! However, this beginner's collection is fun to assemble but it will not make a great investment.

The only ones you won't usually find in pocket change are the silver wartime issues, from 1942 to 1945. If you're looking for investment-quality coins, consider purchasing high-grade coins encapsulated by third-party certification companies. If you know a young person who might enjoy coin collecting, why not learn how to start a coin collection on .

Buffalo nickels, on the other hand, are very popular, but I still feel they are somewhat undervalued. Buffalo nickel values are disproportionate to the mintage figures in many ways; in other words, just because fewer Buffalo nickels were made one year doesn't necessarily mean that year's nickels are more valuable. I feel that low-end Buffaloes are valued too high, but on the other hand, I feel that the highest-grade Buffaloes are a good investment. Unless you are an expert grader, make sure you purchase nickels that have already been encapsulated and graded by third-party certification companies.

Liberty Head or V-Nickel values are slightly more in line with what you would expect for coins of that period, but expert numismatists believe they are undervalued. They also think that there are a lot of errors and die varieties still to be found in this series, since other coin types from this period exhibit many interesting varieties.

In fact, the most expensive nickel ever sold was a liberty head nickel. There is also great mystery and deception surrounding this most valuable nickel. Couple this with the history of this coin series and you have everything that makes collecting these nickels worthwhile.

I have always been a big fan of the reverse design on V-nickels for some reason. I don't know if it's because I like the directness of the big V, or I am drawn to the general art style of the reverse. Regardless, V-nickels are my favorite nickel.

The Shield nickel is an interesting type, having no portrait and a big "5" surrounded by stars on the reverse. However, most coins start at least for very worn out (G-4) specimens, so they are too expensive for most beginning coin collectors. But, you may want to purchase a type coin for your collection. This classic unique design will certainly enhance any type collection of United States coins.

However, intermediate and advanced collectors may find this United States coin series challenging and interesting. The United States Mint produced all Shield nickels at the Philadelphia facility. Therefore, a date set would only consist of 16 coins. In the average circulated condition, it would cost approximately ,000 to assemble a complete set of circulated coins. Finding the 1883 "2 over 3" variety may be a little challenging, but doable.

Nickels were first minted in the United States in 1866. At that time most coins were made out of silver or gold. The United States made lower denomination coins out of pure copper. Although the nickel is silver in color, it has no silver in it. Nickels lack the glitter of silver and gold and are not popular amongst coin collectors. However, there are some very expensive nickels that every coin collector would love to own. Here are the top 10 most valuable nickels:

  1. 1913 Liberty Nickel - The Olsen Specimen: ,737,500
  2. 1918/7-D Buffalo Nickel - Doubled Die Obverse: 0,750
  3. 1926-S Buffalo Nickel: 2,000
  4. 1916 Buffalo Nickel - Doubled Die Obverse: 1,750
  5. 1913-D Buffalo Nickel - Type 2: 3,750
  6. 1917-S Buffalo Nickel: 8,000
  7. 1920-D Buffalo Nickel: 8,000
  8. 1867 Shield Nickel - Proof with Rays: 2,250
  9. 1918-S Buffalo Nickel: 5,350
  10. 1927-S Buffalo Nickel: 5,350 
Thanks To Rise In Nickel Prices, The Coin Is Now Worth ...

2 days ago · The value of the nickel is broken down as 4.66 cents of nickel content and 3.86 cents of copper content. It is also illegal to transport …

The rising price of metals including nickel and copper has led to a unique valuation of the metal contained inside common U.S. coins.

What Happened: The price of nickel has soared in 2022. The commodity is now worth ,200 per ton as of Friday. The price of nickel is up over 130% in the last year and now up 80% year-to-date in 2022.

The rising price of nickel has led to the five cent coin, which is the only coin named after the metal inside it, being worth more than its currency exchange price.

Despite the nickel name, the coin contains 25% nickel and 75% copper.

During a period of 1942 to 1945, there was no nickel contained in the U.S. nickel. This was done to help save certain metals for the efforts of World War II. The coins in this time period were split as 56% copper, 35% silver and 9% manganese.

Related Link: Nickel Rises On LME As Buyers Return After Squeeze

How Much Is A Nickel Worth?: It has been widely circulated that the value of a penny can sometimes be worth more than 1 cent.

With nickel prices soaring, the metal content of the nickel is increasing.

At the time of writing, nickel is ,200 a ton. This translates to .20 per kilogram and around .91 per pound.

Copper is worth around .67 per pound at the time of writing.

Based on a melting calculator, the value of a nickel is currently worth 8.5 cents, or roughly 70% more than what it can be used for as a form of currency.

The value of the nickel is broken down as 4.66 cents of nickel content and 3.86 cents of copper content.

While turning a 3.5 cent profit likely doesn’t sound too enticing, the difference in the metal contained in a nickel and the value of the coin can add up quickly.

Consider that a roll of nickels (40) is worth .41.

Melting 0 worth of nickels at face value would be wroth 0.38.

Before you race out to melt your coins, readers should know that it is illegal to melt pennies or nickels to make a profit. It is also illegal to transport more than worth of nickels out of the country.

investorplace.com

The Five Moonshot Surprises of the Week: 1. 5-Cent Nickels Become Worth 16 Cents. On Tuesday, the London Metal Exchange suspended trading in nickel metal after prices surged to 0,000 per ton.

thepennyhoarder.com

27-06-2019 · Hoarding Nickels: Why Your Pocket Change Might Be Worth More Than You Think. by Owen Ferguson. Updated December 31, 2020. Share on Share on Facebook; Share on Pinterest; Share on Twitter; Share by Email; Share by SMS; Getty Images . While conventional personal finance wisdom generally discourages hiding your savings under your bed, there’s one way that doing so might be a …

27-06-2019

While conventional personal finance wisdom generally discourages hiding your savings under your bed, there’s one way that doing so might be a sound strategy.

Although it’s possible to make money by hoarding pennies or by searching rolls of collected pocket change for coins with high silver and copper content, these methods are tedious and hard to scale. 

It’s easy to search through one roll of quarters in search of a pre-1965 coin containing valuable silver, but I’ve found that doing so with all 50 rolls in a standard bank box can take considerable time. 

Plus, after you search through the coins, you must re-roll and return them to the bank, which requires additional work.

There must be an easier way, I thought. 

And indeed there is: Buy nickels.

The Easier Way to Earn Money With Coins

Whenever you have money to put in savings, buy nickels by the box (0 each at a bank) and simply put the boxes in your basement, in your closet or under your bed. 

Consider American nickels as assets. Their denomination is so small, and their weight so comparatively great, that they are generally not worth a thief’s effort. If your house burned down, they would survive the fire, unlike paper money. Even if they were melted into a pile of slag, they could still be worth every dollar that you paid for them — or even more. 

The True Value of Nickels 

The common American nickel is made from an alloy of two base metals, nickel (25%) and copper (75%), known as cupro-nickel. Cupro-nickel is valuable for industrial processes such as shipbuilding, as are both nickel and copper individually, and both metals are listed on commodity market exchanges. 

The value of its materials means that each nickel has both a “face value” (

.05) and a “melt value” (

.03799296 on June 26, 2019, though this fluctuates). 

The melt value of a 0 box of nickels from 1946-2014 was .86 on June 26, 2019. This means that every box of nickels costs the U.S. Mint .86 in metals alone. Once the Mint applies stamps and cuts the metal into coins, it also gives people the right to redeem that metal for the same price at which it was sold: 0.00.

Two values of coins (face and melt) provide a unique advantage in investments: a guarantee that you will not lose any money. With 0 in nickels, there is no risk of losing money: You will always be able to redeem your 0 box of nickels for 0. 

Why You Might Want to Save Your Nickels

This advantage is the reason many people have started hoarding their nickels: They’re betting on future increases in the value of cupro-nickel.

Just as the U.S. Mint changed the penny’s composition from mainly expensive copper to mainly much-cheaper zinc in 1982, any changes to the nickel’s composition will mean that new coins will slowly phase out the existing inventory of cupro-nickel coins. Eventually, today’s cupro-nickel nickels could be a rarity sought out by treasure hunters. 

The Downside of Investing in Nickels

Of course, as with all investments, there are some downsides. In this case, the main one is opportunity cost, the effective loss you face as a result of not having invested your 0 in an opportunity that would have provided a greater level of financial growth (like a certificate of deposit or an index fund). 

Opportunity cost is a risk in any investment strategy, as there’s always the possibility that you could have chosen a more profitable investment — that’s part of the game. 

If inflation continues to increase and metal prices fall, the 0 face value of your nickels will have less purchasing power as the years go by. 

Another drawback to collecting nickels is their size and weight. A standard 0 box weighs 10 kg (each nickel weighs 5g) and is about the size of a large brick. If you’re collecting a large number, they’ll quickly start to take up space in your home.

Finally, there’s the small detail that legislation makes it illegal to melt down U.S. coins in the United States or to export more than 0 worth of coins.

Will You Become a Nickel Hoarder?

Despite the drawbacks, many people are building their own stockpiles of nickels, and there are no laws against collecting coins and then selling or trading them with other collectors. 

For more information and further discussion, you may want to explore the advice offered on forums like Realcent.org.

Owen Ferguson is a contributor to The Penny Hoarder.

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Herein, how much money would I have if I saved a quarter a day for a year? Thanks to investing and compound interest, a quarter a day can become a lot of money.For example, saving a quarter a day for 20 years means contributing

,824.If you invested that money at an 8% average annual return, you could turn it into ,507. After 40 years you could have ,516.

Nickel Price 2020 [Updated Daily]

View the latest Nickel price including valuable information such as what the metal is used for, Nickel as investment, and its price history.

For most people who aren’t interested in chemistry or manufacturing, nickel doesn’t really mean all that much. Isn’t it just 5 cents in value? But the truth of the matter is that this metal is widely used in society today. While it is used in the nickel coin (which is actually just 25% nickel and 75% copper), it is also used in buildings, transport, electrical power generation, medical equipment, food preparation, and mobile phones. It’s just about everywhere.

In fact, it’s one of the oldest metals known to man. People have used it for more than 5,000 years although they probably weren’t aware of it at the time. It was only in medieval times in Germany that people suspected its existence, when they were unable to extract copper from a red ore they found. They blamed a mythological sprite named Nickel, (which is like Old Nick, or the devil) and they called the ore Kupfernickel as “kupfer” is copper in German.

Then in 1751, a baron in Sweden tried to extract copper from kupfernickel, and instead produced a white metal. This he named nickel.

Below is the historical Nickel price per metric ton.

YearPricePrice (Inflation Adjusted)Change
1980,518.67,093.570%
1981,953.10,636.65-10%
1982,837.50,729.73-23%
1983,672.75,914.92-4%
1984,752.24,618.032%
1985,899.03,560.713%
1986,888.77,005.60-26%
1987,872.21,890.9720%
1988,778.14,585.5965%
1989,313.04,277.57-3%
1990,864.00,231.28-50%
1991,163.22,229.36-9%
1992,015.48,706.92-16%
1993,308.17,334.49-32%
1994,331.93,852.6116%
1995,223.56,710.8723%
1996,504.09,146.91-10%
1997,924.72,957.07-8%
1998,623.59,200.75-50%
1999,002.51,147.0423%
2000,630.52,719.3330%
2001,969.63,558.18-45%
2002,783.31,571.5412%
2003,630.29,283.2430%
2004,821.01,562.4030%
2005,777.82,194.826%
2006,125.61,364.9339%
2007,135.84,466.7735%
2008,141.47,936.68-76%
2009,672.40,375.82-44%
2010,810.00,421.7933%
2011,909.14,874.955%
2012,541.74,405.18-31%
2013,029.99,380.90-17%
2014,893.38,121.8211%
2015,862.64,712.55-42%
2016,595.18,051.45-24%
2017,972.27,235.6013%
2018,931.76,931.76-23%

Price History of Nickel

Demand for nickel increased when it started being used in steel production in 1889. During the non-war years it was used extensively for coins. But during WW II it was no longer used for coins because the metal was crucial in the production of armor.

Nickel prices are known for its high volatility, and it has exhibited a boom/bust cycle through the years. It boomed in the 1960s and 1970s, but prices have dropped considerably since then.

Its decline in prices has been noticeable in recent weeks, because prices of copper and aluminum have gone up from the depths reached during the global financial crisis. The problem is that while there is a lot of demand for nickel, the supply of the metal is too great. Too many regions have large stockpiles of the metal.

Yet despite the low price of the metal, major producers are still showing a profit for their efforts. This is partly because producing this metal requires very low energy costs. In addition, these producers are reluctant to cut down on their output because they’re afraid of losing market share to their competitors.

Some have hoarded the metal because of Indonesia’s decision in 2014 to cease exporting it, and some mining execs even thought it could reach to per pound by the middle of 2015. But it never did. Right now, the price is .97 per pound.

Indonesia is the 5th largest producer, with the top spots going to Russia, Canada, New Caledonia, and Australia. The US produces a measly 15,070 tons a year with its only mine in Oregon. In contrast, Russia produces 230,000 tons a year.

Nickel as Investment

If you’re bullish about this metal, you can use it as a hedge against the US dollar. You can even buy it in bars or bullion, but that’s not generally recommended. Its low value compared to its density means that you’ll have to spend too much for storage.

You can also trade futures contracts, in anticipation of a rise in the price. Or you can also invest in the stocks of companies that mine the metal. These companies can survive because they have generally low costs in producing this metal.

Purposes Used For

Nickel price
US Nickel coin composed of 75% copper and 25% nickel

The main reason why so many people and organizations hoard and sell nickel is because it is used extensively in numerous industries. Essentially, it is part of stainless steel which is usually 8-12% nickel. That means it is part of an alloy, and 60% of the world’s supply is used as an alloy with steel. Another 14% is for an alloy with copper. A nickel coin is an example of this, as it is made of mostly copper with 25% nickel. It is very popular for steel and currency because it is highly resistant to corrosion.

Obviously, as part of stainless steel it is widely used. This material is used for just about everything, including household appliances, medical equipment, and heavy machinery. This material is used in the textile, pulp and paper, pharmaceutical, chemical, petroleum, and food and beverage industries.

It’s also used in superalloys, which contain titanium, aluminum, tungsten, chromium, iron and cobalt. These are extremely resistant to corrosion, and they still retain their properties even in very high temperatures.

It’s also used in electroplating, so that it a thin layer of nickel is laid on top of another layer of metal. For example, steel is strong but it can rust. But with nickel-plating, the nickel protects the steel from corrosion.

Finally, it is also used with cadmium to make batteries for various handheld tools and mobile devices.

The demand for nickel will not cease for the foreseeable future. It’s only because there’s an oversupply of the metal which has caused its price to stagnate. It’s inherent value to society, however, is undeniable.

20 Most Valuable Nickels

Over the next seven years, the Mint produced nickels and silver half dimes, before phasing out the half dimes. There are four basic nickel designs: Shield, Liberty, Buffalo and the Jefferson, with only slight variations in early coins. The 2004-05 coins commemorated Lewis & Clark’s journey and the obverse of the coin — the side with the head, typically — got a makeover in 2006.

Don't expect to find one of these nickels under your couch cushions. But if you do, don’t spend it.

A coin valued at five cents was the first official coin of the United States (in 1792), but nickels did not appear in the U.S. until 1866. On May 16 of that year, Congress passed an act to usher in the new five-cent coin, made of 25 percent nickel and 75 percent copper.

Over the next seven years, the Mint produced nickels and silver half dimes, before phasing out the half dimes. There are four basic nickel designs: Shield, Liberty, Buffalo and the Jefferson, with only slight variations in early coins. The 2004-05 coins commemorated Lewis & Clark’s journey and the obverse of the coin — the side with the head, typically — got a makeover in 2006.

The value of coins varies by demand and is influenced by rarity and condition. In the U.S., two main organizations, the Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) and Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC), evaluate coins using the Sheldon Scale to assign a numerical rating, from 1 to 70. Coins rated 60 or higher are referred to as "mint" state coins. Gem coins are rated 66 or higher, and they possess exemplary strike and luster and no noticeable abrasions.

You’re not likely to find one of the following 20 nickels under your couch cushions. But if you do, don’t spend it. They are worth a combined million.

1880 Shield Nickel

Sold at auction: ,125

1880 Shield Nickel

Only 16,000 nickels were produced in 1880, and only 100 to 150 are known to still exist.

A raised lump just below the TE of STATES shows this coin to be one stuck for circulation rather than as a proof.

Very few of these coins remain at the gem level, and only two are certified at a higher grade than this one.

1867 Rays Shield Cameo Nickel

Sold at auction: 9,250

1867 Rays Shield Cameo Nickel

Three different obverse dies were used to produce the 1867 Rays Shield nickel proofs. Due to a design issue, the coinage dies failed early, resulting in the decision to remove the rays from the coin mid-year.

This coin appears to be struck from Die State 1. The frost on the surface of this coin elevates it to a cameo designation.

Cameo is the amount of contrast between the relief (raised or recessed design) and field (background). 

1927-S Buffalo Nickel

Sold at auction: 5,350

1927-S Buffalo Nickel

While common among circulated coins, the 1927-S is rare in mint state and one of the rarest Buffalos when in gem condition, with only three other Buffalo years rarer.

This is the highest graded coin of its type.

1918-S Buffalo Nickel

Sold at auction: 5,350

1918-S Buffalo Nickel

The 1918-S is a scarce coin in any state and rare in mint state.

This coin is graded gem quality, making it the rarest regular strike Buffalo nickel between 1913 and 1919.

Sold at auction: 2,250

1867 Rays Cameo Proof Shield Nickel

It’s believed that the original proofs were struck on Feb. 8, 1867 and there are no more than 10 known to remain from the original 25.

Restrikes were apparently produced later. This coin has a frost, which provides a cameo effect on each side.

1917-S Buffalo Nickel

Sold at auction: 8,000

1917-S Buffalo Nickel

The majority of 1917-S nickels were not well struck and show significant die erosion.

This coin, the finest certified by both major services, is well struck with an unusually sharp image and has only a small amount of die erosion.

1920-D Regular Strike Buffalo Nickel

Sold at auction: 8,000

1920-D Regular Strike Buffalo Nickel

About 9.5 million nickels were produced at each of the Denver and San Francisco Mints in 1920, compared to more than 63 million in Philadelphia.

It’s estimated that only 80 of these coins exist in mint state. This nickel is rarer that all of the 1924 to 1938 D nickels with the exception of the 1927 D, which is equally as rare.

1913-D Buffalo Nickel — Type 2

Sold at auction: 3,750

1913-D Buffalo Nickel — Type 2

The 1913 Type 2 nickels from both the Denver and San Francisco Mints had a low mintage.

While the 1913-D is not quite as rare as the 1913-S, it is one of the most difficult Buffalo nickels to find in any condition.

This coin is of the highest quality and as such is equal in rarity to most other early nickels from these mints.

1918/7-D Buffalo Nickel

Sold at auction: 5,250

1918/7-D Buffalo Nickel

This coin is one of the finest examples of its kind.

With only a faint fleck of carbon seen before the Indian’s chin, it is rated as a gem.

1916 Doubled Die Obverse Nickel

Sold at auction: 3,000

1916 Doubled Die Obverse Nickel

Graded the seventh finest nickel of its type, this coin is in mint condition.

1918/7-D Buffalo Nickel

Sold at auction: 1,000

1918/7-D Buffalo Nickel

One of only two coins in its grade, this coin is the fifth finest example of the 1918/7-D Buffalo nickel.

A small carbon spot on the neck likely contributes to its grade that is just short of a gem.

1880 Shield Nickel

Sold on eBay: 5,000

1880 Shield Nickel

At only 16,000, the 1880 Shield Nickel had one of the lowest mintages of the Shield series.

This mint condition coin is one of two determined to be of the highest grade for a nickel of this year.

1916 Doubled Die Obverse Buffalo Nickel

Sold at auction: 4,500

1916 Doubled Die Obverse Buffalo Nickel

In circulated condition, there are only 100 to 150 of these nickels, with no more than 10 coins in mint condition.

Though it has a small corrosion mark on the obverse, it is still considered one of the finest examples that remain.

1916-D Buffalo Nickel — Doubled Die Obverse

Sold at auction: 1,750

1916-D Buffalo Nickel — Doubled Die Obverse

Only about 200 examples of this coin are known to exist, with less than 15 in mint condition. This coin is one of the two finest examples.

The doubling can be seen both on the date and on the Indian chief's lip and chin.

1926-S Regular Strike Buffalo Nickel

Sold at auction: 2,000

1926-S Regular Strike Buffalo Nickel

The 1926-S is the rarest non-variety Buffalo nickel, even in circulated grades. A 7 can be seen under the 8 in the date.

Only 970,000 coins were struck, compared to over a million in other years.

Only 17 nickels are certified to be gem condition as this one is.

1918/7-D Buffalo Nickel

Sold at auction: 0,750

1918/7-D Buffalo Nickel

Since so many World War I soldiers overseas had at least a few small coins in their pockets, there was a shortage of nickels in 1917 and 1918. The rush to produce more coins resulted in a hubbing error in late 1917.

A die that had already been impressed with "1917" was also impressed with "1918," resulting in an overdate. While the exact mintage is uncertain, it is estimated at 100,000 coins. An estimate of those surviving in mint condition is about two dozen.

Those that were circulated often are dateless due to wear. Seven are graded at the gem level like this one, but only one other nickel is of as high quality.

1964 Jefferson Mirror Brockage on Reverse

Sold on eBay:

,150,000

1964 Jefferson Mirror Brockage on Reverse

Listed as a "two headed" coin, (only one of these is known to exist, a 2000 Jefferson Nickel) this coin is actually a brockage, an error where a mirror image of a coin is struck on each side of a coin.

In this case, two "head" sides of the coin appear, making it unique.

1913 Liberty Head Nickel

Sold at auction: ,172,500

1913 Liberty Head Nickel

The third of the five coins currently in private hands, the Walton specimen and the McDermott coin (which is displayed at the ANA Money Museum in Colorado Springs) are the only two that are flatly struck across the coin on the reverse.

A collector and dealer, George O. Walton repeatedly denied owning the coin, instead saying he had "access to the coin whenever he wanted to display it." He also had a fake coin that he passed around casually.

This original 1913 coin was sold at auction 30 years after his death, having passed through several owners.

1913 Liberty Head Nickel

Sold at auction: ,737,500

1913 Liberty Head Nickel

One of the five 1913 Liberty Head Nickels, the Olsen Specimen passed hands several times since it was split from the Green Collection.

At one time, this coin was sold to King Farouk of Egypt, who considered it redundant since he had already acquired the Norweb coin that currently resides at the Smithsonian Institution.

1913 Liberty Head Nickel

Sold at auction: ,560,000

1913 Liberty Head Nickel

The 1913 Liberty Head Nickel is one of the most coveted coins in U.S. coin collecting history. Only five examples of uncirculated coins are known to exist, and as early as 1920, all five were owned by one individual, Samuel W. Brown, and later sold to Col. Edward H.R. Green.

After Green's death, they were purchased from his estate and then disbursed. This coin was purchased by Louis E. Eliasberg Sr. in 1948. Two are now held by public institutions.

This one, known as the Eliasberg specimen, is the finest of the five and possesses a surface like that of a proof coin.

Related: Most Valuable Quarters l Most Valuable Dimes l Most Valuable Pennies

Counting US Coins: Dimes, Nickels, Pennies & Quarters ...

19-04-2019 · The nickel is an American coin that is worth 5 cents. A nickel is worth 5¢ or

.05. Here is a picture of a nickel coin. The President Thomas Jefferson is the man on the nickel. One nickel coin is worth the same as five 1 cent coins. A nickel is worth 5¢, which can also be written in dollars as

.05.

19-04-2019
Example Video Questions Lesson

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Example Video Questions Lesson

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20 rows  · Q: How many nickels make a dollar? The short answer is that there are 2 0 nickels in a dollar. ...

coincollectingenterprises.com

One pound of nickels contains 91 nickels. One nickel weighs 5 grams or 0.0110231 pounds. Furthermore, 1 pound divided by 0.0110231 equals 90.718581 nickels or 91 nickels rounded up.

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Nickel (5 cents or 1/20 US$) 40: : Dime (10 cents or 1/10 US$) 50: : Quarter (25 cents or 1/4 US$) 40: : Kennedy Half-dollar (50 cents or 1/2 US$) 20: : Native American One Dollar (100 cents or 1 s or 1/2 US$) 25: : Presidential One Dollar (

piece) 25:

Go to: Coin Converter
CoinCoins Per RollRoll Total Value
Penny (1 cent or 1/100 US$) 50

.50
Nickel (5 cents or 1/20 US$) 40
Dime (10 cents or 1/10 US$) 50
Quarter (25 cents or 1/4 US$) 40
Kennedy Half-dollar (50 cents or 1/2 US$) 20
Native American One Dollar (100 cents or 1 s or 1/2 US$) 25
Presidential One Dollar (

piece)
25

Examples of Coin Conversions

4 pennies to dollarsHow much is 20 pennies worth?1 quarter to penniesHow much is 974 dimes worth?20 dimes to nickels18000 quarters to dollarsdime to pennies525 dimes to dollars

The penny, nickel, dime, and quarter are the circulating coins that we commonly use today.

References

u1u1
Discover Old Nickel Values

Old nickel values are benefiting from renewed collector demand. The different nickel series, plus the varieties within the major series are attracting interest. A step by step approach identifies the varieties, dates and mintmarks, and how to recognize condition. All important steps needed to determine how much old nickels are worth.

Coin Values Moving with Precious Metals: Up-Dated 1/3/2022: Gold 23 | Silver .09


Old nickel values are benefiting from renewed collector demand. The different nickel series, plus the varieties within the major series are attracting interest. A step by step approach identifies the varieties, dates and mintmarks, and how to recognize condition. All important steps needed to determine how much old nickels are worth.

Nickels Representing Series: Shield, Liberty, Buffalo, and Jefferson Nickels

Steps Leading to Value:

  • Step 1: Recognize the Different Series of Nickels - US nickels include a variety of series and sub-varieties within series, all important to recognize.
  • Step 2: Date and Mintmark are Identified- Date and mintmark combinations are each valued separately. Rarity and demand contribute to a wide range in value found among all the different dates.
  • Step 3: Grading Condition - Judging condition is done by comparing your nickel to images and descriptions. Value charts highlight the importance of condition.
  • Step 4: Special Qualities - Surface qualities are examined to recognize collectible quality nickels.

How to determine old nickel values starts with identifying the series. Examine your coin and compare to the following images to find a match.

Note: Images within blue borders are Links to the different nickel series.

Step 1: | Recognize the Different Series of Nickels

Visit... Three Cent Nickel Values

Three Cent Nickel Values | A Special Coin

Date of a three-cent nickel and how well it's preserved separates the common from the rare. Not widely known, the three-cent nickel is a coin specialist favorite. They treasure certain rare dates and all high condition coins. A unique series of US coinage with continual demand.

Visit... Shield Nickel Value

Shield Nickel Value | High for the Right Coin

Introducing a nickel alloy five cent piece in 1866, Shield nickels are a first for US coins. Many dates in the series that ended in 1883 have very low mintage numbers. Small amounts minted, plus most served until very worn, leaves few available today. Grading images and video help identify the scarce condition, in demand nickels. Value chart list dates highlighting rare nickels.

Visit... The Value of V Nickels

The Value of V Nickels | Common to Very Rare

A nickel series gaining in popularity. Causing all dates and mints to rise in value. The series began in 1883 and collectors are discovering early years are difficult to find in nice collectible quality. Grade your coins carefully and compare to the old nickel values chart.

Visit... Buffalo Nickel Value

Buffalo Nickel Value | How to Find the Rare Ones

A very popular coin series rising in value. Even coins without dates are valued over ten cents. Today, collectors are closely examining Buffalo nickels looking for special dates and higher condition examples. Often large value differences are found in just a minor improvement in how well the coin is preserved. Collector preference is creating demand showing in strong values on the charts. Follow the steps to correctly identify and judge your old nickels.

Visit... Jefferson Nickel Values

Jefferson Nickel Values | Gaining Popularity

From the early dates to silver nickels many dates and mint marks standout from the rest in value. Found every day, compare your coins to the value charts. One of the few coins worth searching through your pocket change.

Step 2: | Date Plus Variety and Mintmarks are Identified

Nickel series have within special sub-varieties worth recognizing. Subtle design changes to the coin, branch mints striking small amounts of certain dates, and in the case of Jefferson nickels, silver added to the alloy.

Early years of each series saw modification to designs creating multiple varieties for some years. Recognizing "Rays" and "No Rays" reverse varieties of Shield nickels is important to value. Another example; Liberty nickels were minted with no indication of denomination as part of the design in the beginning of the series. Quickly changed creating a sought-after variety. Buffalo nickels with modifications to the reverse and alloy differences in Jefferson nickels, all are considered, helping narrow value range.

Examples of date and mintmark combinations are included as part of a typical collector set of coins. Many dates of each series are available and affordable. Many mintmark varieties of dates are also common. Identifying the different mintmarks used by branch mints is needed, along with the date to separate common from scarce issues.

Recognizing all date and mintmarks is covered in-depth and listed on value chart.

🔎In Step 1 above are image links to match your coin. Visit the series page for value charts and details on how to value your old nickel.

Step 3: | Grading Condition | Old Nickel Values are Conditional

Grading a coin is judging its condition compared to standards. The amount of wear is examined and a "Grade" is used to indicate its state of preservation. These grades identify condition and narrow values.

Nickels in Different Grades: Mint State, Extremely Fine, Fine, and Good Condition

Beginning with the top-grade Mint State; the following are descriptions of grades used to indicate condition. Greater detail to grading nickels is found on series pages.

Mint State Grade: Highest points of the design are first examined and if found without wear, the coin is a candidate for the Mint State grade. Indicators of wear are smoothing of the high peaks of design and loss of the luster to the surface. The shine of a mint state coin is due to the delicate luster, part of the surface when minted. Dulling and smoothing of luster indicates wear.

Extremely Fine Grade: With just a small amount of wear to a coin, the very upper parts of the design begin to flatten. If just minor amounts of wear, confined to small areas the coin are visible, the nickel is considered Extremely Fine grade. As example: Liberty's portrait on the "V" nickels shows just a few strands of hair merging above her forehead. Upper edges of leaves in the reverse wreath are slightly flattened. Minor smoothing and blending of upper contours define the grade.

Fine Grade: A nickel with noticeable flatness over most high areas defines a nickel in Fine grade. High points have lost the minor details and display smooth areas without detail. A Buffalo nickel showing the Indian's hair without fine strands is an example. Cheek is also slightly flattened. To remain in Fine condition, nickels are crisp with detail in lower relief - protected areas. Back to the Buffalo nickel, one indication is all numerals of the date are readable.

Good Grade: An old nickel worn to the condition only outlines of major devices remain is considered and likely grades as "Good". Fine details are worn to a smooth flat surface on these heavily used nickels. The shield on Shield nickels is slightly raised from the field, however all detail to the frame of the shield and leaves to the wreath either side is missing. Despite this heavy wear a nickel remains recognizable as to date, especially important to Buffalo nickels, known for dates wearing away quickly.

Grading Videos Narrow Old Nickel Values

Video | Grading Shield Nickels

Video | Grading Liberty Nickels Video and Descriptions

Grading Buffalo Nickels - How to Video and Descriptions

Video, Images and Descriptions | Grading Jefferson Nickels

🔎Above in Step 1 image and text links lead to series pages of in-depth coverage. Each series page defines grading in detail. Close-up images and descriptions of grades are used to judge condition. Additional video helps to identify many subtle points to grading old nickels.

Step 4: | Special Qualities Enhancing Value

Old nickels derive their value from collectors pursuing sets of these coins. Some dates are rare because few remain thus raising value because of scarcity. Others nickels are higher priced because of a high level of condition. One subtle feature is eye appeal a nickel displays. Coin collecting includes a visual appreciation of coins.

High to Low Grade

Nickels in Low and High Grades

Unless cost is a factor; collectors strive for the higher quality least worn nickel. Higher grades are in greater demand.

Toning and Appeal

Toning on Nickels

Nice toning enhancing the design and helping bring out details is the favored choice of collectors. Pleasing toning is often a deciding factor to solid value.

Absence of Damage

No Damage and With Damage Nickels

Excessive marks eliminate any collectability to a Jefferson nickel. The affordability of most dates allows a collector to pass on coins with distracting marks in the Jefferson nickel series.

Compare your coin to the traits of quality collectible nickels. These apply to all series and raise values. Positive qualities include:

  • Major and minor details of the design are visible.
  • Surface of the coin is relatively mark free.
  • Coloration is even and pleasing.

A coin meeting the above standards places it in the running as a collectible, valued coin.

🔎Match your nickel to the image links in Step 1 and visit; how to determine in-depth nickel values of your coin.

Coin Values | CoinStudy Articles

Grading Old Nickels | Video Series

Videos, close-up images and descriptions, give insight into the details to accurately grade the condition of your old nickels. Judge carefully to find the true potential value.

Finding Rare Nickels

Rare nickels, for example, ones with double mint marks, occasionally "hide" in your box of old coins. Interestingly, some are still found in circulation today. The reason is most require a magnifying glass to discover. In this case the smallest of details makes for a valuable coin.

Old Coin Values Using a Step by Step Method

A step by step method is used to discover old coin values. Beginning with identifying important dates and mintmarks. Next comparing your coin to images to judge and determine its condition and recognize its "grade". Value charts narrow how much coins are worth.

Safe Coin Storage | Recommendations

Recommendations on basic supplies that greatly improve coin storage. Providing for safe handling, preserving of value, and organizing your box of old coins.

Selling Coins describes the different types of markets, and the type of coins to match each market. Extra effort for sure, but finding the best coin buyers yields the best results.

Coin Values Discovery... finds Old Nickel Values and...

All old US coin values. The home page is an excellent index with images, helping to identify, and text links to all coin series, from Cents to Gold. Value charts, grading images and descriptions uncover how much your box of old coins is worth. Begin the step by step process of value to any coin series.

usacoinbook.com

USA Coin Book Estimated Value of 2020-P Jefferson Nickel is Worth

.27 to

.55 or more in Uncirculated (MS+) Mint Condition. Click here to Learn How to use Coin Price Charts. Also, click here to Learn About Grading Coins. The Melt Value shown below is how Valuable the Coin's Metal is Worth (bare minimum value of coin).

How Much is a Buffalo Nickel Worth? (Price Chart)

Buffalo nickels were minted from 1913 to 1938. Nowadays, you can determine Buffalo nickel value only by mintmark, the minting date, and its condition. Since these coins are relatively rare, even a heavily worn coin is worth well above face value if it has a readable date.

Buffalo nickels were minted from 1913 to 1938. Nowadays, you can determine Buffalo nickel value only by mintmark, the minting date, and its condition. Since these coins are relatively rare, even a heavily worn coin is worth well above face value if it has a readable date.

History

James Earle Fraser designed the Buffalo (Indian Head) nickel. Its obverse had a Native American rustic design, and the reverse was with an American Buffalo. The US Mint featured the first Buffalo nickel variety standing on dirt, with a ‘5 cents’ denomination placed on the top.

Unfortunately, such a design flaw caused the denomination to wear off prematurely, so it was changed in 1913. New coins got a denomination recessed below their rim.

The US mint produced 71 regular-issue Buffalo nickels at three places so that you can find three different mint marks:

  • Philadelphia without a mint mark
  • San Francisco with S mint mark
  • Denver with D mint mark

Since Buffalo nickels don’t contain precious metals, their value has been relatively stable over several years.

Year Mintage Mint state Good quality Fine quality Extra fine quality
1913 Type 1 30,993,520
1913 S Type 1 2,105,000
1913 D Type 1 5,337,000
1913 Type 2 29,858,700
1913 S Type 2 1,209,000 6 3 4 9
1913 D Type 2 4,156,000 7 6 3
1914 20,665,738
1914 S 3,470,000 7
1914 D 3,912,000 3 5
1915 20,987,270
1915 S 1,505,000 2 4
1915 D 7,569,500 1
1916 63,498,066 .4
1916 S 11,860,000 0 .5
1916 D 13,333,000 2
1917 51,424,029 .5
1917 S 4,193,000 0 4
1917 D 9,910,800 2
1918 32,086,314 .5
1918 S 4,882,000 5 4
1918 D 8,362,314 7 3
1918/1917 D ? rare 8 $

,144
rare
1919 60,868,000

.5
.5
1919 S 7,521,000 7 3
1919 D 8,006,000 4 8
1920 63,093,000

1920 S 9,689,000 2 0
1920 D 9,418,000 6 7
1921 10,663,000 .5
1921 S 1,557,000

,524
4 0
1923 35,715,000

.5
1923 S 6,142,000 0 2
1924 21,620,000

1924 S 1,437,000

,170
0
1924 D 5,258,000 1 .5 5
1925 35,565,100

.5
1925 S 6,256,000 4 9
1925 D 4,450,000 1
1926 44,693,000

.7
1926 S 970,000 ,949 4
1926 D 5,638,000 7 9
1927 37,981,000

.6

.5
1927 S 3,430,000 7

1927 D 5,730,000 9
1928 23,411,000

.8
1928 S 6,936,000 5

.9
1928 D 6,436,000

.7
1929 36,446,000

.7
1929 S 7,754,000

.7

.7
.5
1929 D 8,370,000

.7
1930 22,849,000

.7

.5
1930 S 5,435,000

.8
1931 S 1,200,000
1934 20,213,003

.7
1934 D 7,480,000

.5
1935 58,264,000

.5

.5
1935 S 10,300,000

.5

1935 D 12,092,000

.7
1936 119,001,420

.5

.5
1936 S 14,930,000

.5

.5
1936 D 24,814,000

.5

1937 79,485,769

.5

.5
1937 S 5,635,000

.5

.5
1937 D 17,826,000

.5

1937 D 3 legs ?

,107
2 0 8
1938 D 7,020,000

Determine Buffalo Nickel Value

Determine Buffalo Nickel Value

Once you want to determine Buffalo nickel value, you should pass through three steps, including:

Determining date and mintmark – It is crucial to locate the mintmark and identify the minting date before checking the value chart.

Grading condition – The coin condition will significantly affect its value. You can use images, check YouTube videos, and detailed descriptions to determine the approximate coin grade. However, only an expert can give you the real value.

Special qualities – Most collectors appreciate varieties, so you should check your coin and try to recognize the most appreciated qualities. Keep in mind that some of them can significantly increase the coin price.

Year Uncirculated Good quality Fine quality Extra fine quality
1913 Type 1
1913 S Type 1 0
1913 D Type 1
1913 Type 2
1913 S Type 2 0 0 0 0
1913 D Type 2 0 0 5 5
1914
1914 S 0
1914 D 0 0 5
1915
1915 S 0 5 0
1915 D 0 0
1916
1916 S 5
1916 D 0
1917
1917 S 5 0
1917 D 5 0
1918
1918 S 5 0
1918 D 0 5
1919 .5
1919 S 0 0
1919 D 5 5
1920

.5
1920 S 0 .5 0
1920 D 6 7
1921
1921 S

,200
0 0
1923
1923 S 0 0
1924

.5
1924 D 5 5
1925
1925 S 0 0
1925 D 5 5
1926

.5
1926 S ,650 0 0
1926 D 0 5
1927

.5
1927 S 5

.5
1927 D 5 .5
1928

.5
1928 S 0 .5
1928 D

.5
1929

.5
1929 S

.5
1929 D

.5
.5
1930

.5
1930 S

.5
1931 S
1934

.5
1934 D

.5
1935

1935 S

1935 D

.5
1936

1936 S

1936 D

1937

1937 S

1937 D

1938 D .5 .5

Besides 71 regular-issue Buffalo nickels, the US Mint produced seven proofs and numerous varieties. Most of them still exist, and they are rarely too expensive. On the other hand, coins in uncirculated MS 64 and MS 65 conditions can be costly and are often rare.

Rare Buffalo Nickel Value

Rare Buffalo Nickel Value

Rare Buffalo nickels, varieties (special or error coins somehow different from other coins produced the same year), or those with key dates (coins with a low mintage) are highly valuable. In most cases, collectors are prepared to spend huge amounts of money to get hold of them.

Quality Coins
1914/1913 over date 1916 double die obverse 1918 D 8/7 over date 1935 double die reverse 1936 D 3 ½ legs 1937 D 3 legs
Good / ,612 5 / 6
Very good 3 ,420

,624

,175
8
Fine 2 ,875 ,343

,423
7
Very fine 2 ,512 ,066 1

,710
6
Extra fine 4 ,843 ,474 0 ,334 9
About uncirculated

,494
,331 ,393

,667
,504

,214
MS 63 ,737 0,000 ,319 ,462 / ,246
MS 65 ,400 / 4,250 ,300 / ,631

Be careful since you can often find these coins counterfeit or altered. Therefore, it is crucial to have it tested.

Proof Buffalo Nickels

Believe it or not, you can find only seven proof Buffalo nickels. Proof coins are those specially made for archival purposes or checking matrices. They have sharp details with a unique brilliant surface.

Coins Year Price
Proof, variety I 1913

,350
Proof, variety II 1913

,000
Proof 1914 0
Proof 1915 0
Proof 1916

,200
Proof 1936

,000
Proof 1937 0

Keep in mind that the term ‘proof’ doesn’t indicate the coin condition but the way of their production or manufacturing. Poof Buffalo nickels in an average Proof 63 grade are highly collectible, so it is worth making an effort to find one.

Summary

As you can see, typical Buffalo nickel prices will range only a few dollars. On the other hand, uncirculated coins with key dates can grade thousands of dollars. If you find one of those nickels, it is time to research and check whether you are the lucky one.